Mobile menu

Different Rates
Thread poster: Hipyan Nopri

Hipyan Nopri  Identity Verified
Indonesia
Local time: 10:05
English to Indonesian
+ ...
Nov 19, 2006

Hi fellow translators,
So far, I always charge different rates for local, national, and international clients. The local rate < the national rate < the international rate. This is based on the assumption that the potential risk and the productive cost on our part are greatly different in facing local, national, and international clients.
On this occasion I want to know if you have different or the same practice.
Thanks so much for sharing your experience.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxIreneN
United States
Local time: 22:05
English to Russian
+ ...
I don't understand Nov 19, 2006

What exactly is being assessed - a word typed in a certain geographical location or your knowledge and the lifestyle you've earned? Why work twice as much for a fraction of a price? Why make yourself busy for peanuts and lose serious offers? If you have an access to higher paying international clients, what in the world keeps you in the local market (except for possible noble charity reasons)? It is your time that should be priced at no less than, period. Or do you also produce some sort of "local" quality at a cosmic speed? Sorry, no pun intended.

I don't have any special rates for Russian local market and when offered a job, I respond - I'm a US-based translator. Please see if my minimum rate fits your budget. Normally it does not:-)


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Patricia Lane  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 05:05
French to English
+ ...
As Irene says and Nov 19, 2006

Also, using your own guidelines for rate setting, if your client is an agency, the location of the agency and the location of the end client who foots the "whole bill" can be very different. How do you deal with your own rates strategy then?

Personally, I have a minimum rate under which I won't even consider a project (unless I am doing pro bono work, in which case rates don't even come up!), and any firm quote requires I see the document, know the source and target formats, know the intended use of the translation, and the turn around time. Where the client is (direct or agency) has no impact on that calculation at all.

Kind regards,

Patricia


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:05
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
I have local and international rates Nov 19, 2006

Hipyan Nopri wrote:
So far, I always charge different rates for local, national, and international clients.


My local rate is about 1/3 of my international rate, but the reason for this has nothing to do with risk. The local people hereabouts simply won't pay international comparable rates, that's all.

I don't distinguish between "local" and "national" -- perhaps my country isn't big enough for that.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Stephen Rifkind  Identity Verified
Israel
Local time: 06:05
Member (2004)
French to English
+ ...
Local rates are set by local budgets Nov 19, 2006

I somewhat agree with Samual, but not as extreme. My local rates are 10%-20% less than my international rates. I obviously prefer the latter, but sometimes I have slack periods during which I am willing to compromise somewhat. I also try only to work with those local agencies which know how to get decent rates, and there are a few. They demand good work, but I can live with that.

In Israel too, local and national are synonomous. This truly is a small country.

Stephen Rifkind


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:05
English to Spanish
+ ...
Why work for them? Nov 19, 2006

"My local rate is about 1/3 of my international rate, but the reason for this has nothing to do with risk. The local people hereabouts simply won't pay international comparable rates, that's all."

ONE THIRD? Why even work for them, Sam?


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Lawyer-Linguist  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 04:05
Dutch to English
+ ...
Supply and Demand Nov 19, 2006

Henry Hinds wrote:

"My local rate is about 1/3 of my international rate, but the reason for this has nothing to do with risk. The local people hereabouts simply won't pay international comparable rates, that's all."

ONE THIRD? Why even work for them, Sam?



Because, in case you hadn't noticed, Samuel translates in the Afrikaans-English language pair and outside of SA (i.e. South Africa), the market is somewhat restricted.

A quick look at RAND-EURO or RAND-US DOLLAR exchange rates should also shed some light on the subject.

That said, Samuel, surely a client in Johies pays more than in Kakamas and Pofadder ?






[Edited at 2006-11-19 22:34]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nizamettin Yigit  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:05
Dutch to Turkish
+ ...
Local or international Nov 20, 2006

Dear all,

I understand some people may be using local rates. I understand that purchasing power of money may be different in different parts of the world.

I would like to ask:

Could you be giving low rates to your local person who may have been an agency or outsourcer who may do these translations for an international clients?

Or

How would you feel if you figure out that your local client which you do translation for 1/3 of your international rates is making 3 fold of your rate on the same translation because final client is an international client?

Regards,

N. Yigit


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Hipyan Nopri  Identity Verified
Indonesia
Local time: 10:05
English to Indonesian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Actually, I have the following situations: Nov 20, 2006

1. Inter-province purchasing capacity is extremely different. Purchasing capacity of the people in West Sumatra (the province where I live) is much lower than that in other provinces such as Riau, North Sumatra, East Java, not to mention Jakarta.
My international rate is US$0.12 per source word; to the national clients it is unreasonable, let alone to the local clients whose purchasing capacity is much lower.
In fact, international jobs do not come every month. Therefore, I compromise my rate to the local and national clients when I have no international jobs.
2. In Indonesia, translation agencies are generally based in Jakarta and Surabaya or a few other cities. I never work for any agency.
The majority of my local and national clients are individuals rather than commercial organizations. Most of them are post-graduate students and lecturers.
3. To local and national clients, I always require up-front payment or payment well before delivery. On the other hand, to international clients, the payment is within 30 days since invoicing.

[Edited at 2006-11-20 01:06]

[Edited at 2006-11-20 01:07]

[Edited at 2006-11-20 01:12]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxIreneN
United States
Local time: 22:05
English to Russian
+ ...
Funny Nov 20, 2006

We just had a lengthy discussion on the subject in the Russian forum.

A West-based Russian prozian was complaining about lazy underqualified Russians, all of them, just like that. Well, you know me, I had some warm words for the thread poster:-)

However, questions like what do her Western clients pay, or, and I'm quoting myself, "why exactly do they seek Oxford English in the Russian ends of the world", "why exactly do they keep stepping in one and the same mess like they don't understand the root of the problem", remained unanswered.

It has been proven that local agencies in "cheap" countries charge their Western clients 3-5 times more than they pay locals. Direct Western clients, rich and famous, do not feel ashamed to feed off the sweatshops either. What else to do with the third world, right?

No one should be supporting this new form of slavery. Maybe this should include Proz...

Unfortunately, I can testify that a certain (minor) portion of translations into Russian, especially technical translations, done by translators from run-down smaller towns with lower living costs and little choices for the price of 2-3 US cents/word can in fact be of exceptional quality. Lucky is the client who finds these guys, but oh so unlucky us. On the other hand, these translators eventually find their way to higher grounds, but the clients do not want to raise the price and stay with the rates, not with people. Again, those are rare finds, and I would be more than happy to remind Western clients that sweeping the backwoods can sometimes bring a jewel, but how often?

No wonder Russians characterize their agencies as "lickpennies", "bloodsuckers" etc.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:05
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Local rates in ZA Nov 20, 2006

Henry Hinds wrote:
ONE THIRD? Why even work for them, Sam?


Keep in mind that the local rate is not established by following the international rate. Local clients don't ask "what's the international rate" and calculate accordingly. No, the local rate has existed and evolved for many decades, in isolation. I suppose I could quote my international rate for local clients, but then they would expect a "value-added" service, which I may not necessarily want to provide. That said, at least one local agency pays me good rates, but then again, their end-clients are generally non-local.

Lawyer-Linguist wrote:
Because, in case you hadn't noticed ... outside of SA, the market is somewhat restricted.


Well, I sincerely believe that the international market for Afrikaans translators is far from saturated... but I'm only a part-time freelancer (although I'm a full-time translator), so I can't spend a lot of money on marketing.

A quick look at RAND-EURO ... exchange rates should also shed some light on the subject.


Yes, my statement about "one third" is based on a certain assumed rand-euro exchange rate. That said, I don't change either my local or my international rate when the exchange rate changes (some four years ago, USD 1 = ZAR 14, but this year USD 1 = ZAR 7).


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Lawyer-Linguist  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 04:05
Dutch to English
+ ...
Didn't say it was .... Nov 20, 2006


Well, I sincerely believe that the international market for Afrikaans translators is far from saturated.


I said it's "somewhat restricted", meaning in comparison to Spanish/French, etc.

Well, there just is no comparison and, in fact, much (please note: not all) of the AFR-EN work available on the international market is CVs, university transcripts, divorce decrees, etc. of people who've left for so-called "greener pastures" (often to their regret).

Like any market, it's a question of supply and demand.


[Edited at 2006-11-20 09:05]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 05:05
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
International clients for local texts Nov 20, 2006

Lawyer-Linguist wrote:
Well, there just is no comparison and, in fact, much ... of the AF-EN work available on the international market is CVs, university transcripts, divorce decrees, etc. of people who've left for so-called "greener pastures" (often to their regret).


A fair amount of offers for work is for this type of work, yes, but there is another category of work which may be more relevant to the original topic of discussion, namely texts produced by non-local companies for local consumption.

Quite a few of my international clients are agencies whose clients are multinational companies who prefer to have all their translations done at a single point, instead of in-country for each country. This has logistic advantages for the client, but such clients run the risk of getting translations done by expats who are no longer in touch with local speak. There is a gap, therefore, for local translators who work for non-local agencies, translating stuff for their local market.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Akoma
English to Russian
+ ...
Yes, I do have different rates, depending on the client's paying power Nov 20, 2006

Yes, I charge differently, and this segmentation is based on different factors, including the client's purchasing power (which very often correlates with the client's geographical location).
There are better paying clients around, but they don't always have work for me. I make my living as a translator, so I cannot afford to sit and wait when a really well-priced assignment turns up.

And economists I know tell me that there is no law of nature by which you can always get good jobs if you're good at what you're doing.))) Sometimes there are just aren't as many good jobs around as there are good jobbers.)))

No, I'm not ashamed of my segmented pricing: this is what most vendors of goods or services do, albeit in different ways. For instance, I pay 10 cents for a minute of calling on my cell phone, while other users pay 2 cents. Retailers give all sorts of discounts to various categories of customers. Why not me?


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Different Rates

Advanced search


Translation news





Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »
Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs