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Many programs - need for bigger processor?
Thread poster: Robin Salmon
Robin Salmon  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 22:34
German to English
+ ...
Sep 5, 2007

I use a 3.21GB Intel Pentium computer and I have just counted the total of the programs I have installed. That comes to 3.68 MB. I have about 70% of space left and 1.5GB of RAM.

My computer has overheated because it is a very dusty here by the sea and it looks as if the capacitors are kaputt and I will have to get a new processor.

Can anyone recommend the size of processor I need for the amount of programs I am running (I intend to install more because I am going to buy more dictionaries soon)?

The main heavy program is Dragon at 1.36 GB but it is essential.

Any advice much appreciated.

Robin


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:34
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Depends really on the programs you run Sep 5, 2007

But just for Dragon any Intel or AMD from nowadays will do, even a Celeron or something like that.
However, if your motherboard is suitable, go for Intel Core Duo 6650 or 6750 - now the best performance to cost ratio.

Jerzy


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PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 14:34
English to Polish
+ ...
Gigabytes and megabytes... Sep 5, 2007

I think you are confusing processor speed, amount of RAM and space on your hard drive. Or maybe not...

Processor speed is not as important as the amount of RAM if you are running many programs at once.

I would say 2 GB of RAM is a safe amount these days. There is never such a thing as too much RAM - buy the most you can afford, or the most that fits on your motherboard.

My computer at work has 2 GB RAM and a dual core 2.13 GHz Intel processor and I am very happy with it.
My computer at home has a 1.5 GHz AMD processor and 1 GB RAM. I am less happy with it... Going to replace the motherboard and processor soon.

HTH
Pawel Skalinski

p.s. processor speed matters for operations like e.g. file indexing - my Copernic DTS at work indexes files in ca. 15 minutes.
At home, it takes about 45 minutes (the number of files to index is similar).

[Edited at 2007-09-05 08:45]


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ozan karakış
Turkey
Local time: 15:34
English to Turkish
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before replacing the CPU Sep 5, 2007

try to blow some very high PSI air into the heatsink and the CPU fan.

I've done this to many many computers and the results are quite good. What to do is: take off the CPU kit (Fan, heatsink) off the CPU slot, and blow high PSI air into them.

Once, I found a layer of dusty muddy stuff between the heatsink and the fan. That layer was unblowable by the air so I cleaned it by hand once I unscrewed the fan from the heatsink.

I would do the cleaning first. Where to find high PSI air? Just go to the nearest petrol station or buy a canister from any computer shop. If you decide to go to the petrol station, I would take the entire case with me and blow air into it, too.

This is my best and cheapest solution.


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John Di Rico  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 14:34
Member (2006)
French to English
Vacuum Sep 5, 2007

About every 2 or 3 months I open up my computer and vacuum out cat hairs and dust. I haven't gone as far as unscrewing things and blowing PSI air through them but I'd like to try (I've noticed my computer getting progressively louder over the past two years). Now, if I could only figure out what a heat sink is and not destroy my computer as I start MacGyvering away at it...

John


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ozan karakış
Turkey
Local time: 15:34
English to Turkish
+ ...
HEAT SINK Sep 5, 2007

when you open up the case, you see the CPU which is located on the motherboard and has a fan on it. This is the only unit on the motherboard with a fan. This fan has a radiator under it which is cooled by air via the fan. This radiator is called the heatsink.

The radiator and the heatsink are attached together with little screws which makes the two one unit. This unit can be taken away from the CPU by simply unloking a metal arm that is holding the unit on CPU. Very easy to locate and unlock. Once you do that, the next step is plug off the electric cable of the fan from the motherboard. Believe me, very simple once you get the case naked (the side walls off) and once you can see the motherboard.

If you see dusty muddy stuff between the fan and the heatsink, just unscrew the screws and torture the two with air.


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John Di Rico  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 14:34
Member (2006)
French to English
Thanks! Sep 5, 2007

Thanks for the instructions Ozan!

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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:34
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
When removing the heatsink from processor... Sep 5, 2007

which with modern motherboards will not necessarily be the only one with fan on the board, but certainly the one with the biggest cooler and fan, do not forget, that when replacing the heatsink on the processor you must use a special thermal conducting paste to avoid processor damage. This is extremly important for all newer processors, because they produce quite significant amount of heat.

Best
Jerzy


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 15:34
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
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Rather a smaller processor Sep 5, 2007

...as each processor generation is smaller than the predecessor. Though of course they put all kind of other stuff along with the processor.
I'm quite happy with 512 Mb Ram and XP, but I don't use Dragon. Usually I have 7-9 programs open.
Cheers
Heinrich


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Robin Salmon  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 22:34
German to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for responses Sep 5, 2007

I am grateful for all your answers.

Last Friday the tec came round and took the heat sink out of the computer, burning his little fingies in the process. He then put it on the lawn and after that put it beside a fan and got all the dust off it.

The computer has been crashing merrily since. Last night, however, I found that the new microphone I had bought for Dragon was not giving me good results and so I reinstalled my old one, lashing it up with Sellotape. The computer has only crashed once since, which is marvellous. So it looks as if I had two months of stress just because the driver for the new mike I bought was not fitting in with its neighbours.

Something I was told by the tec also is that you should keep the front of the computer case uncovered at the bottom as that is where the air is sucked in from. I even had a fan in front of it (as he suggested for the summer months here, which are on their way) but it has still been crashing.

Anyway, it is possible that I'm rejoicing prematurely but I'll keep you posted.


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Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 15:34
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
That reminds me Sep 6, 2007

Two years ago a thought I had enough of the noise my desktop machine made, so I took it to the repair shop. The next day they called and told me, that they are going to install a bigger fan, but for that they have to install also a bigger power unit. I gave green light. But after all this the noise was the same as before.
The next time the machine went to repair was when I had a virus infection. After a day of "desinfection" at the shop the viruses were still in.
Rather buy a new machine.
Cheers
Heinrich


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Robin Salmon  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 22:34
German to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for instructions Sep 6, 2007

[torture the two with air.

[/quote]

Turkey's still heading for EU membership, is it, Ozan? Just kidding!

Thanks for explaining that as I only got as far as flipping back the clips on the fan and got stuck, when I tried yesterday. I'll try again some time following your instructions and those of others.


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PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 14:34
English to Polish
+ ...
keeping cool Sep 6, 2007

If you open the computer case, the fan noise will be even louder without the case to absorb some of it and it will be much easier for the dust to get in, even though the air circulation will be better.

Look around for a good (and quiet) case fan and a good processor fan. They will do a good job of keeping the computer cool without sounding like an airplane taking off.
I paid around 30 euro for a Zalman CPU fan. The heat sink is made of copper and the whole fan weighs 800 grams (!)

Like John, I clean the guts of my desktop using a regular vacuum cleaner once every few months. It doesn't have to be sterile-clean - just get rid of the dust balls which clog the openings and which settle on the various components inside.

P.A.S.

[Edited at 2007-09-06 09:43]


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N.M. Eklund  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 14:34
Member (2005)
French to English
+ ...
Cool, quiet computer Sep 6, 2007

I once talked about this with a whole hoard of techies when visiting a client.
I live in an apartment just under a metal roof. So, despite the standard insulation, it can still get pretty darn hot.

After recommending larger computer fans, their main advice:
insulate the computer case.
Any insulation will do, it cuts down on sound but also keeps the computer from overheating.

I replied I was still doubtful, because that would just keep the computer heat inside to accumulate....they replied, that's what the fan's for.
Go figure.


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Jerzy Czopik  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:34
Member (2003)
Polish to German
+ ...
Quiet computer Sep 6, 2007

Shouldn't be a problem, thogh.
Thre are a lot of power supplies without any fan, so they are noiseless.
Then you can buy a passive cooled graphics card (without fan too, noiseless).
There are also heatsinks for processor without a fan - also noiseless.
This would be nearly all - hard disks remain, and those can be fairly noisy.

To have an absolut quiet PC, you would need a server, situated somwhere, where you don't hear it, and a smart workstation without a HDD
Should be possible, but I think expensive.

When buying a PC pay attention, that it is equipped with low-noise components. This makes a big difference.

Jerzy


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