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Thread poster: Guy Bray

Guy Bray  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:11
Member (2002)
French to English
Jan 20, 2005

I'm looking for answers from translators with practical experience of Termium. One, is it so much better than the GDT that the cost is justified; and Two, what are the pros and cons of the online versus the CD version?

Thanks


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Rosalind Lobo  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:11
French to English
prefer Termium Jan 20, 2005

Hi, Guy:
I've been freelancing for seven years - started with the CD version of Termium & went to the on-line version 1 1/2 years ago when I upgraded my computer. My vote is certainly for Termium vs. the Grand dictionnaire terminologique, although I use them both in tandem: Termium provides a sub-menu with a list of the entries that precede and follow the term I'm querying, so if it doesnt find my term, it provides me with approximate equivalents to check out. I also prefer Termium since it only requires entering the nouns of the term being checked - no prepositions or conjunctions - so there's a better chance of an approximate match. (I've also had instances of GDT's equivalents not being particularly accurate.)
When it comes to Termium on CD versus on-line, I'd recommend the on-line version since it's constantly being updated. Also, I myself find it more user-friendly.
As far as the cost, you can subscribe to Termium on line for as many months as you like. The one- or two-month costs are quite affordable & should give you an adequate trial period.
I should also mention that I work from French to English, so it's the F-E components of these databanks that I gravitate to.
Hope all this helps!
Roz


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Yolanda Broad  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:11
Member (2000)
French to English
+ ...

MODERATOR
I use the CD version of Termium Jan 20, 2005

And it gets a whole lot of use...

Actually, what I use is the CD copied onto my harddrive. I've tried the online version, and while I know that it has all those updates that the CD doesn't have, the speed with I can access the data is so much greater, even with my DSL connection, that there's no comparison. Also, unless things have changed with the online version, I like the CD format better.

I also have the GDT CD--but the 2001 version of that one, for some reason, won't copy onto my harddrive, unlike the older CD I got from them, so working with it is a whole lot slower--although not nearly as slow as going online. Finding that 2001 GDT CD on their Website wasn't easy, either. They clearly weren't very interested in marketing it. I have just checked and it is still being distributed here: http://cedrom-sni.com/ but I can't figure out any more how I managed to actually locate that CD on that site (it's not obvious!) I did just locate this URL, though:

http://www.publicationsduquebec.gouv.qc.ca/accueil.fr.html

Which gives me the following message:

Le grand dictionnaire terminologique 2001
Cédérom
ÉPUISÉ
Office de la langue française
2-551-20455-0

I guess this is why I can't locate anything on the sni site. Darn!


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NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 02:11
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

MODERATOR
Termium 2001 CD Jan 20, 2005

I misplaced it for a couple of weeks, and man, did I miss it.

I use the two together. Often one leads to the other and back again, as someone else has said in this thread. I find both indispensable.

I have a slow dial-up so I'll stick to the CD for now. GDT is a bit slow too (sometimes not even available) but my trusty Termium CD is my buddy.
How did you copy it onto your hard drive, Yolanda? I'd do the same, if it meant faster searches. (I always use 'all terms' rather than just one language direction, because I go both ways all day - hihi - I'm not trying to be funny)

Nancy


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xxx00000000
English to French
+ ...
Different Jan 20, 2005

I've been subscribing to Termium for years and I'll continue to do so.

If I had to do with just one of them, I would keep Termium. I appreciate the GDT but dislike its prescriptive attitude. Termium is more descriptive of what's actually being used throughout Canada.

With the GDT, I'm more and more under the impression that they want to cater to the needs of Europeans (some words they give are simply never used in Québec/Canada but are common in Europe).

Best,
Esther


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lien
Netherlands
Local time: 08:11
English to French
+ ...
Essai Jan 20, 2005

Guy Bray wrote:

I'm looking for answers from translators with practical experience of Termium. One, is it so much better than the GDT that the cost is justified; and Two, what are the pros and cons of the online versus the CD version?

Thanks


Ils ne proposent plus un abonnement à l'essai de 8 jours sur Termium ?

Termium c'est énorme, on y trouve de tout sur tout avec beaucoup d'explications très détaillées. C'est très technique. Je ne l'utilise pas, il n'a pas le genre de mots que je cherche, mais j'en avais fait l'essai.


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Yolanda Broad  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:11
Member (2000)
French to English
+ ...

MODERATOR
How to get Termium on your harddrive Jan 20, 2005

When I purchased my first Termium CD, there was a box I could check requesting permission to copy it onto the CD. I checked that, got the permission, then (unfortunately) had to get a Termium technician to help me get it installed once copied (the .exe file I needed to use turned out to be in a subdirectory). The second CD didn't have that problem, but I had to make sure I got the password for opening it, once installed. Now that it's installed, I don't need to use that password anymore. Note: I installed my Termium on my external harddrive, rather than the computer itself, so it would be portable between computers. I'd be lost if I didn't have my electronic references when I'm out of town! Once upon a time I had to haul a whole box of dicos around everytime I went on "vacation." No more!

NancyLynn wrote:

How did you copy it onto your hard drive, Yolanda? I'd do the same, if it meant faster searches. (I always use 'all terms' rather than just one language direction, because I go both ways all day - hihi - I'm not trying to be funny)

Nancy


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Guy Bray  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:11
Member (2002)
French to English
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Jan 21, 2005

Many thanks to all the people who responded. I'm going to subscribe to the online version.

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Thierry LOTTE  Identity Verified
Local time: 08:11
Member (2001)
English to French
+ ...
Okee Dokee... Jan 21, 2005

Okey Dokey !
Very interesting information !.

Just wondering why it goes in english when this forum is dedicated to french language...

Termium is the "well known" dic. for the french canadians compelled to use french language under any circumstances (Loi 101 - As far as I know...).


Now, why does it run on this forum ?

Well ! No swell ! But I woud like that the "rules" might be followed whoever...


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