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Good Evening

Hindi translation: Namaste

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Good Evening
Hindi translation:Namaste
Entered by: Roomy Naqvy
Options:
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20:18 Sep 21, 2000
English to Hindi translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Good Evening
Greeting
pascal
Namaste
Explanation:
It is true that many Indian languages do not have a time specific greeting. This is true of Hindi, Gujarati and even Punjabi. If you wanted to greet someone, there are standard terms used to greet people which can be used any time of the day.

Or else people use the English terms.

'Namaste' is a greeting term used which is widely used in Hindi. 'Namaskar' is more Sanskritised and is less prevalent. 'Namaskar' is used more in written language and not in spoken Hindi. 'Namaste' is just a way of asking the well being of the other person.

In Gujarati, for instance, if you wanted to greet someone, you would say 'kem chho?' which means 'How do you do?'. In Gujarati, you would not even use the customary 'Namaste' which is used in Hindi.

This is an issue that deals with cultural difference.

Similarly, though the words for 'Good evening' exist in Pilipino [Filipino/Tagalog] language but in actual practise, the term 'kamusta ka' meaning 'how are you' is used.

I hope this helps.
Regards
Roomy Naqvy.
Selected response from:

Roomy Naqvy
India
Local time: 17:50
Grading comment
Thanks for your help ;-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
naMore comments
Roomy Naqvy
naNamaste
Roomy Naqvy
naNamaste, Namaskar
Anil Goyal


  

Answers


3 hrs
Namaste, Namaskar


Explanation:
A common question from those who are learning Hindi. In Hindi, there are very few time specific salutation .

Two of them are (although none is commonly used), SuPrabhat (Good morning) and ShubhRatri (Good night).

For Good Evening it is okay to use the general term, Namaste or Namaskar. (which means 'my regards')

Anil Goyal
India
Local time: 17:50
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in pair: 206

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Roomy Naqvy
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs
Namaste


Explanation:
It is true that many Indian languages do not have a time specific greeting. This is true of Hindi, Gujarati and even Punjabi. If you wanted to greet someone, there are standard terms used to greet people which can be used any time of the day.

Or else people use the English terms.

'Namaste' is a greeting term used which is widely used in Hindi. 'Namaskar' is more Sanskritised and is less prevalent. 'Namaskar' is used more in written language and not in spoken Hindi. 'Namaste' is just a way of asking the well being of the other person.

In Gujarati, for instance, if you wanted to greet someone, you would say 'kem chho?' which means 'How do you do?'. In Gujarati, you would not even use the customary 'Namaste' which is used in Hindi.

This is an issue that deals with cultural difference.

Similarly, though the words for 'Good evening' exist in Pilipino [Filipino/Tagalog] language but in actual practise, the term 'kamusta ka' meaning 'how are you' is used.

I hope this helps.
Regards
Roomy Naqvy.

Roomy Naqvy
India
Local time: 17:50
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in pair: 12
Grading comment
Thanks for your help ;-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Vesna Zivcic
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 hrs
More comments


Explanation:
'SuPrabhaat' [good morning] and 'Shubhraatri' [good night] seem quite inappropriate.

No one ever uses these terms in spoken Hindi. Even in written Hindi, such expressions are only used in costume dramas or films. It is quite strange to come across such greetings.

Best wishes
Roomy Naqvy

Roomy Naqvy
India
Local time: 17:50
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Vesna Zivcic
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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