Mobile menu

Claim present to a client as expense?
Thread poster: MandyT
MandyT  Identity Verified
English to German
Oct 10, 2004

Hi,

I sometimes work with/for another freelance translator. She recently had a baby so I sent her some flowers. Can this be claimed as a business expense (in France)? Or are presents not considered as expense?

Thanks for your help

Dydy


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Seadeta Osmani  Identity Verified
Croatia
Local time: 18:26
English to Croatian
+ ...
And I thought... Oct 10, 2004

... presents were something you give to someone from your heart... especially flowers!

Boy, was I wrong...

Best of luck!

Seadeta


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Hans G. Liepert  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 18:26
English to German
+ ...
From heart Oct 10, 2004

Seadeta Osmani wrote:
... presents were something you give to someone from your heart... especially flowers!
Boy, was I wrong...
Best of luck!


I just read you get a monthly payment from the State of Croatia, if you have a child. And I thought you keep a child, because you love to.
Boy, was I wrong ...

Seriously, why shouldn't you deduct such expenses from your taxable income? If you would hate to give flowers, even the tax advantage couldn't convince you.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Seadeta Osmani  Identity Verified
Croatia
Local time: 18:26
English to Croatian
+ ...
Sure! Oct 10, 2004

Hans G. Liepert wrote:

[I just read you get a monthly payment from the State of Croatia, if you have a child. And I thought you keep a child, because you love to.
Boy, was I wrong ...

Seriously, why shouldn't you deduct such expenses from your taxable income? If you would hate to give flowers, even the tax advantage couldn't convince you.


Totally right, Hans!

That's why I would one day keep a child because of love, and not take any advantages for it.

That's why from the heart I send Christmas cards to my Clients, not reporting them as business expenses.

etc.

But got nothing to object to those who see every oportunity as a chance to give a little and gain a little (businesswise)

Seriously speaking, I would be really offended to know that someone sent me flowers and then claimed them as expense. Why? Because by the act of giving we make a personal point. If I wanted to sponsor someone, then it would be a business agreement. But the gifts and the way we chose and deliver them speak a lot about us. If I send someone flowers, that's for good luck, good health, or to say "I care". I do not need others to pay me because I have decided to be nice. But hey, that's just me, a plain girl speaking about plain things, not being too smart for business, anyway...

Very interested to hear what others have to say about it-- put yourself in a flower-receiver's shoes. Would you care only for the flowers, or for the whole picture behind them as well? Now here I go, I have "ethicised" the whole question. Shame on me!

Love from the shameless Croatia!

Seadeta

[Edited at 2004-10-11 00:18]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Narasimhan Raghavan  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:56
English to Tamil
+ ...
It is a legitimate deduction Oct 11, 2004

It comes under entertainment, gifts etc distributed in the course of business. And the recipient's views have nothing to do with it. He or she may not however know about it as it might hit business. All the diaries, keychains and other momentos given out by business houses are all deductible.

In matters fiscal think with your head and not heart. Otherwise you will have heartburn.

Regards,
N.Raghavan


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Rossana Triaca  Identity Verified
Uruguay
Local time: 14:26
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
Must be cultural... Oct 11, 2004

That's why from the heart I send Christmas cards to my Clients, not reporting them as business expenses.


I was quite surprised to read this. I think it must be a cultural difference, but from my point of view I would much rather declare the cards as a business expense and use the difference to buy the nice glossy ones than to pay that money to the revenue people.

The same applies to my colleague; if I can deduct the bouquet, I´d certainly use that money to accompany them with a beautiful stuffed animal. All in all, I know beforehand that I want to spend a certain amount considering the discount.

Thinking it the other way round, I would certainly be happy if I know any gift I received costed less to the giver; the value of the present remains unchanged to me and I would simply feel glad that it was not too burdensome on the other person!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Seadeta Osmani  Identity Verified
Croatia
Local time: 18:26
English to Croatian
+ ...
I understand your point Oct 11, 2004

Narasimhan Raghavan wrote:


In matters fiscal think with your head and not heart. Otherwise you will have heartburn.

Regards,
N.Raghavan


And I was wondering why I had heart problems lately... must be all those clients sending me "thank-you" notes by regular post and then claiming them afterwards

I just can't seem to find anything "fiscal" or "a matter of business" in sending flowers to someone after she gave a birth to a baby. But now I am scolding myself for being too private here.

Sorry, can't help but find this quite amusing... I did receive flowers once from a client of mine from Austria, it was my birthday and the delivery surprized me. Who knows, perhaps the state of Austria paid for my birthday flowers a cent or two

Of course, I am to mind my own business and not judge others. Apologize sincerely... And probably soon someone here will just tell me to shut up. And so I am shutting up



Seadeta


Direct link Reply with quote
 

nordiste  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 18:26
Member (2005)
English to French
+ ...
I am totally with you Seadeta Oct 11, 2004

Although I would not hesitate to claim business expenses for marketing material, like key rings, standard Xmas cards, calendar or notebooks and other little small "presents" I think I would never do it on such an occasion as a baby birth.

Well, I suppose it's just a mattter of feelings... (or maybe of being a woman ?)

By the way, I don't think you can claim business expenses for presents in France


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxPRen  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:26
French to English
+ ...
It's not about a lack of feeling Oct 11, 2004

Really, if you are working for a large company and take maternity leave, and the company sends you a nice big bouquet of flowers, do you think ''they'' (the president perhaps?) should pay for it out of his/her pocket to avoid an appearance of lack of feeling? Of course they're going to claim it as an expense!

If I take another translator out for dinner because she passed work along to me or did some other business-related favour, of course I'm going to claim it as a business expense, even if she is my best friend.

If you're going to incorporate your business, you have to separate yourself from your corporation, in your own mind. There is absolutely nothing wrong with claiming legitimate business expenses, even if the recipient is known to you.



[Edited at 2004-10-11 21:19]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Hans G. Liepert  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 18:26
English to German
+ ...
flower power Oct 11, 2004

Seadeta Osmani wrote:

... Seriously speaking, I would be really offended to know that someone sent me flowers and then claimed them as expense.


Why would a translator send flowers to a young mother, which happens to be a business relation? Does he/she usually send flowers to all young mothers? Without the translation business he/she wouldn't even notice her. And that should be strictly private?
By the way, if it is strictly private, you can't claim it as business exepense anyway.

If you get flowers from a big organization, which has you on its birthday list, do you throw them away?
If you talk on the phone to a customer and you finish with a babble on the weather, are you deducting your private minutes from the business talk - of course you don't, nor does the rest of the world.

The question was, is it tax deductible. And it is in most countries I know.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

PCovs
Denmark
Local time: 18:26
Member (2003)
English to Danish
+ ...
It's the thought that counts! Oct 13, 2004

Seadeta Osmani wrote:

I just can't seem to find anything "fiscal" or "a matter of business" in sending flowers to someone after she gave a birth to a baby. But now I am scolding myself for being too private here.

Sorry, can't help but find this quite amusing... I did receive flowers once from a client of mine from Austria, it was my birthday and the delivery surprized me. Who knows, perhaps the state of Austria paid for my birthday flowers a cent or two

Seadeta


First off: I do believe this is a deductable present - I would deduct it as a business expense, since the money is spent on a business relation.

And then: No need to shut up, Seadeta.
This just shows that there are different opinions.

However, I believe you should always think of a present in the spirit it was sent: someone cares for you, be it business related or personally.

It is not the actual cost of the present that matters, it's the thought. No co. can deduct so much of the cost of a present, that it stands to gain from it, therefore there must be an element of caring in giving the present.

Whenever I have received a co.-present, it has made me glad, and I have never thought about how much of the cost this co. was able to deduct.

The real value of a present is what it means to the receiver, not the cost of the present!

This is just how I feel about presents!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Edward Potter  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:26
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Why is it like this in the first place? Oct 13, 2004

Who set up the system like this anyway?

Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxsarahl
Local time: 09:26
English to French
+ ...
Frais de représentation Oct 15, 2004

that's what that kind of expense is called by the French tax authorities. A word of caution though, they don't really like frais de représentation, don't claim too much under this heading. Most people don't bother claiming a deduction for such small expenses, however, it's too much time and paperwork.

Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Claim present to a client as expense?

Advanced search


Translation news





LSP.expert
You’re a freelance translator? LSP.expert helps you manage your daily translation jobs. It’s easy, fast and secure.

How about you start tracking translation jobs and sending invoices in minutes? You can also manage your clients and generate reports about your business activities. So you always keep a clear view on your planning, AND you get a free 30 day trial period!

More info »
Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs