For those unaware of translation work frauds
Thread poster: ICL

ICL  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 10:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
Jun 29, 2006

Hi,

Earlier today I tried posting the following message regarding translation work frauds, unaware about Proz.com's policy that does not allow company names be posted when discussing such topics.

So I was kindly informed that I could still post this message, as long as it has no names in it. So I am reposting it, simply because I think it is useful for those who might not be aware that such ugly frauds do happen (and continue happening more often than we think).

It didn't happen to me, but to colleagues somewhere else.

-----------------------------------------------

[“Someone by the name of xxxxx contacted me for a translation (of a text by Alphonse Daudet called "La Belle Nivernaise"). I was sent a 4500 euro cheque for the translation, an amount that was well above the fee I had stipulated. When I asked them why this was, I was told the extra money was to pay another translator who hadn't been paid yet and I was given a name and address were to send the money (2400 euros) by Western Union:

XXXXXXX
XXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXX
London XXXXXX
Telephone: +44XXXXXXX

I waited to see that the check I deposited was credited to account and then I sent the money. Unfortunately, I didn't know that the money that appears to be credited may be debited later if the check bounces, which it did because it turned out to be a fake. But I had already sent the money!
So I have been swindled out of 4500 euros.

The check, sent to me from England by a person called XXXXXXXX, was from the Natexis Banque Populaire in Paris 75002. The sum of money was written in English and the cheque was in the names of:
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
without specifying their home address.

The Natexis Bank confirmed that these cheques are fake.

I have reported this to the police in France.

I think it is important that people should be warned of this problem.”

- XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Here again the testimony of another of our colleagues:

“I am writing to inform you that I have received a message sent through your page in which I am asked to do a test translation for free (the last page of a text). The same mail has been sent to other translators in this language pair, asking them to translate other pages of the same text (marked between ***). We therefore think that this agency is trying to get the text translated for free and think you should know about it.

I also heard this agency has a history as a non-payer, but then I have no personal experience with them and I'm only repeating what has been said in different lists. They were even brought to court by a number of translators a couple of years ago.”]

[Edited at 2006-06-29 13:23]


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Patricia Lane  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 10:55
French to English
+ ...
one more reason Jun 29, 2006

to prefer wire transfers for non-local clients.
money isn't "safe" in pay pal until you take it out either!

keep your headlights on people!

cheers,

patricia


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Vito Smolej
Germany
Local time: 10:55
Member (2004)
English to Slovenian
+ ...
this is the latest variant of the Nigerian connection Jun 29, 2006

as if the check beyond the fee suggested would not be enough to raise suspicion, then at least the idea of translating Alphonse Daudet should.


If somebody sent you a 25k (with "10k is for the other guy" PasteIt attached) to translate Genesis, would you take the job?


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ICL  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 10:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Some do... Jun 29, 2006

Vito Smolej wrote:

If somebody sent you a 25k (with "10k is for the other guy" PasteIt attached) to translate Genesis, would you take the job?


You'd be surprised at the amount of people who might say "yes" to your question.

I guess these stories can basically be taken as a joke, but I have the feeling that frauds do happen to some people, and it seems lately more and more in the translation (freelancer) field.


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liora  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 11:55
English to Hebrew
+ ...
Proz.com's policy that does not allow company names be posted when discussing such topics. Jun 29, 2006

Shalom,
Sorry you lost so much money.
You should find a forum where you can put the name of the swindler at the title window /subject window and then tell the story of the swindling.
Whenever anyone would check about that person and or company in the search machine, that name would hopefully come up.
Liora


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Heike Behl, Ph.D.  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:55
Member (2003)
English to German
+ ...
General scam Jun 29, 2006

This approach is widely used in all kinds of scams, e.g. when selling stuff online such on Craig's list.

The person willing to buy something you offer (goods, services, anything) will (offer to) send you a check above the required amount with some more or less fishy explanation and ask you to send him/her the difference.

The psychology behind it is: If this person is willing to trust me with so much extra of his/her money, I can trust him/her as well. However, the check will bounce; it can take about 10 business days before a check is finally cleared.

Never ever accept any such deal, even when you're desperate to get rid of your old car or get a translation project.


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Lubain Masum  Identity Verified
Bangladesh
Local time: 14:55
Member (2006)
English to Bengali
+ ...
Sympathy Jun 29, 2006

Ivette Camargo López wrote:

Hi,

Earlier today I tried posting the following message regarding translation work frauds, unaware about Proz.com's policy that does not allow company names be posted when discussing such topics.

So I was kindly informed that I could still post this message, as long as it has no names in it. So I am reposting it, simply because I think it is useful for those who might not be aware that such ugly frauds do happen (and continue happening more often than we think).

It didn't happen to me, but to colleagues somewhere else.

-----------------------------------------------

[“Someone by the name of xxxxx contacted me for a translation (of a text by Alphonse Daudet called "La Belle Nivernaise"). I was sent a 4500 euro cheque for the translation, an amount that was well above the fee I had stipulated. When I asked them why this was, I was told the extra money was to pay another translator who hadn't been paid yet and I was given a name and address were to send the money (2400 euros) by Western Union:

XXXXXXX
XXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXX
London XXXXXX
Telephone: +44XXXXXXX

I waited to see that the check I deposited was credited to account and then I sent the money. Unfortunately, I didn't know that the money that appears to be credited may be debited later if the check bounces, which it did because it turned out to be a fake. But I had already sent the money!
So I have been swindled out of 4500 euros.

The check, sent to me from England by a person called XXXXXXXX, was from the Natexis Banque Populaire in Paris 75002. The sum of money was written in English and the cheque was in the names of:
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
without specifying their home address.

The Natexis Bank confirmed that these cheques are fake.

I have reported this to the police in France.

I think it is important that people should be warned of this problem.”

- XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Here again the testimony of another of our colleagues:

“I am writing to inform you that I have received a message sent through your page in which I am asked to do a test translation for free (the last page of a text). The same mail has been sent to other translators in this language pair, asking them to translate other pages of the same text (marked between ***). We therefore think that this agency is trying to get the text translated for free and think you should know about it.

I also heard this agency has a history as a non-payer, but then I have no personal experience with them and I'm only repeating what has been said in different lists. They were even brought to court by a number of translators a couple of years ago.”]

[Edited at 2006-06-29 13:23]


Dear Ivette Camargo López

I feel sorry and am expressing my sympathy for you. And thank you for warning all against this kind of fraud. Hope you will be more cautious in future so as not to fall in the trap of this fraud.

Lubain, Bangladesh


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 11:55
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Use a Yahoo forum for posting full details Jun 30, 2006

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pp_dist/

or

http://de.groups.yahoo.com/group/zahlungspraxis/
(German)

Sorry about your mischief!

Regards

Heinrich


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Vitaly Kisin  Identity Verified
Local time: 09:55
English to Russian
+ ...
translation frauds data Jun 30, 2006

Yesterday and today I received two e-mails from GoTranstators informing the community about the swindling company mentioned by Ivette and about a few more acting in the same vein. I can forward them to colleagues wishing to be aware of the danger
Vitaly, UK


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ICL  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 10:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
It didn't happen to me or to anyone I know Jun 30, 2006

Hello,

I am a bit surprised that some of you (I even got some emails from people expressing their sympathy) thought this happened to me. Did anyone notice the line where I say that it didn't happen to me?

Although I greatly appreciate your concern, maybe we all need to read these forum messages a bit more carefully, because this has turned like that party game where you start telling someone in the ear a story, then that person tells the next person the story in the ear, and so on, and at the end, you have a completely different story.

And yes, this message came from another fellow translator source, so I thought it would be worth posting here, especially the second part, about frauds with translation tests.

Maybe the fact that I commented about not having been able to post the original message with names confused some people.

And by the way, I think Proz.com doesn't allow this kind of messages with company names because obviously there might be some legal implications.

I made the mistake of not reading Proz.com's policy about this and of course the original message was blocked. I think the Blue Board is the place to post info of complaints about companies.

Anyways, my intention was more for the "newbie" freelancers, who might not be aware that these things happen.


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Vito Smolej
Germany
Local time: 10:55
Member (2004)
English to Slovenian
+ ...
Every second another sucker is born... Jun 30, 2006

You'd be surprised at the amount of people who might say "yes" to your question.


Check the following story from Newyorker

http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/articles/060515fa_fact

[Edited at 2006-06-30 12:45]


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