Mobile menu

Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Pricing per line
Thread poster: engrus
engrus  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:22
English to Russian
+ ...
Jul 21, 2003

Dear Colleagues,

May be this topic has already been discussed before, but I cannot find the right link. My question concerns pricing per line. Everything is clear with pricing per target word: I am just counting them and applying my usual rates per word to have the price for the whole document. What should I do with lines? The lines differ: some are longer then others some consist of one word only. I am so confused

How should I count the lines to give the price for the whole document?

Thank you for your help


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Lydia Molea  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 02:22
English to German
+ ...
In Germany, Jul 21, 2003

1 line = 55 characters. I.e. you do a word count, take the number of characters (with spaces!) and divide it by 55, the result is the number of lines.
HTH


Direct link Reply with quote
 

PatriziaM.  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 02:22
English to Italian
+ ...
And source word? Jul 21, 2003

Lydia Molea-Lanier wrote:

1 line = 55 characters. HTH


I take advantage of this thread to make a similar question.
Which is the price ratio between target line (55 characters) and source word?
For instance, if you ask Eur 1/target line, what would be the equivalent amount based on source word?
Any information is welcome!

[Edited at 2003-07-21 13:54]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Doru Voin  Identity Verified
Romania
Local time: 03:22
English to Romanian
+ ...
source vs. target pricing Jul 21, 2003

PatriziaM. wrote:
For istance, if you ask Eur 1/target line, what would be the equivalent amount based on source word?
Any information is welcome!


It depends on your source and target languages. 1 source word is not necesarily equal with 1 target word. Look for tables of equivalence between source and target languages.
So if you ask Eur 1/target line, this is the same as asking Eur 1 for 8 target words. Nothing on source words, yet.

Regards from Bucharest,
Doru Voin


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Sybille  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 02:22
Member (2003)
English to German
+ ...
Price per line Jul 21, 2003

is counted in a Word document under "Extras"/"Wörter zählen"/"Zeichen (mit Leerzeichen". The amount of characters has to be divided by 55 (= the number of characters per line, which every agency will accept). Then you get the number of lines and have to multiply it with the price (e.g.
1 €/line).
If you don't use Word files, a counting programme like TextCount is helpful. Please contact me to get the address.

A line of 55 characters has about 7 words
(as an average)

I hope this will help you

Sybille


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Сергей Лузан
Russian Federation
Local time: 03:22
German to Russian
+ ...
What should I do with lines Jul 21, 2003

[quote]engrus wrote:

Dear Colleagues,

What should I do with lines?
Ask the question in Russian as well. Sometimes it's 60 characters with spaces. It's surely German approach of pricing. I guess it used to be discussed in Russian, but only in general.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:22
German to English
+ ...
Number of characters varies Jul 21, 2003

In Germany, 55 characters per line is common, but 50 is sometimes also used, and anything inbetween (52, 52.5, 53), so clarify with your customer beforehand.

60 characters per line is common in Belgium.

Marc


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Carolyn Denoncourt  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 20:22
Member (2004)
French to English
+ ...
What about font size? Jul 21, 2003

There is a problem with saying a line has about 55 characters. Formerly this worked well with typewriter text, but with word processing today, a font can be proportionally spaced and fit sometimes 25% more characters per line. I suggest that if you must give a price per line, you state the font that will be used in the final text which will be priced by the line. A Courrier font may be best because it is not proportionally spaced and will be the most consistent from one line to the next.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:22
German to English
+ ...
55 big or little characters Jul 21, 2003

Carolyn Denoncourt wrote:
There is a problem with saying a line has about 55 characters.


Here in Germany, a line of 55 characters does not have "about" 55 characters. It has exactly 55 characters. So if your text has, say, 11773 characters, it has 214 lines, regardless of how many "real" lines it has when you print it out. 55 characters are 55 characters, whether they are big or little ones.

Marc


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 18:22
English to Spanish
+ ...
Words Jul 22, 2003

Don't work by lines; don't work by pages. Work by WORDS. If you have to give a quote from hard copy (paper) text it can become a bit cumbersome if the format is variable, but you can come up with some averages for words per line and then count words on pages.

With some practice you can get pretty good and fast also. But don't work by anything but WORDS. You set the standard, not them.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pat Jenner
Local time: 01:22
German to English
+ ...
proviso for hard copy source text Jul 22, 2003

Couldn't agree more with words rather than lines. However, an estimate of the word count based on hard copy is fine to give you a rough idea of how long it will take and the client of what the cost will be, but I think it is always better to use your electronic target text word count as the basis for charging. Use different source and target rates to reflect the fact that some languages are more verbose than others.

Henry Hinds wrote:

Don't work by lines; don't work by pages. Work by WORDS. If you have to give a quote from hard copy (paper) text it can become a bit cumbersome if the format is variable, but you can come up with some averages for words per line and then count words on pages.

With some practice you can get pretty good and fast also. But don't work by anything but WORDS. You set the standard, not them.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Ralf Lemster  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 02:22
English to German
+ ...
Market standard Jul 22, 2003

Hi Henry,
But don't work by anything but WORDS. You set the standard, not them.


Not quite - quotation per line is an accepted standard in the German market. As Marc pointed out, "line" is just a measure of text volume, and has nothing to do with the actual number of printed lines.

Best regards, Ralf


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:22
German to English
+ ...
Market standard Jul 23, 2003

Ralf Lemster wrote:
Not quite - quotation per line is an accepted standard in the German market.

I suspect this is a common source of misunderstanding outside Germany.

There is a page on my website on the subject, in English and German:
http://www.marcprior.de/english/prices.html
http://www.marcprior.de/german/prices.html

This information is not very comprehensive, though. The subject is crying out for a "HowTo": a survey of the different pricing methods (there are several), which countries generally use which method, how to convert between differeng count systems (ever tried converting from "Pounds per thousand word source (UK)" to "Euros per 55 character target (Germany)?), etc.

Perhaps someone could volunteer to collect information on the subject in the forums, so as to cover as many countries as possible, and then write a HowTo? It would be nice if it were translated, too - it shouldn't be too hard to find volunteers for that.

Marc


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jan Neumann  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 02:22
Member (2007)
English to German
not characters - key strokes Jul 23, 2003

For Germany, it's (generally) 55 key strokes, so you have to add the paragraphs too, otherwise you're undercharging. Sounds like penny-pinching, but over time it adds up

Jan


Sybille wrote:


is counted in a Word document under "Extras"/"Wörter zählen"/"Zeichen (mit Leerzeichen". The amount of characters has to be divided by 55 (= the number of characters per line, which every agency will accept). Then you get the number of lines and have to multiply it with the price (e.g.
1 €/line).
If you don't use Word files, a counting programme like TextCount is helpful. Please contact me to get the address.

A line of 55 characters has about 7 words
(as an average)

I hope this will help you

Sybille


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jirina Nevosadova  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 02:22
Member (2007)
English to Czech
+ ...
Pricing per standard page Jul 27, 2003

In my country (Czech Republic), pricing per standard page (1800strokes) (target language) is widely spread. This is quite comfortable. But there is a possible trap, too. Once I translated a book and the publishing house ment 1800 strokes WITHOUT SPACES, but I ment 1800 strokes WITH SPACES, of course.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Pricing per line

Advanced search


Translation news





Across v6.3
Translation Toolkit and Sales Potential under One Roof

Apart from features that enable you to translate more efficiently, the new Across Translator Edition v6.3 comprises your crossMarket membership. The new online network for Across users assists you in exploring new sales potential and generating revenue.

More info »
Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs