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How is a translation memory created?
Thread poster: Astrid Elke Witte

Astrid Elke Witte  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 13:27
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
Sep 3, 2002

I would like to know how to create a translation memory, using any programme at all. The programme could be, for example, Microsoft Access, or any other database programme available.



On trying to use a CAT tool for the first time, I encountered the problem that I wished to import my own document of collected terms. However, this is only a word document at the moment, set out as a vocabulary list in two columns. I presume, therefore, that it is not in a form that a translation programme or CAT tool of any kind could access and use. Surely, a particular kind of database needs to be created, to import into the programme used. Can anyone let me into the secret of how this is done? I am entirely new to the subject of using CAT tools. I now have one, but, without a translation memory, it is not of great help.


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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 13:27
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
Don't confuse translation memory with terminology management Sep 3, 2002

Translation Memory and terminology management are two very different things. What you need to do with your collected terms is to import these into your terminology database. I don\'t know what CAT tool you are using, but if you\'re using Trados than this would be the Multiterm database.



However, before you import your terms, you need to get the file (and your terms) into the correct format. You will probably find information on what format they have to be in under the help function, imports.



Hope this helps, but it\'s kinda hard to give you a detailed explanation of what to do without knowing what CAT tool you\'re using.



Alison


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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 13:27
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
Translation memory... Sep 3, 2002

To answer your other question, a translation memory comprises so called \"segments\" - e.g. a chunk of German with the corresponding chunk of English translation.



For example, you get the sentence \"Der Hund stand vor der Tür\". You translate this (using your CAT tool) as \"The dog stood in front of the door\". Your CAT tool saves this in its memory. Two weeks later, you get the same sentence again. Your CAT tool automatically suggests \"The dog stood in front of the door\" as a translation. A few weeks later, you get the sentence \"Die Katze stand vor der Tur\". Your TM will tell you (hopefully!) that you recently had a similar sentence and provide you with your original translation. All you then have to do is change \"dog\" to \"cat\" in your translation and off you go.



A translation memory is created by working with your TM, saving all the segments as you go. Or you can import segments that have already been \"aligned\". This means that you have a German file and an English file, and you go through using a special alignment program, sentence by sentence, and tell the TM what chunks in German go with what chunks in English.



HTH



Alison



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Marijke Mayer  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 13:27
Dutch to English
+ ...
please narrow down what you're aiming to do. Sep 3, 2002

As Alison correctly indicated, don\'t unnecessarily complicate a basically easy matter. To answer your question \'using any program at all\', in case you don\'t know which Translation program you want to use and/or purchase, you would be wise to start an Excel sheet as a basis for terminology management, then to save that in a certain sequence into a *.txt file. I can mail you instructions how to then import that into a terminology management program such as MultiTerm in Trados, i.e. just words.



As far as phrases are concerned, these go into translation units (TUs) with source and target languages and other information for sorting purposes later. As sentences are typically longer, these are harder to maintain in an Excel spreadsheet, although it is possible of course, and you follow basically the same procedure to import the following text unit (*.txt) into an existing or new translation memory. This one happens to be in Trados format, but it is possible to use that for, for instance, Déjà Vue or other translation programs. By the way, I would not advise you to use Access, it\'s way too complicated and crashes easily, for what you need, Excel will do the trick and it\'s simple to use.





27082002, 00:00:00

MARIJKE

native English

Proz

debt and equity placements

het onderbrengen van leningen en het uitzetten van aandelen



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