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Translators Registry in your country?
Thread poster: gianfranco

gianfranco  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 22:02
Member (2001)
English to Italian
+ ...
Nov 9, 2004

Dear all,

following a very lively discussion in the Italian forum (still running, see http://www.proz.com/post/182018#182018 ), I would like to elicit information from any ProZ.com member who knows or operates in countries where there is a Translators Registry, or an official list of translators/interpreters authorized to practice the profession.

The idea is to look at those countries for more details and to contribute to our discussion with information about the requirements established for the admission, rates regimes, aspects of the profession that are regulated, influence on the local translation market, etc...

I will start from here to search for some more detailed information, or pointers to where to find them, but at the moment I would be happy just to know in which countries there are such regulations.

Thank you in advance

Gianfranco


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:02
English to Spanish
+ ...
Forget the U.S.A. and Mexico Nov 9, 2004

U.S.A. and Mexico are two countries where no such thing exists. But we get by anyway.

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Narasimhan Raghavan  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:32
English to Tamil
+ ...
Nor in India to my knowledge Nov 10, 2004

And at this stage of globalization, it is just impractical.

Regards,
N.Raghavan


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lien
Netherlands
Local time: 03:02
English to French
+ ...
Thanks heaven Nov 10, 2004

It is still free here !

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Frédéric Bégon
France
Local time: 03:02
English to French
+ ...
Point of view : Registration and development Nov 10, 2004

I think that a "registration" should help new translators to start their activity.
For example the work of engineer can be perfectly done by someone gifted but who has got no degree in the matter.
Consequently one should not connect the title obtained from an university with the ability to perform a work of translation. I think it would be a mistake from a system of registration.

But how to help persons aiming at becoming translators ? I think by adopting the american spirit which enables any new start, what one names in Munich-Germany : The good business.


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David Brown  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:02
Spanish to English
Authoris(z)ed Translators Nov 10, 2004

Gianfranco Manca wrote:

following a very lively discussion in the Italian forum (still running, see http://www.proz.com/post/182018#182018 ), I would like to elicit information from any ProZ.com member who knows or operates in countries where there is a Translators Registry, or an official list of translators/interpreters authorized to practice the profession.


I agree with Henry.


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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 03:02
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
No registration in Germany either... Nov 10, 2004

There's no official list in Germany either - although the BDÜ (German Translators and Interpreters Association) would very much like to have the job titles "Translator" and "Interpreter" protected. That would mean that you have to have a verified credential before you could call yourself a translator or interpreter. But that's still a very long way off.

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gianfranco  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 22:02
Member (2001)
English to Italian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Just looking for information Nov 10, 2004

Dear all,

I did not intend to start a world-wide discussion about the advantages or disavantages of such system, nor I commented in favour or against. Neither here, nor in the Italian forum. I'm just looking for information.

OK, now we know that in the USA, Mexico, The Netherlands, France, Germany, India there isn't, but my question is:

"Do you know about a country, or do you live in a country where the profession of translator/interpreter is regulated by some kind of Official Registry?"

Thank you
Gianfranco


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Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:02
Member (2004)
English to Italian
UK... Nov 10, 2004

The Institute of Linguists (IoL) is proposing the status of "chartered linguist" here in the UK. At the moment, the institute is going through the appropriate channels to implement such a move.


Here is an extract from the last meeting:


...
The voting figures were 313 in favour, 3 against, and 1 abstention (including proxies). The total number attending was nearly 100, of whom voting members numbered 60.
...
The meeting was chaired by John Mitchell, elected President of the Institute at an AGM preceding the EGM. The Charter moves were explained in some detail by Keith Moffitt, Vice Chairman of Council, standing in for John Hammond, Chairman of Council, who was unable to attend for reasons of bereavement. Henry Pavlovich, Chief Executive, responded to some points made from the floor. We were fortunate to be able to have some technical points answered in person by Keith Lawrey from the Foundation for Science & Technology, an expert who has kindly been advising the Institute on its Charter moves. The meeting was minuted by William Hedley, Company Secretary.
...
It was encouraging that so many voting members and indeed non-voting members were able to attend the meeting and take part in the discussions.


and

A chartered institute for linguists

The profession of linguist – whether translators, interpreters, language trainers or bilingual workers – has no chartered body to which the public and members of the profession itself can look for confirmation that linguistic activities are regulated in the public interest. The Institute of Linguists is preparing to apply for a charter later in 2003. Work has been going on for over a year now, both internally and with a lot of welcome advice and encouragement from external quarters.

The Institute does a great deal of important work in the public interest and it is of a size and structure that meet the guidelines for applicant bodies. A charter is a mark of approbation, a signal that the body concerned is a professional one of good standing whose activities are important enough to warrant what is in effect regulation by government in the national interest.

At the moment anyone can call him or herself a linguist and advertise their services. There is no law barring the unqualified from practising as translators or interpreters in the way that there is in medicine, law or accountancy. Clients nowadays therefore usually insist that the linguist should belong to a professional body (and therefore abide by its Code of Conduct). How much better it would be if that body were also chartered with the greater professional protection that this would imply. The public consumer and qualified/experienced linguists would gain; only the unqualified would lose.

In addition to applying for chartered status for the institute, we are also working on the criteria for a possible extra application for individual chartered status for some qualifying members. Such a "Chartered Linguist (Translator)", for example, would demonstrate the highest competence, skill and professionalism coupled with a commitment to maintain and develop them as well as submitting to periodic assessment or review.

What a boost this would be if at long last those who work as language professionals could say they are members of a chartered body or even that they themselves are chartered in their own individual right. And what a benefit it would be to the public – in the public services and in the commercial world – if they could do their language business safe in the knowledge that there was a chartered body in place. We are not the only professional linguists body in the UK but we believe that we are the only one in a position to make an application for chartered status. We shall do our utmost to take others with us in the interests of the profession as a whole.

Henry Pavlovich
Chief Executive, Institute of Linguists"



Hope this helps.

Giovanni


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jmadsen  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:02
In Denmark the translation business is partly regulated Nov 10, 2004

In Danish we use two different words for translators:
Anyone, regardless of education (or lack of it) can call themself an "oversætter" (simply meaning translator).

But to be called a "translatør", short for "statsautoriseret translatør" (meaning state-authorized or sworn translator), you need an MA in translation and an authorization from the authorities. The title is a protected title, and with the authorization comes a number of obligations, e.g. automatic confidentiality, and requirements for care, precision and speed. If a "translatør" breaks the rules, he or she can be punished.

I have a description of the Danish translation system, but it's only in Danish. Let me know if you need information on any particular aspects.

Best regards
Jørgen Madsen


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Rossana Triaca  Identity Verified
Uruguay
Local time: 22:02
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
There is a registry for sworn translators in Uruguay. Nov 10, 2004


"Do you know about a country, or do you live in a country where the profession of translator/interpreter is regulated by some kind of Official Registry?"


In Uruguay there is a university career of "Traductor Público" (i.e., sworn translator) in the state's Faculty of Law, and by law all documents that need translation in order to be submitted to any government agency (foreign or domestic) *must* be oficially endorsed by such individuals (patents, contracts, birth certificates, etc. etc.).

I ignore whether they have a seal or just sign the documents as a notary would (I think it's the later), but they are naturally registered somewhere in order to verify the validity of the seal/signature. The only prerequisite for this is to have the mentioned university degree.

There is also a profesional body for translators ("Colegio de Traductores Públicos del Uruguay"), but it's not mandatory to join (although most do), and their sole requirement is again to have completed the degree.

Unfortunately (for those like me who dislike law to a great extent) there is no other possibility regarding education/associations in Uruguay, so I figure there are quite a lot people out there working as translators but with no "official" standing.

Cheers,
Rossana


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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 03:02
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
There's a Catch 22 - it's for Danes only! Nov 10, 2004

[quote]Jørgen Madsen wrote:

In Danish we use two different words for translators:
Anyone, regardless of education (or lack of it) can call themself an "oversætter" (simply meaning translator).

But to be called a "translatør", short for "statsautoriseret translatør" (meaning state-authorized or sworn translator), you need an MA in translation and an authorization from the authorities. The title is a protected title, and with the authorization comes a number of obligations, e.g. automatic confidentiality, and requirements for care, precision and speed. If a "translatør" breaks the rules, he or she can be punished.
*********************

Basically it's an excellent system, but you won't be accepted with just any MA in translation. It has to be from one of the two Danish business universities, and it has to be an MA with the right 'profile'.

Up to a point, it's fine to ensure that people really are qualified and know what translation is all about. But qualifications from other countries are to my knowledge NEVER accepted (At least not in English or German).

Even if you've done a diploma that covers half the subject matter at another Danish university with the same text books e.g. in Business Law, you have to take it all over again at teh 'right' university. So there are plenty of highly qualified 'oversættere' who can never be authorised as 'translatører'.

Others have simply bought a couple of dictionaries and registered themselves with the tax authorities to look official, so the system still doesn't separate the professionals from the cowboys.

OK, I admit to being one of those who have tried extremely hard to get an MA, but life is just too short to do everything twice! My degree from England doesn't count at all over here, or is rated at school leaving level... What you learn in real life is at least as important, but I'm really looking forward to being a Chartered member of the IoL!

Sorry, Gianfranco, that is no use to you, but it was a good safety valve for me!

There is far more to being a translator than fancy university certificates, even though what you learn at university is quite useful...


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Mihail M Mateev
Bulgaria
Local time: 04:02
Member
English to Bulgarian
+ ...
in Bulgaria it is rather the same Nov 10, 2004

Jørgen Madsen wrote:

In Danish we use two different words for translators:
Anyone, regardless of education (or lack of it) can call themself an "oversætter" (simply meaning translator).

But to be called a "translatør", short for "statsautoriseret translatør" (meaning state-authorized or sworn translator), you need an MA in translation and an authorization from the authorities. The title is a protected title, and with the authorization comes a number of obligations, e.g. automatic confidentiality, and requirements for care, precision and speed. If a "translatør" breaks the rules, he or she can be punished.

I have a description of the Danish translation system, but it's only in Danish. Let me know if you need information on any particular aspects.

Best regards
Jørgen Madsen



In Bulgaria it is rather the same - if you want to translate official documents for authorities, you have to be sworn translator. To be sworn translator, you have to be a member of translator company /you cannot be a freelancer and to be a sworn translator/. But, to be a sworn translator, youhave to be BA or MA /or at loeast secondary language scool/ in the language in which you translate.


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Ana Fernandez  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:02
Member (2004)
German to Spanish
+ ...
In Spain only sworn translators are registered Nov 10, 2004

The way to be registered is similar as in Denmark. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has a register with all the sworn translators that can work in Spain and "sworn" their translations ( www.mae.es) and I know that the Government of Catalunya has a similar register for the sworn translators from several languages into Catalan and viceversa.

I don't know another kind of register, only these from the different translators associations (ATIC, APETI, TRIAC, ACEC...)


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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 03:02
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
There is a registry of sworn translators in Germany Nov 10, 2004

Rossana Triaca wrote:

In Uruguay there is a university career of "Traductor Público" (i.e., sworn translator) in the state's Faculty of Law, and by law all documents that need translation in order to be submitted to any government agency (foreign or domestic) *must* be oficially endorsed by such individuals (patents, contracts, birth certificates, etc. etc.).

I ignore whether they have a seal or just sign the documents as a notary would (I think it's the later), but they are naturally registered somewhere in order to verify the validity of the seal/signature. The only prerequisite for this is to have the mentioned university degree.

Cheers,
Rossana


To be a sworn translator or interpreter in Germany you have to swear an oath at your particular state's regional court (Landgericht) - which you are only allowed to do if you have a German translation qualification (and not all German translation qualifications are accepted). The Landgericht in each state then keeps a record of the sworn translators in that state in its own registry (only for sworn translators/interpreters). However, as I mentioned earlier, there is no national registry.


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