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MA/DipTrans/Other
Thread poster: grinlord
grinlord
Local time: 08:33
English to Spanish
+ ...
Aug 31, 2004

Hello everybody,

I wonder if you can guide me.
I have a University Diploma, a BSc (Hons) and amateur experience translating and interpreting in the medical field, and now I am really interested in commencing a career in non-literary translation and becoming a professional translator. So, I am thinking in undertaking an MA in Applied Tranlation. I've checked the one ofered by the London Metropolitan University which is designed specifically for commencing (or advancing) a career in non-litarary translation and it looks very good to me.
However I have a few queries about it and I would like to know what you, guys, think:
- not having any formal studies/qualifications in translation would be appropiate to undertake this course?
- will it be recognized in the translator industry? So to speak, assuming that I obtain a MA qualification, is that enough to start applying for jobs?
- should I get the Dip Trans (IoL) as well?

Any advice will be very welcome.
Thank you very much in advance.


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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:33
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
A great part of us are self-employed Aug 31, 2004

so I'm not too sure what you mean by "jobs" (an outsourced job or in-house job?)


- not having any formal studies/qualifications in translation would be appropiate to undertake this course?


The university would be in the best position to decide that. Do you meet the admission requirements? If so, it would likely be appropriate. They would suit such requirements to the projected course content.


- will it be recognized in the translator industry? So to speak, assuming that I obtain a MA qualification, is that enough to start applying for jobs?


Certainly. Successful translators have started and gone on with less. Once again, your fulfilment (or lack of it) of the admission requirements would be an index of what you may expect, and what you may have to brush up on.


- should I get the Dip Trans (IoL) as well?


That wouldn't do any harm. But once again, assess where you are, and when it would be timely for you to do it, granted you're going to do it.

Hope it helps. Others may have more specific advice.


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xxxLia Fail  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:33
Spanish to English
+ ...
for what it's worth... Sep 3, 2004

I have done a Master's and the IOL, the IOL first.

If you haven't a lot of experience, it's hard to get started, but if you have a translation qualification, it will certainly be less difficult.

The IOL can be studied from home, and the exam takes just one day, so it's actually the easiest to organise, as you can carry on working. It's also a very worthwhile and eminenely practical qualification: it proves you can decode one language and encode in another.

Doing a Master's doesn't prove you can function at the practical level, as in my own experience, practical translation was only a relatively small part of the course (about a third). So you could actually obtain your degree without being actually very good at translating, although you might be good at other things (Theory, MT, etc).

HTH:-)


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Sophie Theophile  Identity Verified
New Zealand
Local time: 19:33
English to French
Comments from an ex London Metropolitan University student... Sep 7, 2004

I did the MA in Applied Translation Studies two years ago and have since become a member of the IOL. I had experience as a freelancer before applying for the course, but I thought an MA course would widen my job prospects.
The London Metropolitan University course is very practical: in addition to the theoretical aspects of translation, you get introduced to the main translators' tools, as well lots of opportunities to put your translating skills into practice, and you receive lots of sound advice from the qualified staff. What made me choose this course in particular was the opportunity to do a work placement, which I think is a great advantage. I did mine with a small translation agency in London; it was a very good experience: it gave me good insights of the translation industry from the other side of the business, and I gained a useful contact as I am now working for this agency as a freelancer.
Regarding job prospects, I cannot really tell whether the MA has helped me getting a lot more work but it has certainly given me more confidence in my abilities and I have definitely made useful contacts thanks to the course. If you find it difficult to get work at the moment, I guess doing a course can only be beneficial. Working as a freelance translator can be a very lonely job, so if you do decide to go for it, I would also advise you strongly to stay in touch with your fellow students.

I hope this helps a bit.

I wish you all the best and if you need any more information, do not hesitate to contact me.

Sophie


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