Mobile menu

Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Source or Target?
Thread poster: Matthew Holway

Matthew Holway  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 05:36
Italian to English
+ ...
Nov 2, 2007

Obviously, being paid on word count - any freelancer would like to be paid on whatever's greater - SL or TL.. What does everybody prefer to be paid on - given the choice?? I've noticed that at times source can be higher depending on the lang' pair. What are your lang pairs? (source and target)

I prefer payment on Target (It,sp,fr>En).
Matt Holway


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Vadim Poguliaev  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 06:36
English to Russian
Source Nov 2, 2007

More transparent and allows to evaluate the project before it actually starts.
+ rate per target is almost impossible to use for multilingual projects, as well as with CAT tools.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Matthew Holway  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 05:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
source Nov 2, 2007

So you just ask for source? - what if the target is quite a bit more than the source?

Direct link Reply with quote
 
teju  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:36
English to Spanish
+ ...
Source Nov 2, 2007

This is the only way to tell the client how much the translation will cost. Most people don't like to hire you without a set amount agreed beforehand. In my case, most of what I do is English to Spanish, and the Spanish translation always ends up being about one third longer than the source document. I take this into account when I decide on the rate per word.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:36
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
It depends whether or not the source document can be counted Nov 2, 2007

As a rule, I charge per source if the source document can be reliably counted, but often it can't be - PDFs, photocopies of customs declarations, certificates, and so on. If the source document can't be reliably counted, I charge per target, with the client's prior agreement.
In my language pairs (French and Spanish to English), the source document is usually (but not absolutely always) slighty longer than the target document.
The difference in word count is minor in my case and I've seldom if ever had any disagreements about this.
Regards,
Jenny.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

patyjs  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 21:36
Spanish to English
+ ...
Source Nov 2, 2007

I prefer source because, as well as other considerations already mentioned, I don't have to worry about how my wording affects the cost.

I only really work Spanish to English so obviously source is greater, but, I do have agents who want to pay target (I'm sure they charge the client source).

Best,

Paty


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tim Drayton  Identity Verified
Cyprus
Local time: 06:36
Turkish to English
+ ...
Target Nov 2, 2007

It makes a big difference when translating from Turkish into English, a process that leads to an expansion in the word count by about two-thirds. Turkish is an agglutinating language in which strings of suffixes are added to words, and these suffixes often correspond to separate words in Western European languages. For example, one word, masamızda (masa=table, mız=our and da=on) means "on our table" in English (three words). Working by word count is a constant bone of contention in this pair. It would be nice to operate in a world where character-based criteria such as the German 55-character Normzeile were more widely accepted, because there is much less variation between the source and target character count in my lanaguage pair, but unfortunately the trend everywhere seems to be in the direction of measuring volume by the word.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tim Drayton  Identity Verified
Cyprus
Local time: 06:36
Turkish to English
+ ...
I agree Nov 2, 2007

teju wrote:

This is the only way to tell the client how much the translation will cost. Most people don't like to hire you without a set amount agreed beforehand. In my case, most of what I do is English to Spanish, and the Spanish translation always ends up being about one third longer than the source document. I take this into account when I decide on the rate per word.


I fully agree with you. My favourite way of working is to inspect the text and quote a price for doing the job as a whole. Then I can take various factors into account such as the complexity of the text, the amount of technical terminology, and the standard of translation required. Why do we insist on turning our work into a commodity that can be measured by a single crude indicator of volume?


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Vadim Poguliaev  Identity Verified
Russian Federation
Local time: 06:36
English to Russian
so what?-) Nov 2, 2007

Matthew Holway wrote:

So you just ask for source? - what if the target is quite a bit more than the source?

It's simple and transparent practise, unlike the alternative. See all the answers.
Some agencies pay per standard target page (1800 symbols with spaces), but their number is constantly decreasing with the adoption of CAT.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Matthew Holway  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 05:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
page pricing Nov 2, 2007

I must admit I find the "page" or "cartella" pricing structure often used here in Italy very hard to follow - and irregular as when does one page have the same amount of work as another?! At the moment we are insisting on word count. - though a few Italian agencies won't accept it! - normally those who want to pay us around 0.03€ a word so I couldn't really care less.
Matt


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Steven Capsuto  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:36
Spanish to English
+ ...
Source Nov 2, 2007

It eliminates questions in the client's mind, such as "Is the freelancer deliberately padding the wording to get more money?"

If you're translating in a language pair that produces expansion, compensate for that in the per-word rate.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Ledja  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:36
Member (2008)
English to Albanian
+ ...
Source. However... Nov 2, 2007

I have always charged according to the source wordcount and believe this to be fairer, as, from an outsources point of view, any translator may, for example, choose to translate certain words or phrases in different ways, should this be in the favour of a larger target wordcount.

There has been one instance, however, when I wasn't happy at all counting from the source. The project was delivered in PDF, different documents ranging from certificates to handwritten statements, all scanned, some so old and worn out that I had to decipher the handwriting, and so on and so forth. Needless to say, a PDF converter was useless, and I had to add many footnotes and textboxes, stating what appears here and there and what was illegible. Luckily for me, the company recognised all of these extra efforts and presented me with a larger wordcount that I had claimed, which I can only assume came from the target text.

Just this once... but, there may be more where that came from! So I am not definitely sticking to source.

Best,
Ledja


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Matthew Holway  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 05:36
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
PDF/OCR Nov 2, 2007

Ledja Derveni wrote:

I have always charged according to the source wordcount and believe this to be fairer, as, from an outsources point of view, any translator may, for example, choose to translate certain words or phrases in different ways, should this be in the favour of a larger target wordcount.

There has been one instance, however, when I wasn't happy at all counting from the source. The project was delivered in PDF, different documents ranging from certificates to handwritten statements, all scanned, some so old and worn out that I had to decipher the handwriting, and so on and so forth. Needless to say, a PDF converter was useless, and I had to add many footnotes and textboxes, stating what appears here and there and what was illegible. Luckily for me, the company recognised all of these extra efforts and presented me with a larger wordcount that I had claimed, which I can only assume came from the target text.

Just this once... but, there may be more where that came from! So I am not definitely sticking to source.

Best,
Ledja


I must admit My "red alarm bells" start ringing when I get badly scanned PDFs now (are they actually using scanners or digital cameras?!) - I had a nasty/difficult job/client (in that order!) a bit back. - moaned about the final format not being exactly the same as the PDF - nearly impossible of course (or at least included a good few hours work ON TOP of the translating work as there were 30 awkwardly laid out pages for a theater play) On a side note as far as OCR software is concerned I now prefer IRIS REDEYE (PRO 9) to Omnipage.. It seems to be far more accurate. (better re adjusting and table recognition etc)
Warm regards from Sicily!
Matthew


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 21:36
English to Spanish
+ ...
Source, sometimes target Nov 2, 2007

As others have said, the source count offers the great advantage of being able to quote a price beforehand. Of course with paper documents, non-editable electronic versions like PDF, etc. and especially those in a difficult format it is sometimes not easy to establish a reliable count. However, in most cases I can do fairly fast with good accuracy.

I translate EnglishSpanish, both directions. However, even though Spanish can turn out to be longer, I always charge the same rate; there does not seem to be much extra work involved actually.

Moreover, I do a lot of paper legal documents from Spanish to English and use the target count. My experience with these is that the word count in both languages tends to be very close to the same number. With other kinds of material the difference can be variable.

I guess many of us use source or target depending on the languages and type of material involved, and there are some languages (Turkish was mentioned and German is another) where the difference in word count with another language can be quite significant, thus requiring other pricing strategies.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 05:36
Member (2006)
Dutch to German
+ ...
Why different pricing strategy? Nov 2, 2007

Henry Hinds wrote:


I guess many of us use source or target depending on the languages and type of material involved, and there are some languages (Turkish was mentioned and German is another) where the difference in word count with another language can be quite significant, thus requiring other pricing strategies.


Dear Henry,

I can't quite see why a difference in word count would lead to a different pricing strategy. Imho, the question of whether to charge per source or target word is not a question of the individual languages involved. Instead, the rate for a specific language direction should reflect differences in word count. If translating from language A to language B expands the text by 30%, and my source word rate is X, than my target word rate in this language direction should be approx. 77% of X.

Just my 2 cents
Erik


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Source or Target?

Advanced search


Translation news





Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs