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Rule no 1: Never praise the translator!
Thread poster: Stephanie Wloch

Stephanie Wloch  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:06
Member (2003)
Dutch to German
Aug 1, 2006

I have found the secret rules of the world’s worst clients by Morgan McLintic (vice president of the PR agency Lewis) on a German blog
http://blog.handelsblatt.de/indiskretion/eintrag.php?id=737

Its on PR, but I recognize something regarding our business.
Especially point 1. , 7. 9. and 10.
"Some clients are better than others. Some are truly awful. Here are a few secrets of the world’s worst clients:
1. Never praise the agency – even if the team does a good job, don’t give any positive feedback – they’ll only go ]soft. Far better to maintain a dissatisfied scowl so the agency redoubles its efforts to please you. Even if they’re exceeding expectations, don’t let on that you’re pleased. In fact, give them a kick occasionally to keep them honest.
2. Don’t set targets – no doubt you’ll have your own KPIs but don’t let the agency know them since they’ll just stop as soon as they’ve been reached. Better to keep them guessing and on their toes.
3. Demand constant attention - the squeakiest hinge gets the most oil, so demand time beyond your budget. What’s the agency going to do? Say no and risk losing your account?
4. Never make up your mind – ask for options, ask for ideas, ask for timelines and plans, but never feedback on any of them or set a clear course of action. What if you’re wrong? You might get blamed – no, far better to spend time considering your options. Remember a campaign's a journey not a destination.
5. Brief light, brief late – the agency prides itself of being proactive and moving quickly, so you can afford to go to the wire before bringing them into the loop.
6. Delegate the bottom of your to do list – yup, good to find a home for all those stinkers which have been hanging around for so long.
7. Maintain radio silence – they’ll find you if it’s urgent.
8. Pass the blame – the agency is there to make you look good. As long as they do that, fine, but if things go badly, don’t forget they’re there to take the fall too.
9. Make sure you are the single point of contact – then you can control exactly what they do and what they know. They’ll just get confused otherwise.
10. Pay late – best to hold back in case something goes wrong, then you’ve got plenty of leverage. Better that the money’s in your account than the agency’s – their fees are too high anyway. As for that renewal contract - now there's something we can drag out since they'll probably ask for a bigger budget, and meanwhile they're busting a gut to please. Perfect.

If you follow these simple rules, you'll be the terror of your agency - and get the most bangs per buck, no doubt. "



[Edited at 2006-08-01 11:49]


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Stephanie Wloch  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 03:06
Member (2003)
Dutch to German
TOPIC STARTER
Original posting Aug 1, 2006

Here you can find the original Top10 list with comments
http://www.morganmclintic.com/pr/2006/04/how_to_be_a_ter.html

I have one comprehension question: – the agency prides itself of being proactive and moving quickly ** so you can afford to go to the wire before bringing them into the loop.**
What does he mean by that?

Regards
Steffi


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Levan Namoradze  Identity Verified
Georgia
Local time: 05:06
Member (2005)
English to Georgian
+ ...
I would rather prefer... Aug 1, 2006

I would rather prefer seeing 'agencies' rules' as regards to us freelancers. I suspect, they could be much heavier!

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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 03:06
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Wire services Aug 1, 2006

Tuliparola wrote:

I have one comprehension question: – the agency prides itself of being proactive and moving quickly ** so you can afford to go to the wire before bringing them into the loop.**
What does he mean by that?

Regards
Steffi


refer to electronic news, broadcast, usually on an urgent basis, to subscribers.

He's practically saying "inform everybody else before telling them". Anyway, they move quickly.


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xxxPRen  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:06
French to English
+ ...
Wait until the last minute Aug 1, 2006

Tuliparola wrote:

Here you can find the original Top10 list with comments
http://www.morganmclintic.com/pr/2006/04/how_to_be_a_ter.html

I have one comprehension question: – the agency prides itself of being proactive and moving quickly ** so you can afford to go to the wire before bringing them into the loop.**
What does he mean by that?

Regards
Steffi


I think in this context they mean waiting until the very last minute (until it's down to the wire or literally, almost at the finish line) before giving the agency the information they need.


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Patricia Rosas  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 18:06
Spanish to English
+ ...
down to the wire... Aug 1, 2006

I agree with Paula: it means the wire at the finish line of a race track.

In other words, the client can wait until the last second before requesting the agency's help, because he knows it will do whatever it takes to make sure the job is done right and on time.

BOY, DOES THAT ONE EVER APPLY TO FREELANCE TRANSLATORS!!

I just found this explanation of the origin of "down to the wire" --
The origin is indeed in sport, though not football but horse-racing. American racetracks in the latter part of the nineteenth century—before the days of cameras—had a wire strung across the track above the finishing line to help stewards decide which nose had got across the line first. An early example appeared in Scribner’s Magazine in July 1889: “As the end of the stand was reached Timarch worked up to Petrel, and the two raced down to the ‘wire,’ cheered on by the applause of the spectators. They ended the first half mile of the race head and head, passing lapped together under the wire, and beginning in earnest the mile which was yet to be traversed”. So, a race that was undecided until the very last moment was said to go down to the wire.

[Edited at 2006-08-01 16:09]


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PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 03:06
English to Polish
+ ...
Consultants Aug 1, 2006

I am now working on a long term assignment for a consulting company. Our client is a government institution...

I replaced "agency" with "consultant" and "campaign" with "project" and then sent it around the office.
Boy, did I get 'em howling...






...bitterly, because it's true to the letter (and spirit).

Cheers,
Pawel Skalinski


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Textklick  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:06
German to English
+ ...
Information going round in circles Aug 1, 2006

bringing them into the loop.**
What does he mean by that?

Regards
Steffi


Hi Steffi:

Example:

"Keep me in the loop" = "Keep me informed".
Standard (but loopy) bizspeak.

Another example: "Going forward, please keep me in the loop" = "In future, tell me what the hell is going on".

Tot siens
Chris


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