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Permission to mention end client names?
Thread poster: Burrell

Burrell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:59
Member (2004)
English to Latvian
+ ...
Jun 28, 2005

Quite a lot of translators put a list of their end clients on their profile pages or websites. I would also like to do that as well known brand names would definitely add some weight to the content.
However I am not sure if I am supposed to do that. Lets say, you translate a project for agency A on a company B product. Can you mention company B (which is a brand name) on your profile page or CV, or do you first have to obtain permission from the agency?

Thanks in advance,
Burrell


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Jana Teteris  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:59
Latvian to English
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Ask the agency Jun 28, 2005

As far as I know there aren't any set rules on this, but I would definitely ask the agency concerned.

Jana


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Agnieszka Hayward
Poland
Local time: 08:59
German to Polish
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Do ask Jun 28, 2005

Jana Teteris wrote:

As far as I know there aren't any set rules on this, but I would definitely ask the agency concerned.


I fully agree with Jana.
Regards,
Agnieszka


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Margarita Gonzalez  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:59
English to Spanish
I obtain permission from the agency first. Jun 28, 2005

Burrell wrote:

Quite a lot of translators put a list of their end clients on their profile pages or websites. I would also like to do that as well known brand names would definitely add some weight to the content.
However I am not sure if I am supposed to do that. Lets say, you translate a project for agency A on a company B product. Can you mention company B (which is a brand name) on your profile page or CV, or do you first have to obtain permission from the agency?

Thanks in advance,
Burrell


Dear Burrell,
It was a question I asked myself many years ago, and ended up asking agencies if I could mention the end client. Interesting enough, not one agency refused, and now I ask in advance, even more so when projects are large and can take several weeks or months. But I'd love to hear how other colleagues have dealt with this.
Saludos,
Margarita Esther (MargaEsther)


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Austra Muizniece  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 09:59
Member (2004)
English to Latvian
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agreed Jun 28, 2005

Got to ask the agency, otherwise confidentiality agreement might be breached. Even if there's no agreement, many clients and colleagues would see that as quite poor work ethics.


However, I think you can still mention the line of the work and say that it's been for a major player in the industry...

[Edited at 2005-06-28 14:39]


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Andy Lemminger  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 00:59
Member (2002)
English to German
Just do it! Jun 28, 2005

If you did a translation for Nike, you can say that you did a translation for Nike. Just do it! Why should you ask agency Häberle for permission?

Of course it depends on the contract you signed before (if any).

But in most cases those confidentiality agreements say that you are not allowed to contact the client for a certain time and that you have to keep the information you receive confidential. You also shouldn't disclose that Nike is agency Häberle's client and you shouldn't say that Nike is your exclusive direct client but other than that I see no problem at all.


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gad
United States
Local time: 02:59
Member
French to English
You should definitely ask permission Jun 28, 2005

I actually find it best to list the nature of the business/projects, instead of having to list the names. But if you really want to list the name(s), yes you should without a doubt ask the permission of the agency. A friend of mine who is a project manager at a translation agency says that as an agency, they have to ask permission of the end client, for the use of ANY mention of the client's name. The translator should do the same, if for no other reason than to show professional respect to both the agency AND the end client.

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Kirill Semenov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 09:59
Member (2004)
English to Russian
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Always ask for permission Jun 28, 2005

My opinion: ask for permissions always, even if you worked for the company directly -- and, especially, if you did it via a third party like an agency or another kind of outsorcer.

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Burrell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:59
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English to Latvian
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TOPIC STARTER
My thoughts exactly Jun 28, 2005

[quote]Andy Lemminger wrote:

If you did a translation for Nike, you can say that you did a translation for Nike. Just do it! Why should you ask agency Häberle for permission?


Well, that is exactly why I posted the question. I thought there might be other opinions.

[Edited at 2005-06-28 15:13]


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RobinB  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 08:59
German to English
Just do it? Jun 28, 2005

Andy Lemminger wrote:

If you did a translation for Nike, you can say that you did a translation for Nike. Just do it! Why should you ask agency Häberle for permission?


Because you did the translation for Häberle, not for Nike, that's why. Suggesting that you have worked directly for a company you haven't worked directly for is not only unprofessional, it's absolutely untrue.

It's like Microsoft suggesting that they've sold directly to you, where in fact they sold to a PC manufacturer who bundled MS software with the PC they sold you.

This does not necessarily have anything to do with confidentiality agreements (though of course it might), but with truthfulness in publicity and advertising.

If you don't have express permission to name an end client, don't name them. Period. Even with direct clients, it's always good business practice to ask their permission first.

Basically, anybody who claims (without express permission) to have translated for a company they have not issued an invoice to is a liar. Pure and simple. And there are enough liars in the translation industry as it is.


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xxxMarc P  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:59
German to English
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Permission to mention end client names? Jun 28, 2005

Naming end clients without the intermediary's permission is a major breach of client confidentiality and very unprofessional, IMO.

Marc


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 00:59
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
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Don't do it. Jun 28, 2005

MarcPrior wrote:

Naming end clients without the intermediary's permission is a major breach of client confidentiality and very unprofessional, IMO.

Marc


I agree completely with you and others who have said the same thing. In contracts with agencies, keeping information confidential includes not only the content of the translation but also the client's name. Don't do it without asking first.


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xxxBrandis
Local time: 08:59
English to German
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I go with Mark Jun 28, 2005

MarcPrior wrote:

Naming end clients without the intermediary's permission is a major breach of client confidentiality and very unprofessional, IMO.

Marc
Brandis


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Burrell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:59
Member (2004)
English to Latvian
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TOPIC STARTER
Any refusals? Jun 28, 2005

MargaEsther wrote:

Dear Burrell,
It was a question I asked myself many years ago, and ended up asking agencies if I could mention the end client. Interesting enough, not one agency refused, and now I ask in advance, even more so when projects are large and can take several weeks or months. But I'd love to hear how other colleagues have dealt with this.
Saludos,
Margarita Esther (MargaEsther)




Actually, it would be interesting to know how many clients have refused this permission, if any.


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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:59
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
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Touchy matter Jun 28, 2005

There are too many cases in which the party needing the translation is not the one issuing the document. What guarantee do you have that the supposed end-client IS the end-client? (Think of tenders, for example.)

So I'd ask, and observe the outsourcer's indications. It's going to be an unpleasant surprise for someone who didn't know you from Adam to find out in print that they had contracted you, particularly in something confidential.


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