Career AdviceCould anyone give me some advice regarding translation qualifications?
Thread poster: Esther Cocks
Esther Cocks  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:09
German to English
Jun 6, 2005

Career Advice

Could anyone give me some advice regarding translation qualifications?

My name is Esther Cocks, I am 29 years old, British and have been living in Munich, Germany for almost 10 years. I studied Equestrianism when I was 16 years old and have successfully worked for 3 Olypmic Team riders.
Three years ago I decided that although I love the sport, it isn't a career that you would find yourself doing in your later years of life and should seriously think about something new. Having travelled extensively from competition to competition each weekend, I decided languages should be the next step forward.
With a view to move back to the UK I started studying a BA Honours Degree in Modern Languages with the Open University (German, Spanish and English). Athough the course fees are higher when a non-UK resident (e.g 370 GBP UK fee is then 805 GBP for a non-UK resident), I was planning to move back.
Now, I have been informed that even though I will be resident in the UK (London) as from January 2006, I will have to continue paying double for the next 3 years! (one course fee is 890 GBP and will cost me 1560 GBP - the complete cost of the Degree being almost 8500 GBP).
I had planned to complete this degree and then attend a full-time Masters Degree in Technical translations to become qualified translator (would technical translating be more in demand?).

I would like to work full-time and study part-time in order to pay for my Masters.

Is there a cheaper way? Will it really take me 5 years part-time to obtain a BA Language degree and 1 year full-time Masters?

I have thought about Birkbeck University (London) and the Imperial College (London).

Any career advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks
Esther


[Subject edited by staff or moderator 2005-06-06 19:03]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Languageman  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:09
German to English
+ ...
Consistency Jun 6, 2005

You need to be consistent in the way you present yourself to be believable, I would say. In your post you state "Three years ago I decided that although I love the sport, it isn't a career that you would find yourself doing in your later years of life and should seriously think about something new.", wheras your profile states "Esther has lived in Munich since 1996 working as a freelance translator" and makes no mention of equestrianism. Don´t forget that potential clients are likely to "stalk" your web presence on this site and others.

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Mary Lalevee  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:09
French to English
UK residence Jun 6, 2005

I know there is a requirement for university involving having lived here for three years previously, otherwise you are considered an overseas student.

I don't know any way round that.

Good luck anyway!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Cristina Mazzucchelli  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 19:09
English to Italian
+ ...
I don't know about undergraduate but... Jun 6, 2005

I am Italian and still living in Italy: I'm planning to move to London next fall and I'm applying myself for the MSc in Scienfic Translation @ Imperial College.

What I have been told is that I am considered just as a UK student, since I live and are a citizen of a EU contry. So the fees will be lower then the ones for overseas students.
You've been living in Germany, so I guess there is no problem about that...

Good luck for your undergraduate studies, though!

P.s. there is always the possibility of applying for foundings, but get all the information well in advance...I was too late for that!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jeremy Smith  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:09
French to English
+ ...
UK national Jun 6, 2005

Hi,

Judging solely by your name, I presume you're a UK national with a British passport. If so, why are they saying you should pay rates for people studying from other countries? Seems odd to me, unless you've since taken German citizenship.

Do you already have a first degree? If so, then there's no reason why you can't start translating professionally right now. I only had a first degree (plus, I suppose, some years in the industry) before I started out as a freelance.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
RobinB  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 19:09
German to English
Think about the IoL Diploma Jun 6, 2005

Esther,

Perhaps you should consider the IoL Diploma. Although it's pitched at postgrad level, a lot of people (myself included) think it's much better than many of the "shake 'n bake" postgrad MA translation courses now on offer in the UK. To give just one example, there's a prominent UK MA translation course that requires just 2 hours' translating per week from your first foreign language - not surprisingly, they have a high pass rate, but the degree is no evidence whatsoever of any ability to translate.

You don't necessarily need a degree to take the IoL Diploma exams, and the IoL will advise you on whether you're suitably qualified and/or experienced to take the exam.

Details at:

http://www.iol.org.uk/qualifications/exams_diptrans.asp

Various institutions also offer prep courses for the IoL Diploma (details on the IoL Diploma website).

The thing about non-UK students paying more is pretty standard nowadays. It has nothing to do with nationality, the sole criterion is residence. For example, if you're a British citizen but you didn't live in the UK for at least 2 years (for "non-educational purposes") before you start a degree course at a UK university, you're treated as a foreign student (EU student if you've lived in the EU); one of the consequences is that you're not then eligible for a loan or top-up grant. For the OU, I think the status when you start the course is what counts.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

elzosim  Identity Verified
Local time: 20:09
English to Greek
+ ...
Check it more carefully Jun 6, 2005

[quote]Cristina Mazzucchelli wrote:



What I have been told is that I am considered just as a UK student, since I live and are a citizen of a EU contry. So the fees will be lower then the ones for overseas students.
You've been living in Germany, so I guess there is no problem about that...

quote]

The same applies to me too, a European citizen but not a UK resident applying to courses offered by universities in the UK.
Lower -than those paid by overseas students- fees apply to my case too.
I think you should check this out.

Eleftheria


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Career AdviceCould anyone give me some advice regarding translation qualifications?

Advanced search







SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance
The leading translation software used by over 250,000 translators.

SDL Trados Studio 2017 helps translators increase translation productivity whilst ensuring quality. Combining translation memory, terminology management and machine translation in one simple and easy-to-use environment.

More info »
Across v6.3
Translation Toolkit and Sales Potential under One Roof

Apart from features that enable you to translate more efficiently, the new Across Translator Edition v6.3 comprises your crossMarket membership. The new online network for Across users assists you in exploring new sales potential and generating revenue.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums