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Formatting Arabic font
Thread poster: linadia
linadia
French to Arabic
+ ...
Jan 22, 2005

Dear all,

My question may sound simple, but I can't figure out how to do the following:

I'd like to know how to write separate Arabic letters the way they look when written in a word.

For example:

حرف الباء داخل الكلمة يكتب هكذا: "بيت" أما بمفرده فيكتب "ب".
ما أريده هو معرفة كيف يمكن كتابته بنفس الشكل داخل الكلمة؟

Thank you and happy feast to all of you
nadia


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Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:13
English to Arabic
+ ...
It is simple :-) Jan 22, 2005

Hi Nadia,

It is indeed simple.

Just type ب and then on the dash-like character over the ت (shift-ت), and you'll get a بـ.

Hope that's what you meant.

Nesrin


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Tamara Zahran  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:13
English to Arabic
Hello Linadia Jan 22, 2005

linadia wrote:

Dear all,

My question may sound simple, but I can't figure out how to do the following:

I'd like to know how to write separate Arabic letters the way they look when written in a word.

For example:

حرف الباء داخل الكلمة يكتب هكذا: "بيت" أما بمفرده فيكتب "ب".
ما أريده هو معرفة كيف يمكن كتابته بنفس الشكل داخل الكلمة؟

Thank you and happy feast to all of you
nadia


It it simple, and it applies to any other letter that appears differently when you write it in the middle of the word. type the letter you want (ي) for example and then press Shift+ت
The key of the letter ت can be used with the Shift ket together to produce يـ , كـ or any other letters you would like to write separately but want them to look as if they were written in the middle of the word.

I hope this proves helpful.

Kind regards
Tamara


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linadia
French to Arabic
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you both but the letter is too long Jan 22, 2005

Hi Nesrin and Tamara,

Thank you so much for your replies.
This is a very useful tip and it works.
But the letter looks longer than it does when inside a word:

ب بـ
ت تـ
ل لـ

I want it to look just like it does when inside a word. I know there is a way, because I've seen it before.

Thank you again
nadia


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Nesrin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:13
English to Arabic
+ ...
Font type? Jan 22, 2005

Hi again Nadia,

Somehow I don't think there is another way, unless you use a corrector!

But I did notice that (in Word), the letter looks quite long in certain fonts (Simplified Arabic, Traditional Arabic, Arabic Transparent), but it looks shorter in others (Arial, Times New Roman). That may be it?
Also, it looks very long when I type it here تـ, but when the message is actually posted it appears much shorter. Did you notice the same thing? Very mysterious.

Regards,
Nesrin


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linadia
French to Arabic
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Yes letter length depends on the font Jan 23, 2005

Hi Nesrin,

I will just stick to that. You are right about font type. In some types (e.g. Arial,Times New Roman) the letter appears shorter than e.g. with Traditional or Simplified Arabic.

Thanks agains Nesrin and Tamara, you've been so helpful.

nadia


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linadia
French to Arabic
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Windows charater map Jan 28, 2005

Hello all,

I've found it.

Start - All programs - Accessories - System tools - Character map

There you can find the attached Arabic letters the way they exactly look inside a word.

nadia


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Mohamed Elsayed  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:13
English to Arabic
Proportional vs. Mono spacing Feb 9, 2005

Nesrin wrote:

But I did notice that (in Word), the letter looks quite long in certain fonts (Simplified Arabic, Traditional Arabic, Arabic Transparent), but it looks shorter in others (Arial, Times New Roman). That may be it?
Also, it looks very long when I type it here تـ, but when the message is actually posted it appears much shorter. Did you notice the same thing? Very mysterious.

Regards,
Nesrin



Hi Nesrin, Hi All

I guess this is quite late, but i thought of sharing this with you. I wanted to point out that some fonts are mono spaced fonts, others are proportionally spaced fonts. The difference is that with mono spaced fonts, all letters take up the same amount of width on the screen. An “i” has the same space as a “w” which is obviously wider. The same is applied in arabic with two letters like "أ" and "ي". In the old days (a few years ago), all screens were divided into columns. In the MS DOS world, screens were 80 columns wide. This meant that they could display 80 characters across and that all letters fit in a column no matter what their width. So, all early screen fonts were mono spaced fonts (one width) and an “i” went in one column and a “w” in another of the same width. Mono spaced fonts are harder to read because they make it harder to “chunk” words when scanning them from left to right. Within limits, the tighter the letters are together, the easier it is to see the whole word as a pattern and chunk it rather than read it letter by letter. Putting a lot of space between letters almost assures that readers will scan slowly and have a harder time chunking letters into words. Mono-spaced fonts is very suitable for writing programing code, it achieves the alignment of the code, which is so handy to any programmer.
Proportionally spaced fonts give each letter a different width and so, an “i” and a “w” have different widths and are pushed closer together.

Regards,
Mohamed

[Edited at 2005-02-10 22:13]


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