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Moving from Argentina to the US
Thread poster: gdangelo
gdangelo
English to Spanish
Feb 1, 2002

I need all the help I can get in terms of suggestions, comments, hints, advice.

I have been a professional translator (English/Spanish) for over 15 years and I am also a literature student (UBA). I specialize in film scripts, and also business, banking, medicine (fertility), tourism (travel books), and journalism.

Thanks to you all!!!


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Henry Dotterer
Local time: 04:52
SITE FOUNDER
Bring alfajores Feb 1, 2002

We love them up here. And if you wind up in the SF area, look us up.

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Elinor Thomas  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:52
English to Spanish
+ ...
hahahaaaaaaa Feb 1, 2002

Henry, don\'t forget to ask also for yerba for your mate!!



Gdangelo, te deseo lo mejor. Nosotros aun nos quedamos, no por falta de ganas de irnos, aunque también cuesta dejar este sufrido terruño.



Acordate, por las dudas de llevarte una cacerola para allá.



Este es solo un mensaje para darte ánimo, eh, no me lo tomes a mal.



Un saludo grande!



Elinor


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Clarisa Moraña  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 05:52
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
If you are going to see Henry, bring him some pizza Feb 1, 2002

But it must be from \"Los Inmortales\": capresa, calabresa & pizzaiola...





I\'m sorry that I\'ve no other suggestion for you, but once you get there, please tell me and I might follow you.



Regards!

Clarisa


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Andrea Bullrich  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:52
Member
English to Spanish
Refugee forum? :-) Feb 1, 2002

I\'m just kidding, of course, I don\'t mean to be rude. Just a thought, though: have you tried the American Embassy in BA? (Be ready to stand in line...)



Andrea


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gdangelo
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
tks for the humour Feb 1, 2002

I do need it!!!

As regards the US Embassy... well, I have all my papers ready and other than that... they do offer much help.

I want to continue freelancing in the US but how shall I start?



Quote:


On 2002-02-01 17:36, AIM wrote:

I\'m just kidding, of course, I don\'t mean to be rude. Just a thought, though: have you tried the American Embassy in BA? (Be ready to stand in line...)



Andrea



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Bertha S. Deffenbaugh  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:52
English to Spanish
+ ...
Hi gdangelo Feb 1, 2002

Are you coming to the USA on a scholarship or on a working visa?

What is it you would like to know?



Regards,



BSD


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Elinor Thomas  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:52
English to Spanish
+ ...
Forgot to tell you Feb 2, 2002

Together with the pizza, bring Henry a good bottle of Moscato.



That\'s the tradition in Los Inmortales and he enjoyed it. hehe.



Cheers!!



Elinor


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Henry Dotterer
Local time: 04:52
SITE FOUNDER
some advice Feb 2, 2002

I will address only the business aspect of your question.



First off, I assume you have some client relationships worth keeping. Make sure to do so, by informing your clients of any part of your plan that will affect them. Given what I hear about the currency situation, you might want to provide a way for your clients to continue to pay you or a proxy in Argentina. If they do require a local, be sure to introduce one of your colleagues.



Next, focus your attention on developing new business in the US and elsewhere. Set your pricing-to-service ratio at a level that will help you win clients, allow you to keep them for a long time, and still maintain the standard of living that you seek.



Experiment with as many channels of client acquisition as possible. These include online marketplaces (and workplaces, like ProZ.com), offline associations (ATA and its local chapters in the US), interpreters organizations, industry associations in your area of specialization (law, medicine, whatever). Have your own website. Get listed in the phone book. Attend language industry events. Write articles and speak. Publish a glossary in your field. Make a discussion group, form a team.



If you are already a freelancer, you know that you will have to work hard to develop a steady flow of new business. If your schedule is not filled by your projects, devote some of the extra time to improving your skills (read a book on localization, master a tool, take a course, earn some kudoz points).



Also, savor the extra time as a chance to enjoy life and explore your new home.



One final bit of advice: Live in a place where the people are friendly the land beautiful; these places are always more affordable.



I\'ll let others offer general advice on a move to the States. Welcome.


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Patricia Lutteral  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 05:52
English to Spanish
+ ...
This is how it feels Feb 2, 2002

Thanks, Henry, for your advice.



Good tips and common sense are highly appreciated by those of us who have to leave.



I\'ve just read this BBC article and I want to share it with you all. It\'s written by an Argentine colleague and I think it accurately conveys the way most Argentines feel now.



http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/business/newsid_1761000/1761303.stm



Regards,



Patricia


[addsig]


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gdangelo
English to Spanish
TOPIC STARTER
Feb 2, 2002

Bertha:

I have a working visa.



Henry: tks for the advise. I am considering exactly that: friendly people and beautiful land. I also have a former host family (I was an exchange student) in the Ithaca area so...



Patricia: irse es una decisión difícil. Todavía no pude leer el artículo porque estoy trabajando en una COTIZACION.



HENRY: No quiero romper ninguna regla así que te consulto: puedo hablar con Patricia y Elinor respecto de una cotización en este foro o lo tengo que hacer a traves de la sección general de trabajos?

So far I owe you ALFAJORES (any brand in particular?), PIZZA (Los Inmortales), and MOSCATO (cold as served in El Sanjuanino after a hot meal). Anything else, guys?!









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Eleftherios Kritikakis  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 03:52
Member (2003)
Greek to English
+ ...
Guideline... Feb 3, 2002

In order to move (succesfully) from one country to another (and from one culture to a totally different one), you have to move because you like the other culture more than the first one, and you are willing to sucrifice a few years for necessary adjustments. Leaving just because of economic difficulties will lead you to realize more difficulties in the U.S. (if not financial, of other nature for sure). If you\' ve already decided to move, at least try to avoid expensive areas (California or New York, for example). Not many new translators can afford living in those areas (you can\'t even rent an apartment in the US unless you have a credit history here).

You will face new competitors who are already established, so you will need to live in low cost-of-living areas (and use a local sponsor who can co-sign with you until you establish some credit history), and until you have a steady clientele. You have to seriously consider that it will take years to even develop a few reliant friendships, and you will have to enter groups and associations with very old and active members. It\'s a new world you\' re entering into. Be well prepared, the U.S. culture and business landscape is way different than in Argentina.



Wish you good luck.



Regards



Lefteris


[addsig]


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Cynthia Brals-Rud  Identity Verified
Local time: 10:52
English to Spanish
+ ...
You will be fine! Feb 4, 2002

Because we are a very determined people! If my experience helps one bit, let me tell you, you will be just fine.



Sure, it\'s sometimes hard, you miss people, places and things (and food! Havanas, Havanas...), but you also gain a new perspective and insight. It\'s a big step, one I am sure you have carefully considered: You will be fine.



Some practical advice:



- Request your original Birth Certificate (Partida de nacimiento). Make copies, have them validated and legalized (they count as originals). Put your original birth certificate in a safe-box. Have the copies translated (The US Embassy can give you a list of translators with authorized signature).



- Also, have your diploma/s translated and legalized.



- Take a couple of passport photos with you.



This may sound silly, but you won\'t have to worry about paperwork later because you will be prepared.



Also, make sure you get out! Because our free-lancing world is sometimes restricted to our quarters!, and we don\'t know our way around, we are scared and feel isolated: make sure you relate to people beyond your computer screen, dare to walk around, face every situation one step at a time.



Although I first moved to Belgium and later on to the Netherlands, I think the inner process is pretty much the same. If you want to exchange ideas and voice your fears , e-mail me (mcbrals@cs.com). Yes, I cried all the way to Paris (sounds chic, but it wasn\'t! the poor flight attendant came to me with a rose... I still have the dried petals). But, today, a decade later, I have friends all over the world, I am happily married (to a Dutchman), I\'ve learnt two new languages, got extra diplomas, run my own business, gained precious experience in all aspects of life and I still am argentina to the bone!



So, take a deep breath and move forward! You will be fine!







Cynthia


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Bertha S. Deffenbaugh  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:52
English to Spanish
+ ...
Dear gdangelo Feb 6, 2002

I could give you a hundred tips, but I will only say a few things.



I came to the USA exclusively because I married an american. As you can see things should have been pretty easy for me. But they haven\'t. Never mind the reason why you emmigrate, it is never easy. Never mind how happy you may feel about emmigrating, it always hurts.



I could give you an endless list of the many things I like about this country and about its people [ gentle, kind, educated, respectful .....AND smiling ... !!!] However , I insist, it is never easy to leave behind so much.



Take with you as many pictures of your loved ones and pictures of your favourite city and places. When you arrive in the USA, frame as many pictures as possible and set them on your desk.

Get ready to be a good and respectful driver. USA drivers obey the traffic regulations and traffic is way different from the mess we are used to in Uruguay and Argentina.

Last but not least, if you need dental treatment, go to a dentist in Argentina. Dentists are terribly expensive here in the USA. What costs 300 in Uruguay costs 900 in the USA. [ Cars are cheap, but dentists are quite a different story]



Make sure that you can go back to Argentina in case you changed your mind.



What else? There is so much to say... If you would like to get some specific questions answered, go ahead.



Best of luck,



BSD


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xxxElena Sgarbo  Identity Verified
Italian to English
+ ...
From an Argentine immigrant in the US Feb 7, 2002

Dear GDangelo,

I agree with Bertha in terms of the hurt of being away from loved ones, familiar customs and places. I also agree in that driving a car is way easier here in the States than in both Argentine and Italian cities (I\'ve lived in Italy too...)!! Driving can be a breeze in many areas. Good maintenance of the roads helps, too.



One economy-related piece of advice: if you\'re not yet enrolled in a frequent-flyer program with an airline, do so before your first trip to the US. You may be doing more traveling than anticipated, both within the US and to Argentina (and why not, to other places ). Accumulating miles is the way my husband and I (and our 6 y/o son, who is a FF himself) can get almost-free airplane tickets (round-trip) to BA & fly family and friends over, every year. For a plane ticket to Argentina you need 50,000 miles, or about 5 R-T trips.



To the list of expensive US places to live in already mentioned in the Forum, I\'d like to add mine: Chicago and its hip suburbs. Of course in Chicago you also get a lot of what a big city has to offer in its downtown area... if you\'re willing to pay over 1,500$ per month for an appt rent, 18-19$ per hour for parking in a parking lot, or at least 40$-50$ a head for a meal at a restaurant (no wine, tips at 15% of your bill).



After 12 years of living in the MidWest (first in Cleveland), I must say I was unprepared for the looong winters. By looking at the globe map, I thought that just because Cleveland (or Chicago, for that matter) were at the same latitude as Bologna & Padua, Italy, the climate would be similar. Wrong. Winters are much colder and longer here. I guess the lack of an Alpine mountain chain to stop Artic winds & the presence of the beautiful Great Lakes explain why. If you\'re targeting these latitudes, know that while central heating is great in most places (including housing for rent) you\'ll do a lot less casual street walking than you may be doing now. Thus you do need to plan on some form of regular exercise for the winter (Cardiologist advice, here). Walking at the mall is popular among seniors, and it makes sense.



Additional suggestions:

- find out what the tacit customs and codes may be operative in your area. This may prove difficult, but no impossible. You can get cues by attending seminars dictated by community colleges, or participating in some community or association activities. Watch TV: some sitcoms are as instructive as the news. If you go to Seattle (or if you enjoy elegant humor and uncommon words, Les Luthiers\' style), by all means watch \"Frasier\" in NBC.

- introduce yourself to everyone you meet (first and last name) and learn quickly the name of the other person. Smile widely. This is way more important here than in Argentina.

- when greeting people, shake hands with both men and women, or greet from distance if the situation is more casual. As a gral. rule, don\'t kiss women when meeting them. (you probably already know this from movies... don\'t you?)



Last thing (of many more I may be saying, but let\'s let other people chime in with their own views here): Americans are trusting people, and usually trustworthy/ ethical. My husband and I believe that these 2 traits make the US work successfully in some many areas. It is a pleasure to work / do business with many people here. It is also more difficult to make friends, because the anglo-saxon culture is quite different from the Latin one, but it\'s not impossible. The few good American friends we have are terrific. We also have several Latin friends: with them you can always share binding experiences.



Mucha suerte!

Elena





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