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Copying files from one drive to another in Windows XP
Thread poster: casey

casey
United States
Local time: 12:32
Member
Japanese to English
Jul 2, 2007

I have Windows XP. The problem is that the genius that set it up gave me more space on drive D than I have on drive C. Since e-mail is stored by default on drive C I am running out of space. I moved my work folder from drive C to drive D, but now when I copy my files from the desktop to my work folder a copy of the file gets left on the desktop. I just want to move the files; I don't want to create a copy of them. Is there some way to prevent it from doing this? I suppose I could move the e-mail storage to drive D and that might help for a little while...

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Can Altinbay  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:32
Japanese to English
+ ...
Move rather than copy Jul 2, 2007

If I understand correctly, you want to move the files. The files as a result will be on drive D and no longer on drive C.

Windows copy actually moves files between directories, but copies them between drives. You can cut and paste using those menu options, or press the Shift key before dragging the files from one location to the other.

Now if you need e-mail to be deposited in the D drive instead of the C drive, you'll need to set up some parameters, and I won't investigate that for right now (sorry), but the above answers your immediate question as I understood it.


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casey
United States
Local time: 12:32
Member
Japanese to English
TOPIC STARTER
Shift + drag works perfectly!! Jul 2, 2007

Thank you!!

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xxxtlmurray
Local time: 12:32
English
More D than C usually a good thing Jul 2, 2007

The problem is that the genius that set it up gave me more space on drive D than I have on drive C.


For most users, more D and C is the way to do -- applications tend to grow at a far slower rate than data, and it's the data that's most important. Further, to keep many gigs of e-mails is usually overkill.

And about moving between volumes: besides what Can said, you can right-click and drag, and you're given an option to copy or move.


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casey
United States
Local time: 12:32
Member
Japanese to English
TOPIC STARTER
I didn't think about that Jul 3, 2007

tlmurray wrote:

For most users, more D and C is the way to do -- applications tend to grow at a far slower rate than data, and it's the data that's most important. Further, to keep many gigs of e-mails is usually overkill.

And about moving between volumes: besides what Can said, you can right-click and drag, and you're given an option to copy or move.


I see your point, but My Documents, My Music and all those other locations are on C. The only way you could store your data on D is if you intentionally selected it when installing new software (which I do). I have 5 G on C and 250 on D. It just doesn't seem logical.


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Owen Davies
Japan
Local time: 02:32
Member (2007)
Japanese to English
+ ...
Wipe it clean! Jul 3, 2007

Hi Casey,
Yeah, 5GB on C seems a little on the stingy side! tlmurray's right about how your programs/data should be set up by you might find yourself running out of space to install programs...Acrobat alone takes up a greedy 750MB. How about transferring all of your data to an external HD - you can get 250GB drives for around 1万 these days (Lacie are good). Then reinstall Windows. A bit drastic, granted! But might save you some hastle down the road.
All the best,
Owen


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Henrik Pipoyan  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:32
Member (2004)
English to Armenian
Hi Casey Jul 3, 2007

You can move My Documents and Outlook Express store folder to any drive you want. I always keep them on D drive, because it's safer. If something happens to my programs and I reinstall the system, I won't lose my data.

There are a number of ways to move My Documents to Drive D. I think the easiest way is to create a My Documents folder on D, right-click on the My Documents icon on your desktop, open the Properties and change the path to D:\My Documents. Windows will automatically accept this path as the path to your documents and it will work in any program.

For Outlook Express, go to Tools > Options > Maintenance, press the "Store Folder" button, and then the "Change" button. There you can specify a folder on any drive, including D, where you want you messages to be stored. You can just create a Mailbox folder in My Documents, and instruct Outlook Express to store all your messages, including the ones you have already received, in this folder. Follow the online instructions carefully not to lose your data when moving them.

Make sure to backup your files before doing this, in case you lose your data.


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