Client wants me to work on site for a year ...
Thread poster: Alexander Chisholm

Alexander Chisholm  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:49
Italian to English
+ ...
Apr 13, 2005

Hi, I have a customer who wants me to work in house for a client for a year, possibly longer. When I originally heard about the job from them, I had considered charging my normal interpreting rate (even though this is a technical writing job, in my native language) but admittedly, I had no idea that the job was supposed to last so long.

They have also suggested (but only ass an option) that I might even want to resign my self-employed status and work for them on a fixed term contract as a full-time employee. I am reluctant to do that as that would mean I wouldn't even be able to continue working with my old clients in my spare time, although I appreciate that I wouldn't have as much time as I used to have anyway.

Am I rhight in thinking this way? I'll also run it by my commercialista (tax accountant).

What about my idea of charging my interpreters rate, which is a daily/half-day rate and also takes into account the odd days I am not working etc.

For a longer term job such as this, how should I chage if I intend remaining freelance?

Is remaining freelance really the best option?

I would really appreciate hearing from anyone who my have worked in a similar situation in the past.


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Astrid Elke Witte  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 02:49
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
Remain freelance Apr 13, 2005

I can only say, unless you are really short of work or money, you should remain freelance. It gives you so much more freedom and independence than being employed by anyone, and I would not give it up lightly, whether you agree to work in-house or not.

Astrid


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Charlie Bavington  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:49
French to English
My experience Apr 13, 2005

I took on a vastly overpaid (which is why I took it - sheer greed!) part-time job last summer - 3 days/wk.
Although the spirit was willing, the body was weak - days when I was working at this part-time job, I just couldn't find the time or energy to do any translation.
You probably think, "well, the evenings will be free for freelance work" - if you're anything like me, they won't be. There's travelling time (and that's tiring) and then you gotta eat, and deal with post, talk to your family if you have one, and....and....and.... Of course, you may be vastly better organised and motivated than me, but you asked for experiences. And that was only part time

Another aspect, which may not apply in Italy but it might (or there may be something similar - perhaps your accountant or someone will tell you). You mention retaining your freelance status, whilst working full-time for this company. You're not allowed to do that in the UK (if you are self-employed and not a one-man company). The tax authorities over here consider that "self-employed" people who get all or most (whatever that means) of their income from one source are effectively employees of that source. The rule is, in truth, mainy to stop companies exploitating self-emloyment rules and having self employed people work for them full-time without having to pay them for holidays or sickness (which is, of course, a benefit of working full-time as an employee - a point you may wish to consider).

Basically of course the decision is yours, but in summary, I found it hard to juggle both.


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Emmanouil Tyrakis
Local time: 03:49
French to Greek
+ ...
average monthly income Apr 14, 2005

All depends on your actual income as a freelancer. You can calculate your average monthly income as a freelancer and if it is much higher than the salary of an in-house employee ask for it as a salary.

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Susana Galilea  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 19:49
English to Spanish
+ ...
same here... Apr 14, 2005

Charlie Bavington wrote:
I took on a vastly overpaid (which is why I took it - sheer greed!) part-time job last summer - 3 days/wk.
Although the spirit was willing, the body was weak - days when I was working at this part-time job, I just couldn't find the time or energy to do any translation.
You probably think, "well, the evenings will be free for freelance work" - if you're anything like me, they won't be. There's travelling time (and that's tiring) and then you gotta eat, and deal with post, talk to your family if you have one, and....and....and.... Of course, you may be vastly better organised and motivated than me, but you asked for experiences. And that was only part time



Not to mention all those movies you absolutely must go see

It's hard to give advice, as this will depend on so many factors (including temperament, as Charlie mentions). I also had a vastly overpaid part-time job for a couple of years, and the last thing on my mind when the workday was over was more work! While I miss the paycheck, I much prefer the self-employed lifestyle. And considering the enormous time and effort it takes to build a client base, I would encourage you to think carefully about whether jeopardizing your status as a freelancer for this job is worth it.

The question I would ask myself is, where will you be at the end of that year? Is this a job that will have provided you with skills and experience you lack, and that you can take with you when you resume your freelance life? Will it be a bridge to better opportunities you wouldn't have access to otherwise? Or is this just a temporary way to have a steady income? These are all valid reasons, again it will depend entirely on your specific situation and character. The way I see it, unless the job will open future opportunities or you have a pressing financial need, I would keep doing what you're doing. That is, as long as you're happy with what you're doing

Best luck with your decision,

Susana Galilea
Accredited Translator EN-ES
sgalilea@ispwest.com
www.accentonspanish.com


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Karine Piera  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:49
English to French
+ ...
Well, I am not so sure Charlie Apr 14, 2005

You mention retaining your freelance status, whilst working full-time for this company. You're not allowed to do that in the UK (if you are self-employed and not a one-man company). The tax authorities over here consider that "self-employed" people who get all or most (whatever that means) of their income from one source are effectively employees of that source. The rule is, in truth, mainy to stop companies exploitating self-emloyment rules and having self employed people work for them full-time without having to pay them for holidays or sickness (which is, of course, a benefit of working full-time as an employee - a point you may wish to consider).

Well, Charlie, I have a full-time job here in th UK, or better put I had since I am moving back to France tomorrow AND I was a self-employed translator during evenings and nights, and as far as I am concerned, the Inland Revenue has never objected to it.
I even was exempted from paying the NI taxes twice because I didn't earn enough to pay for it. So there might have been a mistake from their part, but they never caused me any trouble.)

Karine


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Charlie Bavington  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:49
French to English
I wasn't clear Apr 14, 2005

Karine Piera wrote:

You mention retaining your freelance status, whilst working full-time for this company. You're not allowed to do that in the UK (if you are self-employed and not a one-man company). The tax authorities over here consider that "self-employed" people who get all or most (whatever that means) of their income from one source are effectively employees of that source. The rule is, in truth, mainy to stop companies exploitating self-emloyment rules and having self employed people work for them full-time without having to pay them for holidays or sickness (which is, of course, a benefit of working full-time as an employee - a point you may wish to consider).

Well, Charlie, I have a full-time job here in th UK, or better put I had since I am moving back to France tomorrow AND I was a self-employed translator during evenings and nights, and as far as I am concerned, the Inland Revenue has never objected to it.
I even was exempted from paying the NI taxes twice because I didn't earn enough to pay for it. So there might have been a mistake from their part, but they never caused me any trouble.)

Karine


You are of course quite right in your assertion that you can be both "employed" and "self-employed" simultaneously in the UK. I perhaps wasn't clear enough in my distinction between "employed by" and "working for" above. If you claim that you are self-employed (and only self-employed) and yet the work that you do is all for one company (who does NOT employ you, as an employee, on their payroll), then the Revenue object. Which is what I meant by "retaining your freelance status, whilst working full-time for this company" - I said "working", not "being employed by". I could have been clearer. Apols


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David Moore  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:49
Member (2007)
German to English
+ ...
"Employed" vs. "self-employed" May 4, 2005

Charlie Bavington wrote:

Karine Piera wrote:

You mention retaining your freelance status, whilst working full-time for this company. You're not allowed to do that in the UK (if you are self-employed and not a one-man company). The tax authorities over here consider that "self-employed" people who get all or most (whatever that means) of their income from one source are effectively employees of that source. The rule is, in truth, mainy to stop companies exploitating self-emloyment rules and having self employed people work for them full-time without having to pay them for holidays or sickness (which is, of course, a benefit of working full-time as an employee - a point you may wish to consider).

Well, Charlie, I have a full-time job here in th UK, or better put I had since I am moving back to France tomorrow AND I was a self-employed translator during evenings and nights, and as far as I am concerned, the Inland Revenue has never objected to it.
I even was exempted from paying the NI taxes twice because I didn't earn enough to pay for it. So there might have been a mistake from their part, but they never caused me any trouble.)

Karine


You are of course quite right in your assertion that you can be both "employed" and "self-employed" simultaneously in the UK. I perhaps wasn't clear enough in my distinction between "employed by" and "working for" above. If you claim that you are self-employed (and only self-employed) and yet the work that you do is all for one company (who does NOT employ you, as an employee, on their payroll), then the Revenue object. Which is what I meant by "retaining your freelance status, whilst working full-time for this company" - I said "working", not "being employed by". I could have been clearer. Apols


I've never been totally clear on this distinction; I've been told that if you work for a major "co-op tea" agency ("branches everywhere") with only one central accounting point from which one is paid, one can only be regarded as "scheinselbständig", whereas others insist it's the fact that your jobs come from all over the country which makes you independent. Anyone out there got an official ruling on this? My tax office seems happy enough - maybe I should shut up and keep my head down....?


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