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What does "in-house" mean?
Thread poster: Ana Gómez
Ana Gómez
Local time: 19:12
Catalan to Spanish
+ ...
Aug 5, 2004

Hello,
I hope you can help me: what does "in-house job" mean? Does it mean you work at your own home, or that you have to work somewhere else? A company, an office, etc.?


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Elvira Stoianov  Identity Verified
Luxembourg
Local time: 19:12
German to Romanian
+ ...
it means you will be hired as an employee Aug 6, 2004

and will be working in the company as staff

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Narasimhan Raghavan  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:42
English to Tamil
+ ...
There is another word for working from your place Aug 6, 2004

If you are a freelance translator, you can call yourself "at-home translator". "In-house" means inside the office and it is from the employer's viewpoint whereas the former term is from that of the freelancer.

I remember my 3rd form teacher Mr.Jayarama Iyengar, who took a lot of pains to teach us English grammar. He taught us to write "I am going home" and told us one should not say: "I am going to my house." I can of course go to my friend's house. In that way home is something your own whereas house is something more foreign. Hence I had no difficulty in following my French professor, when he taught us to write:"Je me lave les mains" (la possession est evidente).

Regards,
N.Raghavan

[Edited at 2004-08-06 08:13]


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Textklick  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:12
German to English
+ ...
Variations on a theme Aug 6, 2004

Being an in-house translator generally means that you work for a translation company as an employee. Usually this involves working at their premises, but some allow telecommuting.

Also, some translation companies will ask you whether you are prepared to work "in-house" as a freelancer, which means working on their premises for a specific project(s).


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PAS  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:12
English to Polish
+ ...
A house is not a home Aug 6, 2004

Textklick wrote:
o, some translation companies will ask you whether you are prepared to work \"in-house\" as a freelancer, which means working on their premises for a specific project(s).[/quote]

For me, this is the best type of job. You go to work to an office, so you don\'t have the problem of convincing yourself to work that day and at the same time you are independent, not part of the office rat race (well, to a certain extent, anyway).

Pawel Skalinski


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Harry Bornemann  Identity Verified
Mexico
English to German
+ ...
It does *not* mean you will be hired as an employee. Aug 6, 2004

Elvira Stoianov wrote:
it means you will be hired as an employee
and will be working in the company as staff


You'll have to work at the clients office because of technical reasons (economy), but it does not say anything about whether you will continue as a freelancer or an employee. This is usually expressively stated in the contract you will have to sign.


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Ana Gómez
Local time: 19:12
Catalan to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you Aug 6, 2004

Thanks for all your replies.

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Stefan Keller  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 19:12
English to German
But it should! Aug 6, 2004

Harry_B wrote:

You'll have to work at the clients office because of technical reasons (economy), but it does not say anything about whether you will continue as a freelancer or an employee. This is usually expressively stated in the contract you will have to sign.


Don't confuse "in-house" and "on-site". I would consider *in-house* being permanent staff, unless stated otherwise.


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Harry Bornemann  Identity Verified
Mexico
English to German
+ ...
"in-house" and "on-site". Aug 6, 2004

Stefan Keller wrote:
...Don't confuse "in-house" and "on-site". I would consider *in-house* being permanent staff, unless stated otherwise.


People working "in-house" are mostly employees, but not necessarily. I think the difference between "on-site" and "in-house" is that "on-site" may point to a third party (the office of the end client).

But I agree that "employee" and "in-house" are often mixed up, particularly by CEOs trying to inflate their image

That's why your exact status - your rights, benefits and duties - are usually explained very comprehensively in the respective contracts.


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Orla Ryan  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 18:12
in-house job requirement Aug 6, 2004

Usually, if you are employed in-house, it is often a requirement of your employment conditions that you do not translate for anyone else as a freelancer. In-house means you work exclusively for the company as a regular employee.

Orla


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