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Yu Hsin Wang won the latest translation contest
Thread poster: lbone

lbone  Identity Verified
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Apr 18, 2008

http://www.proz.com/?sp=contests&sp_mode=current&sp_sub_mode=view_language&contest_id=13&ctlid=638

S/he seems to be a veteran, but is seldom on this forum.


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redred  Identity Verified
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She or he Apr 18, 2008

lbone wrote:

S/he seems to be a veteran, but is seldom on this forum.


赢家是男的吧,长头发是艺术气质。以前有个同事来自电视台,后来也回了电视台工作,从事广告策划类,形象也是长头发。许多艺术业者基本是长头发的打扮。


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peiling  Identity Verified
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redred Apr 18, 2008

你还在研究这'是男还是女'的问题啊?

话说回来.恭喜Yu-hsin!


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redred  Identity Verified
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Congratulation Apr 18, 2008

不是在研究,而是Ibone提到。

Congratulate Yu Hsin Wang。因为我也投了#3812一票。

[Edited at 2008-04-18 01:26]


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Wenjer Leuschel  Identity Verified
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扑朔迷离 Apr 18, 2008

诗经里怎说的?扑朔迷离?

这次的文本蛮有意思的,要翻译得漂亮并不容易。不过,我没有选择任何人的翻译。有些翻译的文字流畅优美,但对原文的理解或语言韵律的掌握,却仍有某些应该避免的瑕疵。

比方说,"But the kindest and toughest ropes of all are probably to be found in some suburban semi-detached with rowdy children and a woman who never allows the dust to settle for too long."

翻译成“不過,也許和吵鬧的孩子和一個永不讓生活風平浪靜的女人,住在某個郊區的雙拼別墅裡,就是世界上最親切和最牢固的繩索。”

相较于“但是,最温柔又最牢靠的绳索大概可以在近郊的某栋镇屋里找到,那里有喧闹的顽童和容不得灰尘、勤于扫除的良家妇女。”

这两者都有些问题。前者误解了"a woman who never allows the dust to settle for too long",又在“也許和吵鬧的孩子和一個永不讓生活風平浪靜的女人”里,在含有对等语词的同一段片语中,重复使用了“和”这样的连接词;毕竟with和and两者的语法作用(syntactical function)确实有很大的不同。后者则没有在原文的语意范围内找到恰当的中文表达,以至于添加了“顽”和“勤于扫除的良家”这样的措辞;原文的理解大致正确,只是添加的措辞衍生出原本没有的意思。

总之,要把最后那句话里“家=温和的枷锁”所传达的“平常即是福”翻译得恰到好处,非常不容易。我看到文本就决定不敢参与竞赛,因为深知“情色”的麻烦难以言表。所有的参赛者都达到一定的水平,相当难得。无论得到多少点数,是否亮出名姓,我恭喜每一位!


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xiaoyanchen
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never allows the dust to settle for too long Apr 18, 2008

Wenjer Leuschel wrote:

诗经里怎说的?扑朔迷离?

这次的文本蛮有意思的,要翻译得漂亮并不容易。不过,我没有选择任何人的翻译。有些翻译的文字流畅优美,但对原文的理解或语言韵律的掌握,却仍有某些应该避免的瑕疵。

比方说,"But the kindest and toughest ropes of all are probably to be found in some suburban semi-detached with rowdy children and a woman who never allows the dust to settle for too long."

翻译成“不過,也許和吵鬧的孩子和一個永不讓生活風平浪靜的女人,住在某個郊區的雙拼別墅裡,就是世界上最親切和最牢固的繩索。”

相较于“但是,最温柔又最牢靠的绳索大概可以在近郊的某栋镇屋里找到,那里有喧闹的顽童和容不得灰尘、勤于扫除的良家妇女。”

这两者都有些问题。前者误解了"a woman who never allows the dust to settle for too long",又在“也許和吵鬧的孩子和一個永不讓生活風平浪靜的女人”里,在含有对等语词的同一段片语中,重复使用了“和”这样的连接词;毕竟with和and两者的语法作用(syntactical function)确实有很大的不同。后者则没有在原文的语意范围内找到恰当的中文表达,以至于添加了“顽”和“勤于扫除的良家”这样的措辞;原文的理解大致正确,只是添加的措辞衍生出原本没有的意思。

总之,要把最后那句话里“家=温和的枷锁”所传达的“平常即是福”翻译得恰到好处,非常不容易。我看到文本就决定不敢参与竞赛,因为深知“情色”的麻烦难以言表。所有的参赛者都达到一定的水平,相当难得。无论得到多少点数,是否亮出名姓,我恭喜每一位!
I think the winner is the only translator who got this phrase "never allows the dust to settle for too long" translated into correct meaning though the tone was stretched a bit too strongly. I don't know why this should be translated into something like cleaning the house to make it free from dust. This phrase is used metaphorically here, with its meaning almost the opposite to keeping the house dustfree. Hence it goes with the adjective "rowdy"(both are negative). Even you take it to mean literally, "never allowing the dust to settle" would mean "making it dusty" because if you never want the dust to settle, you have to stir up the dust. Again, I am saying this phrase is used metaphorically here and I think the winner's translation reflects the main theme of the author. If you check the original source article, you can see clearly where the author stands.


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Shaun Yeo  Identity Verified
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佩服佩服 Apr 19, 2008

Yu Hsin Wang译得高明,果然是好手;
Xiao Yan Chen评得中肯,尽显真功夫。

佩服佩服!


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Wenjer Leuschel  Identity Verified
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My doubt Apr 19, 2008

The phrase "never allowing the dust to settle" could be an 一语相关. It could mean that the woman always looks for something exciting in family life and/or dilligently looks after the family. Both meanings are definitely to be covered by 永不让生活风平浪静.

The author stands obviously not for "one night": How the gods thronged the balconies of heaven to see the consequences of Helen's betrayal! And your friends are watching too. Your antics have put the shine on many a late-night conversation.

It is interesting to figure out how the translators of other language pairs resolve the puzzle in their languages:

Japanese:
しかし、もっとも 親切でありながらもっとも苛酷なロープはたぶん郊外の一軒家に、うるさい子供達と埃が溜まることを絶対に許さない女のところにあるだろう。

Comment: More of looking after the family, isn't she?

Spanish:
Pero las ataduras más benévolas y resistentes probablemente se encuentran en un pareado de las afueras, lleno de niños escandalosos y con una mujer que nunca permite que se acumule demasiado polvo.

Comment: Does she let dusts accumulate?

French:
Toutefois, les plus douces et les plus solides de toutes les amarres, cherchez-les plutôt du côté de la banlieue, dans quelque maison mitoyenne, aux côtés d'enfants turbulents et d'une femme qui ne laisse jamais rien s'empoussiérer trop longtemps.

Comment: What does she never let for a long time?

German:
Aber die angenehmsten und doch stärksten Fesseln findet man wohl in einem Reihenhaus am Stadtrand mit übermütigen Kindern und einer Frau, die nie Langeweile aufkommen lässt.

Comment: What kind of a woman who doesn't ever feel bored? She must not always make trouble! Does it mean that she 永不让生活风平浪静? Are we sure?

Now, probably the most interesting one, Russian:
Хотя, наверно, самые нежные и самые прочные в мире узы - те, что привязывают мужчину к загородному дому с непоседливыми детьми и женщиной, которая никогда не дает осесть даже пылинке.

Comment: What kind of a woman who doesn't even ever let dust be powder? A dilligent one, I would say.

xiaoyanchen wrote:

I think the winner is the only translator who got this phrase "never allows the dust to settle for too long" translated into correct meaning though the tone was stretched a bit too strongly. I don't know why this should be translated into something like cleaning the house to make it free from dust. This phrase is used metaphorically here, with its meaning almost the opposite to keeping the house dustfree. Hence it goes with the adjective "rowdy"(both are negative). Even you take it to mean literally, "never allowing the dust to settle" would mean "making it dusty" because if you never want the dust to settle, you have to stir up the dust. Again, I am saying this phrase is used metaphorically here and I think the winner's translation reflects the main theme of the author. If you check the original source article, you can see clearly where the author stands.



[Edited at 2008-04-19 07:23]


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xxxwonita
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最佩服的就是这样的人 Apr 19, 2008

lbone wrote:

http://www.proz.com/?sp=contests&sp_mode=current&sp_sub_mode=view_language&contest_id=13&ctlid=638

S/he seems to be a veteran, but is seldom on this forum.


不鸣则已,一鸣惊人!


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Wenjer Leuschel  Identity Verified
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Addendum to my doubt Apr 20, 2008

The first paragraph in my doubt should be as follows:
Wenjer Leuschel wrote:

The phrase "never allowing the dust to settle" could be an 一语相关. It could mean that the woman always looks for something exciting in family life and/or dilligently looks after the family. Both meanings are definitely NOT to be covered by 永不让生活风平浪静.


前头说过,我认为所有参赛者的翻译都有可取之处。事实上,每个人的翻译都有强处和弱点。对于得奖者的翻译,就像我的老同学说过的,这个世界上找不到任何大家都公认为好的翻译,意思是:总有个比较上最好的。

每个人的理解不同,表达风格不同,所以票选只是一种解决方法。我个人能接受的翻译相当广泛,所以发放翻译项目时,不见得寻找文字表达最优美的,也不见得寻找理解最彻底的,而是能向最终客户的使用目的交差,对得起“拿人钱财替人消灾”原则的。

我们这个行业容得下各种不同人才,再差的翻译文字用对地方,还是很可以卖钱的。对我而言,翻译竞赛是一种游戏,能看见的是参赛的翻译者在某些方面的表现如何,并不能完全评判翻译者在项目操作中可能会彰显的表现。

许久以来,我已养成不单独一人做翻译,而是和几位不同才能的翻译者进行某种标准的翻译流程。这样做,为的就是补足自己的盲点。成本虽然高些,业务招揽也比较困难,但比较保险。因为,没有任何参与工作的翻译者会过于自信,斩钉截铁说自己的理解和表达才是正确的。这样的程序做出来的文本,比较容易受到专业的肯定,达到文本使用的目的。

关于xiaoyanchen对我及其它翻译者所理解的never allow the dust to settle,他提出Even you take it to mean literally, "never allowing the dust to settle" would mean "making it dusty" because if you never want the dust to settle, you have to stir up the dust.的看法,我并不认为切中要害。所谓的"the main theme of the author",其实并非翻译界常听到的所谓的“见仁见智”;很清楚,从作者谈到“情色”暴露所带来的窘境,从众神聚集在阳台上看海伦偷情的后果(特洛伊战争),想想自己偷情的陈年往事将如何被人拿来枕边闲话,很自然转入比较保险的男女关系:家庭。这才是"the main theme of the author"。这世上还有比家中几个吵吵闹闹的孩童加上一个汲汲营营、不离不弃的“老婆”更保险的“情色”吗?

延伸来谈,《菜根谭》里说“饱后思味,则浓淡之境都消。色后思淫,则男女之见尽绝。故人常以事后之悔悟破临事之痴迷,则性定而动无不正。”This is in my humble opinion the main theme of the author. If xioyanchen could find another theme, I would be all to glad to learn.

翻译事业最忌讳的是坚持“以人取言、以言取人”或“以人废言、以言废人”,这四者都很容易使得翻译事业无成。再难听的话也要听得进去,再好听的话也不能受到迷惑。翻译者的目的是:卖钱!


[Edited at 2008-04-20 17:56]


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pkchan  Identity Verified
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翻譯境界 Apr 21, 2008

讀後想起﹕「時時勤拂拭,勿使惹塵埃。」 與「本來無一物,何處惹塵埃?」 兩個不同的境界。

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Wenjer Leuschel  Identity Verified
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红尘滚滚 Apr 21, 2008

本来无一物,后来什么都有了。惠能的意思是,尘埃飞扬落定,顺其自然,不惹也是本然。

有道是“不怕腥的人进厨房”,原文作者总结:有人“久入鱼市不知其臭”,甚至成为“海滨有逐臭之夫”,但“天下没有不吃腥的猫儿”,所以有人需要“捆绑在温柔的枷锁里,以便无觉于拘绊”。

滚滚红尘中,无需捆绑的人才会成为六祖那样的人。作者说的那两种人都还在尘埃里,没有境界的差别。

pkchan wrote:

讀後想起﹕「時時勤拂拭,勿使惹塵埃。」 與「本來無一物,何處惹塵埃?」 兩個不同的境界。


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Last Hermit
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仅供参考 Apr 21, 2008

  本文确实译得不错,但似乎有些暇疵。鄙人不揣冒味,试评述如下。纰缪之处,祈请诸位不吝赐教。

Eroticism has this in common with an addictive drug: that there is a coercive element to its pleasure with which part of us is in complicity, and part not. Thus ever since time began men have been trying to enjoy eroticism without being destroyed by it. Societies, religions can be defined in the way they deal with this conundrum. Polygamy, monogamy with repression, monogamy with affairs, monogamy with prostitutes, serial monogamy. Not to mention individual solutions of great ingenuity, or desperation: Victor Hugo with the door knocked through the wall of his office, to let in a girl each afternoon. Auden's flair for finding call-boys in every town. Picasso who simply refused when wife and mistress demanded he choose between them. Then there is always the hair-shirt of course. But perhaps the thing to remember when you wake up with a life full of fresh paint and tortuous complications is that eroticism wasn't invented for you, nor merely for the survival of the species perhaps, but for a divinity's entertainment. Nothing generates so many opportunities for titillation and schadenfreude as eroticism. Which is why it lies at the centre of so much narrative. How the gods thronged the balconies of heaven to see the consequences of Helen's betrayal! And your friends are watching too. Your antics have put the shine on many a late-night conversation.



情慾和毒品有個共通之處:它所帶來的愉悅讓我們欲拒還迎、欲罷不能不是所有,而是“part of us)。因此自古以來,人類这里应指“男人”。如果指“人类”用“man”足矣,此其一。其二,此文作者“Tim Parks”尚在生,生活在整天讲“political correctness”的西方世界,似乎不太可能不必要地出此“political incorrectness”。其三,该文上段刚讲完女人,这里自然讲的是男人。见:Eros)便企圖在享受情慾之間,不遭情慾所吞噬。可以從社會和宗教看待這個謎 的方式,來看出它們此代词指代不明)的趨向:一夫多妻或一妻多夫制、壓抑 型一夫一妻窃以为,这里不宜译作“制”,否则让人误会有些社会真有“压抑型一夫一妻制”这种制度,如下文的“召妓型一夫一妻制”就更让人误会以为这个一夫一妻制是允许召妓的,故宜译作“一夫一妻制下的压抑型”。)、外遇型一夫一妻制、召妓型一夫一妻制、多婚型一夫一妻制,更別提那些匠心獨具(或饑渴難耐)的解決之道:法國文豪雨果的工作室利用敲牆壁打 暗號这里的“with the door knocked through the wall of his office”应该不是敲墙壁打暗号这种小儿科,而是在墙上开洞装门,也许还是隐蔽的,所以才说“knocked through the wall ”。),每天下午讓一個女孩進門;英國詩人奧登則有辦法在所到 的每個城市中找到男妓;還有畢卡索斷然回絕老婆和情婦要他二擇一的要求。當然,世間也少不了那些禁慾的苦行者。但是當你發現你的生活中充滿了油漆未乾的警 示和錯綜複雜的糾葛時,也許你要記住的是情慾並不是為了你而 存在,也不僅是為了物種的存續,而是眾神的消遣娛樂。沒有一樣事物像情慾這樣,不是到處興風作浪这里似乎应为“欲仙欲死”),就是讓人幸災樂禍看好戲。這也是為什麼它是這麼多故事的 精華元素。惹得眾神群集在天臺上,就為了瞧瞧特洛伊的海倫背 叛愛人之後有什麼下場!而你的親朋好友也在觀眾之列,你搞的噱頭antics: foolish, outrageous, or amusing behaviour )則讓許多的深夜談話增色不少。

未完,待续……


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Wenjer Leuschel  Identity Verified
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Helloooo! Apr 21, 2008

Last Hermit,够久不见了!

你这一来分析这个文本,大伙儿有得学习了。精彩!有空请继续。


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xiaoyanchen
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My reply to Wenjer Apr 22, 2008

Wenjer, thank you for your comments. I just found there are quite a few comments on the translation here already. I am glad that people are starting to be interested in analyzing the translation rather than merely in knowing who is the winner. This is really good and I hope we can do this for the winning entry of each contest, including the previous ones so that each person who reads the discussion can benefit from others' analysis. I don't mean finding faults but mean serious academic discussion. Here is my reply:

My reason why "a woman who never allows the dust to settle" should be understood metaphorically is based on my interpretation of "Eros," which is a literary essay. Unlike technical manuals where straightforward and precision translation is preferred, when we translate a literary essay, we need to pay attention to various literary devices the author may have employed. If you read the whole essay (see below), you will see that throughout the essay there is a recurrent image of "dust," which starts from the first paragraph and comes full cycle in the last paragraph. In the first paragraph, Brahma "found the world dull and dusty" after he has finished his creation. Siva suggests death as living forever makes people bored. While sex fulfills the need for replenishing population, eroticism is said to "put a fine shine on the world...otherwise it might get dusty again." Please pay attention to the use of the word "shine" in juxtaposition with the word "dusty"(this juxtaposition again runs throughout the piece), and I think from here you can see how the metaphor is being developed.

In the second paragraph, the author goes on to describe sexual pleasure as having the power of refreshing and repainting life, making the world "so brightly enamelled," (See the word "brightly" as opposed to "dusty'"). However, the last sentence of the paragraph sets the humorous tone of the piece, which is quite important in understanding Tim Parks's essay, because as we read on, we find the author gives us a rather mortifying wake-up call that while humans derive refreshing pleasure from eroticism, the primary purpose of this was said to be providing entertainment for gods. "If marriage has a way of declining into dusty routine, myth-making likewise can lapse into tawdry chronicle." So poor Franco, who feels "suffocated" once he is "in the door," must chase forever "la jeune-fille très intelligente" in the "third marriage, the fourth" just to keep the show going on. In a rather detached yet amused tone, the author enumerates the ingenious ways Victor Hugo, Auden, and Picasso had each devised "to enjoy eroticism without being destroyed by it." Yet in the grander scheme of things, the ingenuity of these masters of artistic narrative and creation merely makes their "antics" more entertaining for gods in the "balconies of heaven." While eroticism refreshes your life like a magic paintbrush, it invariably brings you the inconvenience of fresh paint. Yet, wait, there is hope: Odysseus, as the author alludes to in the last paragraph, shows that there could be a way to enjoy eroticism without being destroyed. Unlike the other sailors who had to stuff their ears to avoid being lured by the singing of sirens, Odysseus got to enjoy the beautiful voices of the sirens without suffering the deadly consequence by tying himself to the mast. Now let's come to the controversial phrase in the last sentence of the essay: "But the kindest and toughest ropes of all are probably to be found in some suburban semi-detached with rowdy children and a woman who never allows the dust to settle for too long." The reason I have to go through the whole essay to come to explain this is that this phrase would be meaningless if it is separated and understood away from the rest of the essay. The phrase contains the underlying and unifying metaphor of "dust" which ties all paragraphs together. Then what does this "dust" mean? If you read the whole essay carefully and pay attention to the recurring image, you will see "dust" and "dusty" mean "boring" or "lack of excitement or freshness." Why does Franco want to abandon his family for the young girl? The key adjective he gives to the girl he is passionately in love with at the moment is interestingly not "beautiful" or "sexy" but "intelligent." It is amusing to read the author enquires "Intelligently pert breasts?" "Perceptively warm thighs?" because "intelligently" and "perceptively" are two adjectives rarely used together with "breasts" and "thighs." No wonder Franco is confused, but he is "deliriously proud" that his girl is intelligent. The interesting fact here is that he was no less passionate about his wife years ago and considered her "nothing if not intelligent." So where is the problem? Because the eroticism, "the bedrock the marriage rests" on, has obviously vanished for him as either he or his wife or both have allowed their marriage to "decline into dusty routine." If his wife can keep their passion burning and remain "la jeune-fille très intelligente" for him, there won't be need for him to seek passion elsewhere. That is why "a woman who never allows the dust to settle" is the woman who will never let her marriage fade into dust of boredom but will put a shine on their life by constantly renewing their passion for each other and keeping their relationship forever fresh. That would solidify the "bedrock" of their marriage and steer them away from the "quicksand." If you interpret the phrase literally to mean a woman who cleans the house all the time and takes care of her children, it would be hard to fit into the overall theme of the essay. Franco dreads going home and does not want more children. Personally I would never think such a woman would be able to keep her husband attached to her.

Of course, this is just my personal interpretation of the essay. And modern fiction is often capable of multiple interpretations, and I would definitely think so when we are dealing with an essay written by Tim Parks. In fact, with the adjective "rowdy" in the last sentence, there can be another way to interpret it as well. However, either way, I personally think the phrase should not be understood literally in this context. Otherwise the metaphor would be lost entirely, and together with it the entire fun of reading Tim's work.

BTW, there is a delayed of almost a whole day for my message to be posted, so if you do want to further discuss this, I may not be able to reply to you right away.

Thank you for your patience.

Eros
An essay by Tim Parks
If Brahma is a more endearing creator than Jehovah it is because he wasn't pleased with what he had made. He found the world dull and dusty. Death was the answer, suggested Siva. Living forever, people were bored. A time-limit would galvanize, give dignity. But in that case some way of replacing the population would have to be found. Brahma brought together a few trusted fellows and explained what was required. The pleasure took them by surprise. What was that for? To put a fresh shine on the world, they were told. Otherwise it might get dusty again...
I'm always taken aback when people talk about the eroticism of food and drink, of sunbathing and massage. This is mere sensuality. Or avoiding the issue. No experience even remotely compares with true eros, with long and lavish love-making. It is perfectly understandable that people should imagine its having been tacked on to creation afterwards, so extravagant is the pleasure it brings, so far beyond what is necessary. Never does the world seem so freshly painted, so brightly enamelled, so new, for heaven's sake, as after the best sex. But, alas, depending on where you're up to in life, it may be full of new complications too. A lesser authority than Brahma's would have issued a health-warning.
Over billiards and beer a friend is explaining why he is leaving his wife and two children. He's playing with unusual speed and precision. His eyes are brighter than the beer could account for. 'And the girl is twenty-three,' he explains. French. So intelligent. 'Intelligently pert breasts?' I enquire, 'Perceptively warm thighs?' He laughs. He is deliriously proud, confused, unhappy. 'I feel I was never really in love with my wife,' he says.
Eroticism paints out the past. In this sense it is the most potent myth-making and myth-destroying power we have. How those first encounters are told and re-told, cherished and savoured over and over again. How solid and irreplaceable they begin to seem. I did this, you said that. When your hand first... When your mouth... Beneath all the structure of domestic economy, in-laws, even children, it is on this bedrock that marriage rests. But only once? Is it never to happen again? Suddenly solid ground is quicksand...
'As soon as I'm in the door, I feel suffocated. I married too young.' Thus Franco, potting the black. 'I never experienced real passion.' Before la jeune-fille très intelligente, he means. And is setting up the table again. He is smoking too this evening. I have never seen him smoke before. 'I feel I will die if I go home,' he says. I ask him if he wants more children. He doesn't. 'Perhaps it's all a terrible mistake,' he says, 'but at least I will have had this passion.' Should I tell him that when we first met years ago he had seemed very passionate about his wife? Who is nothing if not intelligent...
Women. Another Indian myth - sexist, if you wish to be offended - has it that when the gods became scared of a man, scared of his developing spiritual powers, they would send him a woman. Or alternatively they might send Indra to seduce his wife and make him jealous. In either case, the turbulent feelings would disperse the power he had accumulated. So Franco, whose expertise once took him round all the capitals of Europe, now finds his life in pieces. Lawyers, quarrels, returns, departures. Then more women too. For if marriage has a way of declining into dusty routine, myth-making likewise can lapse into tawdry chronicle. The third marriage, the fourth. Meantime, my billiards is improving.
Eroticism has this in common with an addictive drug: that there is a coercive element to its pleasure with which part of us is in complicity, and part not. Thus ever since time began men have been trying to enjoy eroticism without being destroyed by it. Societies, religions can be defined in the way they deal with this conundrum. Polygamy, monogamy with repression, monogamy with affairs, monogamy with prostitutes, serial monogamy. Not to mention individual solutions of great ingenuity, or desperation: Victor Hugo with the door knocked through the wall of his office, to let in a girl each afternoon. Auden's flare for finding call-boys in every town. Picasso who simply refused when wife and mistress demanded he choose between them. Then there is always the hair-shirt of course. But perhaps the thing to remember when you wake up with a life full of fresh paint and tortuous complications is that eroticism wasn't invented for you, nor merely for the survival of the species perhaps, but for a divinity's entertainment. Nothing generates so many opportunities for titillation and schadenfreude as eroticism. Which is why it lies at the centre of so much narrative. How the gods thronged the balconies of heaven to see the consequences of Helen's betrayal! And your friends are watching too. Your antics have put the shine on many a late-night conversation.
On the borders between mythology and history, that wily survivor Odysseus was the first who learnt to trick the gods. And perhaps his smartest trick of all was that of lashing himself to the mast before the Sirens came in earshot. There are those of course who are happy to stand at the railings, even scan the horizon. Otherwise, choose your mast, find the ropes that suit you: sport, workaholism, celibacy with prayerbook and bell... But the kindest and toughest ropes of all are probably to be found in some suburban semi-detached with rowdy children and a woman who never allows the dust to settle for too long.


Wenjer Leuschel wrote:

This is in my humble opinion the main theme of the author. If xioyanchen could find another theme, I would be all to glad to learn.


[Edited at 2008-04-20 17:56]


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