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Sworn translators & translations
Thread poster: Iza Szczypka

Iza Szczypka  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:04
English to Polish
+ ...
May 21, 2005

In Poland we have very strict regulations regarding authorisation to provide sworn translations. You need to be registered with the proper body (now the local court, soon the province authorities) and this frequently requires a candidate to have passed a qualifying examination. Such an authorisation implies translating to and from Polish since there is a lack of native speakers of other languages willing (and qualified) to become sworn translators.

However, I've just come across a PL>EN translation that is certified by an unauthorised translator. The certificate of accuracy is a standard one, but ...

My question is if such a translation would / should be recognised in the English-speaking countries? Seemingly everything is OK, but if checked, it would immediately show incompliance with Polish law. However, on looking through the threads here, I find it is a perfectly legal translation elsewhere.

My problem is that as a properly authorised (sworn) translator, I was asked to certify this translation (a certificate of birth and the like). Still, the certification is already there ... What should I do?

[Edited at 2005-05-21 08:43]


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Iza Szczypka  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 20:04
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Forgot to mention May 21, 2005

The content of the translation is perfectly compatible with the original, but the language "looks like" English ...

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liora  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 21:04
English to Hebrew
+ ...
Imho if you are sworn you are like a Notary May 21, 2005

Shalom
In Israel too we don`t have "qualified by the Law" translators. The verification of the translation is done by a Notary who charges rather well for this service.

Since you are qualified by the court, you should charge extra for your verification of the translation. In this case the Authority come from you ! And you are legal. If the translation is correct imho there is no problem.

I dont know what you should do if there are flaws in the translation. Just don`t accept it or tell them to have it corrected. If they ask *you* to correct it, charge extra by the hour or by editing rates, depending on the situation of the clients, and in Poland.

Have a nice day

Iza Szczypka wrote:

In Poland we have very strict regulations regarding authorisation to provide sworn translations. You need to be registered with the proper body (now the local court, soon the province authorities) and this frequently requires a candidate to have passed a qualifying examination. Such authorisation implies translating to and from Polish since there is a lack of native speakers of other languages willing to become sworn translators.

However, I've just come across a PL>EN translation that is certified by an unauthorised translator. The certificate of accuracy is a standard one, but ...

My question is if such a translation would / should be recognised in the English-speaking countries? Seemingly everything is OK, but if checked, it would immediately show incompliance with Polish law. However, on looking through the threads here, I find it is a perfectly legal translation elsewhere.

My problem is that as a properly authorised (sworn) translator, I was asked to certify this translation (a certificate of birth and the like). Still, the certification is already there ... What should I do?


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Tatty  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:04
Spanish to English
+ ...
Treat it as proof reading May 21, 2005

Hi,

All I would do personally is treat it as a proof-reading job. I would charge half my usual rate, check it, make any changes I believed to be appropriate and disregard the sworn statement from the other translator, and advise the client/agency that that part will not be included in the sworn document you stamp.

Good luck


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Burkhard Ziegler  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 20:04
Russian to German
+ ...
Certified translations for foreign authorities - check if they'll be accepted abroad Jun 4, 2005

Szanowna pani kolega,

I do agree with Tatty, you should treat this issue as a proof reading job and charge for this. If you sign and seal (I don't know if in Poland the stamp of a certified translator / tlumacz przesiegly is considered as a stamp or an official seal / sztempel lub piecziec) a translation made by another person you bear the full responsibility for the whole translation.

Furthermore, you (or your client) should ensure if a translation from Polish into English signed by a certified translator in Poland will be accepted by the foreign authority.

Some countries may require a certification by the part of your registration entity and possibly an apostille.

Other countries may require the translation to be certified by its consulate, especially the CIS.

If you speak German and/or Russian, you may consider having a look at http://www.proz.com/topic/31122 and/or http://www.proz.com/topic/31121.

Z nailepszimi pozdrawianiami
Burkhard Ziegler

[Edited at 2005-06-04 15:32]


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