Mobile menu

How make sure I do not get in trouble
Thread poster: andre_
andre_
United States
Local time: 19:22
English to Spanish
+ ...
May 16, 2003

I have been asked to translate 2 birth certificates from Spanish to English. Now, I need to know whether I need to be a lawyer to do these kind of translations or can I just by being a translator do it? Do I need some sort of seal or anything like a preparers statement? I look forward to hearing from everyone that can help. Thank you all in advance.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Steffen Pollex  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:22
English to German
+ ...
To make absolutely sure you do not get in trouble, May 16, 2003

don\'t do the job.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Melissa Field  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:22
German to English
+ ...
If it were me... May 16, 2003

I would find out the end use of that translation and then determine whether your credentials/ability are up to that standard.



Years ago, I had my husband\'s birth certificate translated into English for the application to the Immigration and Naturalization Service. At the time, I knew no one in the business and simply chose a translation agency out of the yellow pages. I specified that I needed a translation that would be accepted by the INS. Along with the translation, the agency provided a \"certificate of translation\" - basically just a notarized statement that the translation was true and correct to the best of their knowledge. That birth certificate was one of the few parts of the application that went through without a hitch.



In retrospect, I suppose it would have been better for me to first check on the INS guidelines for translations. I\'m sure they could be found somewhere on the internet or ordered by phone.



I hope this helps your decision.



Regards,

Melissa





Direct link Reply with quote
 
Lucinda  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:22
Member (2002)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Ask the client if the country it is needed for needs a sworn translator May 16, 2003

Most countries need birth certificates and such to be translated by a sworn translator and then this translator at times also has to be registered by the consulate/embassy in question. So it is always good to ask and check carefully before accepting such a job.



Good luck!

Lucinda


Direct link Reply with quote
 

GoodWords  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 18:22
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Depends on purpose and place May 16, 2003

As Lucinda says, the client should tell you whether a sworn/accredited/certified translation is needed or not. If the answer is yes, this information may be relevant to you, since you are in the United States. However if the client needs the translation in a different country, the rules of the other country apply instead.



From www.notisnet.org/cliented/certification.doc:



\"What is a Certified Translation?



In the United States a certified translation consists of the following three parts:

1) The source-language (original) text

2) The target-language (translated) text

3) A statement signed by the translator or translation company representative, with his or her signature notarized by a Notary Public, attesting that the translator or translation company representative believes the target-language text to be an accurate and complete translation of the source-language text. Sometimes this statement bears the title “Certificate of Accuracy” or “Statement that Two Documents Have the Same Meaning.” Some translators will attach a Curriculum Vitae to the notarized statement.



Please note that any translator and any translation company representatives, regardless of credentials, may “certify” a translation in this way. A translator does not need to be “certified” in order to provide a “certified translation.” It is also important to realize that the Notary Public seal assures only that the signature is that of the person who presented him or herself to the notary. The Notary Public is not attesting to the accuracy of the translation.



What is a certified translator?



In contrast to many other countries, in the United States there is no federal or state licensing or certification for translators. There are some credentials available to translators working in some language pairs in this country, but they do not carry the same weight--in the market place or in the translation community--as federal licensing or certification in other countries.



The American Translators Association offers translator “accreditation” in some language pairs. ATA accredited translators are required to specify the language pairs and directions in which they are accredited. For example, a translator accredited in German to English is not necessarily accredited in English to German.



The Department of Social & Health Services in Washington State screens translators in several languages to translate DSHS materials. Translators who have passed this screening in a specific language pair may call themselves “DSHS Certified Translators.”



The Translators and Interpreters Guild, a national organization of independent professional language translators and interpreters, announced in September 2000 that it will be offering TTIG Certification for translators.



Please note that there are many languages for which there is no type of certification or screening available in this country. There are many excellent, experienced translators who are not accredited or certified.



In the United States it is not necessary to be certified or licensed in order to provide a certified translation for official use.\"





Direct link Reply with quote
 
andre_
United States
Local time: 19:22
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Steffen. May 22, 2003



2003-05-16 14:43 andre_ wrote:



I have been asked to translate 2 birth certificates from Spanish to English. Now, I need to know whether I need to be a lawyer to do these kind of translations or can I just by being a translator do it? Do I need some sort of seal or anything like a preparers statement? I look forward to hearing from everyone that can help. Thank you all in advance.



Direct link Reply with quote
 
andre_
United States
Local time: 19:22
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Melissa thank you for your time. May 22, 2003



2003-05-16 18:57 MField wrote:



I would find out the end use of that translation and then determine whether your credentials/ability are up to that standard.



Years ago, I had my husband\'s birth certificate translated into English for the application to the Immigration and Naturalization Service. At the time, I knew no one in the business and simply chose a translation agency out of the yellow pages. I specified that I needed a translation that would be accepted by the INS. Along with the translation, the agency provided a \"certificate of translation\" - basically just a notarized statement that the translation was true and correct to the best of their knowledge. That birth certificate was one of the few parts of the application that went through without a hitch.



In retrospect, I suppose it would have been better for me to first check on the INS guidelines for translations. I\'m sure they could be found somewhere on the internet or ordered by phone.



I hope this helps your decision.



Regards,

Melissa







Direct link Reply with quote
 
andre_
United States
Local time: 19:22
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Lucinda, thank you for your info... May 22, 2003



2003-05-16 19:29 Lucinda wrote:



Most countries need birth certificates and such to be translated by a sworn translator and then this translator at times also has to be registered by the consulate/embassy in question. So it is always good to ask and check carefully before accepting such a job.



Good luck!

Lucinda



Direct link Reply with quote
 
andre_
United States
Local time: 19:22
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Last, but not least: thank you! Once again, thank you everyone. May 22, 2003



2003-05-16 22:04 GoodWords wrote:



As Lucinda says, the client should tell you whether a sworn/accredited/certified translation is needed or not. If the answer is yes, this information may be relevant to you, since you are in the United States. However if the client needs the translation in a different country, the rules of the other country apply instead.



From www.notisnet.org/cliented/certification.doc:



\"What is a Certified Translation?



In the United States a certified translation consists of the following three parts:

1) The source-language (original) text

2) The target-language (translated) text

3) A statement signed by the translator or translation company representative, with his or her signature notarized by a Notary Public, attesting that the translator or translation company representative believes the target-language text to be an accurate and complete translation of the source-language text. Sometimes this statement bears the title “Certificate of Accuracy” or “Statement that Two Documents Have the Same Meaning.” Some translators will attach a Curriculum Vitae to the notarized statement.



Please note that any translator and any translation company representatives, regardless of credentials, may “certify” a translation in this way. A translator does not need to be “certified” in order to provide a “certified translation.” It is also important to realize that the Notary Public seal assures only that the signature is that of the person who presented him or herself to the notary. The Notary Public is not attesting to the accuracy of the translation.



What is a certified translator?



In contrast to many other countries, in the United States there is no federal or state licensing or certification for translators. There are some credentials available to translators working in some language pairs in this country, but they do not carry the same weight--in the market place or in the translation community--as federal licensing or certification in other countries.



The American Translators Association offers translator “accreditation” in some language pairs. ATA accredited translators are required to specify the language pairs and directions in which they are accredited. For example, a translator accredited in German to English is not necessarily accredited in English to German.



The Department of Social & Health Services in Washington State screens translators in several languages to translate DSHS materials. Translators who have passed this screening in a specific language pair may call themselves “DSHS Certified Translators.”



The Translators and Interpreters Guild, a national organization of independent professional language translators and interpreters, announced in September 2000 that it will be offering TTIG Certification for translators.



Please note that there are many languages for which there is no type of certification or screening available in this country. There are many excellent, experienced translators who are not accredited or certified.



In the United States it is not necessary to be certified or licensed in order to provide a certified translation for official use.\"







Direct link Reply with quote
 

Bin Zhang  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:22
English to Chinese
+ ...
Here I am. May 22, 2003

I don\'t know. Today I just did a certificate verification. They asked me to read the translation in both languages,and gave them my own report for the consistency for the translation, if not tell them the differences.I noted everything I found.I don\'t know my report is authorized or not. I just want to added,and just let you know that you are doing your job, translator\'s job, follow the work order\'s action, and you should get your payment.Don\'t worry about anything, anybody.....

Good luck


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

How make sure I do not get in trouble

Advanced search


Translation news





PerfectIt consistency checker
Faster Checking, Greater Accuracy

PerfectIt helps deliver error-free documents. It improves consistency, ensures quality and helps to enforce style guides. It’s a powerful tool for pro users, and comes with the assurance of a 30-day money back guarantee.

More info »
memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs