Mobile menu

When huge companies offer you an in-house position...
Thread poster: Atenea Acevedo
Atenea Acevedo  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:34
English to Spanish
+ ...
May 31, 2002

I\'d like to hear from any of you who\'ve been offered an in-house position as a translator and/or interpreter at any large company (not necessarily a translation agency) whether you went for it or not, how you weighed your decision and how it turned out. I\'m in love with my life as a free-lancer, but offers do come my way and seem worth serious consideration (great pay, professional development, etc.), in spite of the obvious drawbacks (long hours, losing my freedom, etc.).



Your comments will be greatly appreciated!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Robert INGLEDEW  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 11:34
English to Spanish
+ ...
I WORKED THREE YEARS AND A HALF FOR NORWEB Jun 1, 2002

AND TEN MONTHS FOR TRANSLANGCO.



This is an electricity distribution company in Argentina, that operates under the name of EDEA. I was doing free-lance work for them and the volume of work justified me moving my office to the company. I started off invoicing 4600 Dollars the first month, and average of 3000 Dollars per month the second year, then 2200, and when they cut down my work to 490 Dollars in the month I quit and went to the USA. My mistake was having all the eggs in one basket, and I repeated this mistake in the USA.

I was giving an in-house job in an agency in Houston (no names, please, because I did not have a work permit). They paid me 2080 Dollas per month, which for the low cost of living in Houston was not so bad. After ten months the volume of work dropped and the fired me with no notice. I went through very difficult times, because I did not have any other customers on hand.

If you are young, it may be worthwhile running the risk. But now I believe it is better to have more than one work source.

I worked for the other company in the USA.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nina Khmielnitzky  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:34
Member (2004)
English to French
Working in-house Jun 1, 2002

Hello Atenea,



I have always worked in-house for big companies. The first one was Sears Canada which has a huge translation department: about 20 translators on site. Now, I\'m working for an international company, and I\'m the sole translator. While being employed full-time, I always took (whenever possible) translation contracts. The good thing about working in-house, is that you have security. You\'ll never have to wait for clients to pay you (unless you have a lot of clients as a freelancer and they always pay you on time). Also, you never run out of work. Of course, you can keep your clients and keep working for them on evenings and week-ends. The drawback is that you\'ll loose your freedom in a way, because you\'ll probably have to work 9 to 5. Some companies accept that their employees work a few days from home while being connected to the office. This is one of the advantages we had at Sears. You\'d have to check that with your employer.



Good luck,

Nina


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:34
Dutch to English
+ ...
Working in-house Jun 1, 2002

Hi,



I\'ve been working freelance for the past 10 years. I had a six months contract in-house at one of the big computer companies and although I worked flexitime (7 am to 3 pm) I found combining kids and work at location very difficult. So when they renewed my contract I said No. The pay was good and even the working conditions but I find it much easier to combine work and home by being freelance. I can always say No to a client and just take a couple of weeks off when, for example, one of my kids is ill or I just need an additional break.



Hope this helps you decide.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Atenea Acevedo  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:34
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you all Jun 3, 2002

Thanks for your kind and generous replies. The one offer that made me place this posting just seems too demanding of my time, my mind and basically the rest of me. I had a second interview and could see it quite clearly: it\'s one of those \"We\'ll give you a lot of money and your soul is ours\" kind of companies. So I said \"Thank you, but no, thank you.\" I\'m still a free, tropical bird!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tenten D  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:34
English to Japanese
+ ...
I wanna be a free tropical bird Jul 9, 2002

I\'ve been working as a in-house translater and interpreter and(!) secretary to presidents and two vice presidents.

At first, they said they wanted me as a trans/interpreter but they gradually asked me to do more secretarial jobs as well, which sounded ok.

But they don\'t care about my workload, (i am the only one translator/interpreter) and 6 hours long simul-interpretation + lots of documents to translate from every department and the thing is I\'m not paid enough.

(roughly, 1 hr simul-interpretation for 7GBP)



First, I agreed to start from 7k less than their offer as a trial. One of the bosses said they would raise the salary by 2k in a year, but actually this has never happened after a year. I once or twice was even collasped after long-hour interpretation and afterwards I told HR that I would like to have a break after 2 hours but it seems difficult for them to remember for each meeting.



Now I am seriously thinking of going back to the world with some sort of moral.



In the company, I have to be at the meeting or engaged in translation and here are no people to chat with, which is ok, but sometimes I feel so separated from everyone here. This is what you call translators\' fate (?). And they sometimes told me how much I am being paid (implying I am paid well). B^ll-s*hit. I am one of the lowest paid employees in the company. I know I need to stand up and speak up, though.



this is simply not good for my mental health.





Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxwilliamson
Local time: 15:34
Dutch to English
+ ...
Certain institutions. Jul 11, 2002

The translator\'s Mekka is the E.U.-translation-service. Whatever is said about liking the freelance life, on every E.U.-translator exam about 800-1000 candidates turn up for 10 open positions. There have been freelance translators who succeeded in passing the exams and they are no longer freelancers. All too happy to give up freelancing for a stable highpaying position with a lot of perks.

Depending on the recruiting body, psychological tests or your translation speed and knowledge of 3 to five language determine whether you will be able to work there. Starting salary €4500-€5.500 + a lot of perks worth another €400-1000 per month. This salary can evolve to €8000-9000 net per month for a Head of Deparmtment. I believe the pension of a Eurocrat-translator is about 80% of his/her last salary. If you had an opportunity to get there, would you still be a freelancer?



Direct link Reply with quote
 

Rick Henry  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 08:34
Italian to English
+ ...
depends... Jul 11, 2002

I think it depends on alot of things besides money. I\'m blissfully ignorant of how the EU translation service as a whole operates, but I can tell you that I\'ve worked for a \"quasi-federal organization\" (read the Federal Reserve) in the US, and you couldn\'t pay me enough to work in another government organization. The bureaucracy slowed absolutely everything to a crawl. Nobody (management) wanted to make a decision for anything for fear of losing their job, which in turn prevented us from doing our jobs. Sorry, but if you\'re not happy to begin with, no amount of money is going to change that.



R.

==



Quote:


On 2002-07-11 18:58, williamson wrote:

...

If you had an opportunity to get there, would you still be a freelancer?





Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxwilliamson
Local time: 15:34
Dutch to English
+ ...
Words in the wind Jul 14, 2002

Do you translate for fun. For the joy and the beauty of it and not because you need money. If that is so, you could lower your rates a bit and the volume to be translated will go up. If I browse through this forum, I deduct from it that low rates are \"unethical\" (a typical North-American bromide to say that you do not like something). But isn\'t that normal given the perception of the profession of the translator by the general public?



If as a translator I could earn €60,000 a year as a beginner in such a service and earn between €80,000 (average)-€100,000 (maximum) a year while rising on the career ladder, I would not hesitate. If you have been 20 years in such a service, you even might consider to retire a bit early.

To be clear: everything in this world is about how much money. All the rest are beautiful words in the wind.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

When huge companies offer you an in-house position...

Advanced search


Translation news





SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »
PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs