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info required by an agency
Thread poster: biankonera

biankonera  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 00:15
Italian to Latvian
+ ...
Mar 9, 2007

You live and learn thats true, but Im a bit puzzled by info required by one agency that has approached me for collaboration - they want to know the name of my parents. Why would they need that for? Do the names of my parents make me a better or worse translator? Does my payment depend on the fact if they will like those names or not? I dont get it, sorry. Maybe someone could explain this to me? Thanks:)
Stella


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:15
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
A strange request Mar 9, 2007

Hullo Bramasole,
Yes, it does seem a strange request. Perhaps they think the names of your parents would indicate your nationality and hence your mother tongue(s)?
Kind regards,
Jenny.


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the Train  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:15
English to Arabic
+ ...
I have realized something Mar 9, 2007

hi,
I have realized that on a form that a translator submits to an agency, the translator provides
His/Her phone number, e-mail address, home address, alternative address, sometime IP address, your birth date, your postcode, your tax card number, your insurance number, your mobile number, name of your bank, number of your account, your sort code, and even more...

You add to the above your parents name and the picture becomes very grim when you contemplate this;

What if they are not a translation agency..... I received a similar request on a form from an agency and when I called to verify that their contact numbers do exist, they simply put down the phone while I am talking and diverted their business land line to a mobile phone ** switched off.


[Edited at 2007-03-09 13:45]


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Claudia Krysztofiak  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 23:15
English to German
+ ...
Bureaucratic Mar 9, 2007

Sounds like enthusiast data collectors to me. Quite some years ago it was normal in Germany to add the names of your parents to your CV but it no longer is. Maybe in some countries or at some offices it still is.

I usually just do give the data I think necessary. If someone wishes to know more, they first have to explain why. It is a very reasonable question to ask and if you get a reply that is not a polite answer, steer away from them, they do not respect you and this will only cause problems in the future.

By the way: Neither my mother tongue nor my nationality nor anyone in my family is Polish (no offense meant, it's just a fact!), so names are absolutely no indicators for language.

[Bearbeitet am 2007-03-09 13:52]


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Can Altinbay  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:15
Japanese to English
+ ...
Beware Mar 9, 2007

the Train wrote:

hi,
I have realized that on a form that a translator submits to an agency, the translator provides
His/Her phone number, e-mail address, home address, alternative address, sometime IP address, your birth date, your postcode, your tax card number, your insurance number, your mobile number, name of your bank, number of your account, your sort code, and even more...

You add to the above your parents name and the picture becomes very grim when you contemplate this;

What if they are not a translation agency..... I received a similar request on a form from an agency and when I called to verify that their contact numbers do exist, they simply put down the phone while I am talking and diverted their business land line to a mobile phone ** switched off.


[Edited at 2007-03-09 13:45]


Banks in the US have always (OK, over 30 years) asked for your mother's maiden name as part of ID information. Many Web sites are now doing the same. That gives credence to Train's assertion. I'd be very very careful, as any information just helps someone rob you of your money or good credit.


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Can Altinbay  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:15
Japanese to English
+ ...
Let's see if anyone can tell... Mar 9, 2007

Jenny Forbes wrote:

Hullo Bramasole,
Yes, it does seem a strange request. Perhaps they think the names of your parents would indicate your nationality and hence your mother tongue(s)?
Kind regards,
Jenny.


I have news for anyone who believes this. My father's name is Ahmed and my mother's is Ravile (maiden name omitted, see my other post). What can you tell me about their linguistic capabilities, and mine?


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Aurelia R
France
Local time: 23:15
English to French
+ ...
Father's first name Mar 9, 2007

Hi Bramasole,
When I was in Greece, the company I worked for asked me for my father's first name -apparently it's a standard practice. And in every document I received, I was always addressed as "Aurelia R., Francis" -contract, reference letters, pay slips, etc.

Perhaps it was to avoid some kind of confusion?
But why the first name? And why not my mother's name? Funny...

Have a nice day,

Aurelia


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Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:15
Dutch to English
+ ...
Put unknown Mar 9, 2007

And see what happens...
Or not applicable (that should be funny)


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Andrea Riffo  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 19:15
English to Spanish
... Mar 9, 2007

Marijke wrote:

And see what happens...
Or not applicable (that should be funny)


It already is!:lol::lol::lol::lol:


On a more serious note, I has no idea that US banks asked for your mother's maiden name...

Stella, I had never heard that before, it strikes me as really odd since I cannot think how that information would be helpful. Still, perhaps this is usual (or not-so-strange) practise in some countries, so maybe if you told us where the agency is from someone can give you a more specific answer.

On the subject of odd requests, this morning I was looking at an (reputable) agency's instructions for freelancers who wish to work with them, and one of them was to e-mail a photocopy of the valid passport.

I guess this might be in order to verify the translators' identities, but I still find it somewhat odd and way too risky...

Is this common practise?

Andrea


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:15
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
That's not what I meant Mar 9, 2007

Can Altinbay wrote:

Jenny Forbes wrote:

Hullo Bramasole,
Yes, it does seem a strange request. Perhaps they think the names of your parents would indicate your nationality and hence your mother tongue(s)?
Kind regards,
Jenny.


I have news for anyone who believes this. My father's name is Ahmed and my mother's is Ravile (maiden name omitted, see my other post). What can you tell me about their linguistic capabilities, and mine?


Can,
I didn't mean that I myself thought that getting parents' names was a good way of ascertaining someone's mother tongue, only that the agency might (wrongly) think so - but I agree that the question seems irrelevant (if not suspicious) and I wouldn't answer it. Or I'd put "deceased".
Regards,
Jenny.


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Gerard de Noord  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 23:15
Member (2003)
German to Dutch
+ ...
Polish agency? Mar 9, 2007

In my experience, Polish agencies have to comply with weird pre-EU rules.

Regards,
Gerard


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Can Altinbay  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:15
Japanese to English
+ ...
And *I* didn't mean to... Mar 9, 2007

Jenny Forbes wrote:


Can,
I didn't mean that I myself thought that getting parents' names was a good way of ascertaining someone's mother tongue, only that the agency might (wrongly) think so - but I agree that the question seems irrelevant (if not suspicious) and I wouldn't answer it. Or I'd put "deceased".
Regards,
Jenny.


Oh, I understood that it wasn't *you* who thought that way. Sorry if I didn't make myself clear.

How about "N/A"?


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megane_wang  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 23:15
English to Spanish
+ ...
It's not their business... Mar 9, 2007

I think you don't need to provide any personal information that is not strictly related to a customer - provider relationship.

I think that politely asking why they need this info and suggesting that you will not provide any personal information unless it is really needed should be enough: you are a professional, not a little child answering to every single question done by a teacher.

Without a good reason I would not provide any data I don't find appropriate. As others have already suggested, you never know who you are talking to.

Good luck!

[Edited at 2007-03-09 22:03]


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Agnieszka Hayward
Poland
Local time: 23:15
German to Polish
+ ...
Maybe Polish, maybe otherwise Mar 11, 2007

Gerard de Noord wrote:

In my experience, Polish agencies have to comply with weird pre-EU rules.

Regards,
Gerard


Gerard, I don't know how many Polish agencies - and what type (government related?) you deal with, but to date I had NO request from an agency in Poland to provide my parents' names, or - come to that - any data irrelevant to the job.
Yes, Poland sometimes strikes even me as a peculiar place, but for reasons not even remotedly related to our line of business

And... weird agencies can hatch anywhere in the world... believe me.


As to bramasole's dilemma, my idea would be to.. sod it, as hinted above, plainly ignore the request, leave the spaces blank. None of their business.


Thumbs up,
Agnieszka


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Actavano  Identity Verified
Dominican Republic
Local time: 18:15
Member (2006)
Spanish to Italian
+ ...
Necessary information Mar 11, 2007

The problem here is how much information you could give and how much you must really give. The kind of information you must give is necessary in order to identify you without any doubt. Not more and not less than that. You could give more information but you must not, since it doen`t add any further help for your identification. First of all, identity theft is nowadays one of the most common crimes, and criminals of this branch are always looking for information, that can be related with secret codes or access to accounts when codes are forgotten. Without going further into it, I`ll tell you something that happened to me, not later than yesterday: I forgot the access code of my paypal account. Guess what kind of information I needed in order to get access to my account? My mother`s family name! It is as simple as that!

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