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Web pages on translators living abroad
Thread poster: Burrell

Burrell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:20
Member (2004)
English to Latvian
+ ...
Aug 30, 2005

I am putting together my business expenses for tax purposes and after contacting tax people I realised I need to prove why on earth I need anything special to keep up my native language (as I do not live in my native country) and why it is so important in my business.
Does anybody of you remember the best web pages whith discussions on translators living abroad and why they have to work hard to keep up their native language? I have read a lot of them but suddenly when I need them, I cannot find them. I am aware of the discussion on Proz a week or so ago. Also, I probably would welcome strong oppinions against translators living abroad (as this might persuade the "judges" that I have a valid point).

Cheers,
Burrell


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Kurt Porter  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:20
Russian to English
+ ...
Ask and ye shall receive. :) Aug 30, 2005

Burrell wrote:

I am putting together my business expenses for tax purposes and after contacting tax people I realised I need to prove why on earth I need anything special to keep up my native language (as I do not live in my native country) and why it is so important in my business.
Does anybody of you remember the best web pages whith discussions on translators living abroad and why they have to work hard to keep up their native language? I have read a lot of them but suddenly when I need them, I cannot find them. I am aware of the discussion on Proz a week or so ago. Also, I probably would welcome strong oppinions against translators living abroad (as this might persuade the "judges" that I have a valid point).

Cheers,
Burrell
http://www.proz.com/topic/36022?post_id=256430

Language is an evolving thing. One has to spend some time in the the TL country to pick up changes in vocabulary, slang and jargon. Only by spending time in country can one improve advanced listening, reading, writing and speaking comprehension skills. This is what we are, not what we do (smile).

Reminds me of the first time I waled into a bar in Russia several moons ago. I asked for a beer. Barman said, áóòèëî÷íîå èëè ðàçëèâíîå? I said to myself, "Hmm, ok if "a" is bottled, then "b" is draft." I said "ðàçëèâíîå." Next think you know, one draft coming up! Point being, one doesn't get those experiences in the source languge country.

Good luck with it!

Kurt


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Özden Arıkan  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:20
Member
English to Turkish
Hi Burrell Aug 31, 2005

I think this topic will be of help to you.

Good luck!


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Mónica Machado
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:20
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Same with me (I'm living in Portugal, though) Sep 1, 2005

Hi,

That's a very good question. I have the same problem in Portugal, since tax authorities do not accept any expenses with language institutes fees I am member of. They don't accept English reading books either. The only stuff they accept is dictionaries, grammar and similar material. From their own point of view reading books, listening to foreign programs or audio cassetes is not part of the translator's upgrading skills.

Well, in Portugal I am not surprised... since around here people think anyone can translate anything. Pretty advanced mind, don't you think?

Best regards,
Mónica Machado


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Burrell  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:20
Member (2004)
English to Latvian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Sounds familiar Sep 1, 2005

Mónica Machado wrote:

Hi,

That's a very good question. I have the same problem in Portugal, since tax authorities do not accept any expenses with language institutes fees I am member of. They don't accept English reading books either. The only stuff they accept is dictionaries, grammar and similar material. From their own point of view reading books, listening to foreign programs or audio cassetes is not part of the translator's upgrading skills.

Well, in Portugal I am not surprised... since around here people think anyone can translate anything. Pretty advanced mind, don't you think?

Best regards,
Mónica Machado




I know Portuguese bureaucracy pretty well, I lived there for three years. I usually managed to deal with things by being very insistant. I just would not leave till the solution was found, but it does take time and energy.
It is different in the UK, of course, but you still have to prove that anything more than dictionaries is necessary for your language skills. That is why I want to find discussions on this subject to illustrate that I have not made it all up to avoid paying taxes. I have found a couple of pages, but I know for sure I have read a lot more, as this subject obviously is important to me.
Maybe you can try the same approach? I know it might be difficult to persuade your tax man, as any evidence will only be in English, but if you are insistand and maybe right a big essay on what will happen to your business if you will not have the things you are paying for out of your pocket (like quality will deteriorate, clients starting to notice that and soon lack of any work because you cannot afford to pay for your work things out of your miserable wages - I might exagerate here but to the tax man you are just a person who earns easy money, because, as you said, anybody can translate.

Take care,
Burrell


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Mónica Machado
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:20
English to Portuguese
+ ...
"insist" that's the word! Sep 20, 2005

Hi,

You are quite right. And around here I am Miss "never give up"... but I keep fighting for things that Portuguese people just don't understand...

They seem to think I am too complicated.

Cheers
Mónica


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