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Discounts on volume
Thread poster: Vincent MAELSTAF
Vincent MAELSTAF
Local time: 13:57
English to French
Mar 11, 2002

Any idea of a general \"rule of the thumb\" for assessing discounts on volume?



TIA,



Vincent



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Derek Smith  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:57
Italian to English
+ ...
Labour should not be subject to discounts Mar 11, 2002

I think it unfair to expect a person who makes a living through work to charge less for such work when it is estimated to be of long duration. However, if the work is very short, most people apply a surcharge. It will be almost as expensive to call a bricklayer to lay three bricks as thirty, but once daily rates have been specified, the craftsman is unlikely to be moved to sympathy or elect to go without his beer money simply because his employer announces that he intends to build a scale model of that very long wall whose original version is in China.

))))


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Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 07:57
German to English
+ ...
No discounts - we're not dealing in commodities Mar 11, 2002

As I and others have said in other forum threads, discounts are a big no-no. There are colleagues who offer discounts, but IMHO they are only shooting themselves in the foot.



A translation does not get easier because of its length and volume. Each new sentence, each new page, is unique.



On the contrary, large-volume translations should be made subject to stricter conditions (you have to work harder, longer hours, you have to turn down other, regular, clients, etc.): down payment upfront, the remainder to be paid in installments, and a rate/word that duly reflects the work and effort going into such a project.



Your accountant won\'t give you a discount for larger volumes (on the contrary). Your dentist won\'t give you \"volume discounts\", and neither will your lawyer, doctor, car mechanic, cleaning lady, etc.

[ This Message was edited by: on 2002-03-11 18:24 ]


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SusyZ  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:57
I can only share my experience Mar 12, 2002

Depends on the type of customer you are dealing with. First time customer and trying to get their business? or repeated customer... I have given discounts in projects larger than 20 pages and that has not only kept the customer happy but also brought back repeated business. Would I do that with every customer? NO. But I would consider it under the following circumstances:

1) you have no potential work coming up within the same period of time it would take to get the translation done

2) you know this customer will respect your fees in the future and you make a very strong statement that this is a ONE-TIME only EXCEPTION

3) text is of general nature and not specialized lingo





Good luck!


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Zonum
Spain
Local time: 13:57
Spanish to Catalan
+ ...
Mar 12, 2002

\"(...) But I would consider it under the following circumstances:

1) you have no potential work coming up within the same period of time it would take to get the translation done (...)\"



I wonder how do you predict that no other client is gonna call you for a translation?



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Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
Local time: 07:57
German to English
+ ...
You can't Mar 12, 2002

Quote:


On 2002-03-12 15:23, Zonum wrote:

\"(...) But I would consider it under the following circumstances:

1) you have no potential work coming up within the same period of time it would take to get the translation done (...)\"



I wonder how do you predict that no other client is gonna call you for a translation?





Offering discounts under any circumstances means selling yourself (and you expertise, experience, professional development, training, talent, ...) short. If one wants to be taken seriously as a professional, one will have to start acting like other professionals (lawyers, accountants, doctors, dentists, ...).

Be firm about your terms and conditions (others are too); accepting any kind of low-rate offer from some client, in the fear that there might not be another job for a long time, is characteristic only of those who provide substandard work (they are the only ones having to worry about repeat business). If you are really good, you won\'t have to worry about things like that (and that includes driving away a potential client).



If a potential client is not willing to accept my terms and conditions, it\'s their loss, not mine, because there are plenty of others willing to accept them (and these are the clients I want to work for!).

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Lucy Simpson
Local time: 12:57
Dutch to English
+ ...
Never! Mar 24, 2002

If you\'re lucky when working on a big job, you may get a deadline long enough to allow you to squeeze in a few extra jobs, but mostly taking on a project means you have to turn down several jobs in the meantime. So, if you\'re doing 15,000 words in a week, whether they be five small jobs or one big job, don\'t you want to know that you\'ve been paid the going rate? I took on one project last year that was so unutterably dull, a number of translators had refused to work on it. I named my price. On a couple of occasions I\'ve used that tactic with other agencies, when they\'ve refused to split a job. I\'ve just said if they want me to do it all, they\'ve either got to agree to my deadline or my price. If they\'re going to monopolise my services, I have to know that I\'m not going to lose out financially if I end up having to turn other business away.

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Barbara Schulten, MSc (OXON), DPSI
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:57
English to German
+ ...
Rates for translating Science Books May 13, 2002

I have the same problem. For somebody whom I thought might be my next supervisor, I translated a 40 pages book very cheap. I gave up on having him as a supervisor during this time. He offered me more translation jobs afterwards, but when he heard my normal price, his comment was: \'that is quite cheap\' but so far has not come back to me wanting another translation. The books are science-related, but meant for the general public, the translation was from English into German.



Now I might have the chance of translating a book related whole organism biology and ecology for the general public, which has more than 400 pages in DIN A4. Unfortunately, I don\'t know what to charge and would be very, very thankful for a reply via e-mail to: barbm23@yahoo.co.uk



Thank you very much.



Barbara


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