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Certified Translations in US. Some doubts.
Thread poster: Exequiela Goldini

Exequiela Goldini
United States
Local time: 00:32
English to Spanish
+ ...
Apr 15, 2005

I understand that in US a certified translation consists of a “Certificate of Accuracy” or “Statement that Two Documents Have the Same Meaning” notarized by a Notary Public. Are there any expections for this? For instance: Does the INS/State Department have special guidelines for the translations delivered to them? I have seen that some agencies say that they are certified by the U.S. government and that they certify and notarize translations according to INS/State Department
guidelines. Also, is it the same "certified" and "notarized".
Thanks for your help!


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Vladimir Dubisskiy  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:32
English to Russian
+ ...
a note Apr 15, 2005

I don't know whether it helps you or not but just to have a better perspective...

I live in Canada sometimes I provide certified translations of personal documents (into English) for INS - just translation and a certification letter. As far as I know those clients then have given it directly to INS without any notarization and it worked just fine (even with Canadian certification with probably no notarization). No questions / follow-ups from them so far.


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:32
English to Spanish
+ ...
My Practice Apr 15, 2005

I can only speak of my own practice since I do not know of any specific guidelines from anywhere in particular.

Because I am certified by the U.S. Federal Courts, I state that and the fact that it is a complete and accurate translation to the best of my ability. I then have that statement notarized and attach it to the translation along with a copy of the original, and I put a stamp (my own design) and initial on each page of the translation and copy of the original.

For academic documents I normally dispense with the notary and just provide a signed statement similar to the above.

I have had the U.S. Federal Court certification since 1981, and in all that time not one document has ever been returned for any reason, and clients I have had repeat contact with have never mentioned any problem.

So I guess it flies. That's all I can say.


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sokolniki  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:32
English to Russian
+ ...
Certified by Translator for INS Apr 15, 2005

I also translated the documents (birth certificates, etc.) for myself and other people to be submitted to the INS. Here is what the INS requires at the bottom of your translation:

Certification by Translator

I, ______________________________, certify that I am fluent (conversant) in the English and Russian

languages, and that the above document is an accurate translation of the document attached entitled

Birth Certificate.


Signature

Date Typed Name
Address

The notary certifies you as the person that provided the translation, and not the translation per se.


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:32
English to Spanish
+ ...
For Many Purposes Apr 15, 2005

For many purposes it appears that what Izabella says is enough. I think mine is often overkill, though it surely helps when documents are being presented in court (especially Federal Court) or to foreign jurisdictions.

There are no offical standards for translators in the U.S., so therefore there can hardly be any specific regulations on certification of translations.


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Luisa Ramos, CT  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 03:32
Member (2004)
English to Spanish
I have been worried sick Apr 16, 2005

That is, until I found this material.

I used to take my translations to a Court Certified Interpreter who would review it, stamp it, and charge me, of course. Just like Henry, he has never returned anything to me for correction.

I translate many documents for an attorney to file with the INS (BCIS, HSA) and all that is needed is the statement already mentioned.

Nevertheless, next May I will take the ATA test and next August I will take the oral exam for Court Certified Interpreter. Wish me luck!

---------------------------------------------------------
Here is the material I found. I am sorry I did not copy the source:

What is a Certified Translation?
In the United States a certified translation consists of the following three parts:
1) The source-language (original) text
2) The target-language (translated) text
3) A statement signed by the translator or translation company representative, with his or her signature notarized by a Notary Public, attesting that the translator or translation company representative believes the target-language text to be an accurate and complete translation of the source-language text. Sometimes this statement bears the title “Certificate of Accuracy” or “Statement that Two Documents Have the Same Meaning.” Some translators will attach a Curriculum Vitae to the notarized statement.
Please note that any translator and any translation company representatives, regardless of credentials, may “certify” a translation in this way. A translator does not need to be “certified” in order to provide a “certified translation.” It is also important to realize that the Notary Public seal assures only that the signature is that of the person who presented him or herself to the notary. The Notary Public is not attesting to the accuracy of the translation.
What is a certified translator?
In contrast to many other countries, in the United States there is no federal or state licensing or certification for translators. There are some credentials available to translators working in some language pairs in this country, but they do not carry the same weight--in the market place or in the translation community--as federal licensing or certification in other countries.
The American Translators Association offers translator certification in some language pairs. ATA certified translators are required to specify the language pairs and directions in which they are certified. For example, a translator certified in German to English is not necessarily certified in English to German.
The Department of Social & Health Services in Washington State screens translators in several languages to translate DSHS materials. Translators who have passed this screening in a specific language pair may call themselves “DSHS Certified Translators.”
The Translators and Interpreters Guild, a national organization of independent professional language translators and interpreters, announced in September 2000 that it will be offering TTIG Certification for translators.
Please note that there are many languages for which there is no type of certification or screening available in this country. There are many excellent, experienced translators who are not accredited or certified.
In the United States it is not necessary to be certified or licensed in order to provide a certified translation for official use.


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Exequiela Goldini
United States
Local time: 00:32
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks! Apr 18, 2005

Thanks everybody!

Your information has been very useful! I found out that my bank offers notary services free. I think that many bank have that service free of charge.

Exequiela


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