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Advice needed on job application
Thread poster: eva75

eva75
English
+ ...
Aug 9, 2005

I am in the middle of preparing a job application and the position that I'm applying for (financial translator) requires several years experience in finance, which I don't have. All in all, I have one year's professional experience that is not directly related to finance, but business-related nonetheless.

However, I do meet all the other criteria. Do you think I have a chance of being selected for interview (I know this depends on the competition, of course) or am I just wasting my time?

Thank you in advance for your advice.


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sokolniki  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 08:33
English to Russian
+ ...
Sorry - you are wasting your time Aug 9, 2005

eva75 wrote:

I am in the middle of preparing a job application and the position that I'm applying for (financial translator) requires several years experience in finance, which I don't have. All in all, I have one year's professional experience that is not directly related to finance, but business-related nonetheless.

However, I do meet all the other criteria. Do you think I have a chance of being selected for interview (I know this depends on the competition, of course) or am I just wasting my time?

Thank you in advance for your advice.



Eva, sorry but you are most likely wasting your time. Being a financial translator and having several years of experience in this specific area are basic requirements for the job and you do not meet them. I know this from my own job hunting experience - the "let's give it a try" approach will not work and you will not have this interview.

Good job hunting!

Bella


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vorloff
Bosnian to English
+ ...
Disagree... Aug 9, 2005

Hi Eva,

I myself have been on the hiring end, trying to recruit highly experienced and talented translators and interpreters, and in the job description we would list a "best case scenario" list of qualifications and requirements. More often than not, however, every candidate would be lacking in at least one area, and we would have to settle on the best choice or the one that interviewed the best, perhaps with a bit lower salary or grade, and probation period, of course.

I would give you the advice to go for it. What do you really have to lose? Unless it is a completely cumbersome application that will take you hours to complete, I would go ahead and complete it and send it in. Worst case scenario, you will get practice polishing your CV, cover letter, etc, and maybe even experience interviewing (which most people sorely need, from my experience), and best case scenario, you will actually get the job.

I'll tell you a little secret: half of the jobs that I have gotten I have not been completely qualified for at the outset. But the best (and sometimes only) way to learn particular skills are on the job (you know the catch 22 - they won't hire you because you don't have the experience; you can't get the experience because they won't hire you). I think that most employers realize that if you are bright, have demonstrated success in picking up skills in the past, and seem like you would "fit into" their organization, it is only a matter of a few months before you will master whatever skill it is that they require. I am not talking about applying for a job that specifies an engineering degree when you don't have one; but you have business translation experience, and more than likely could learn the financial terms by spending a few months reading a lot of related material, past translations, studying any glossaries the company might have, etc.

Not every employer will have this stance, and some will strictly adhere to their requirements, even if it means not hiring anyone. But unless you know that this is the case for this particular employer, why not give it a shot? Anyway, I find pessimism to be one of the greatest obstacles to a successful job search. People sense it and it is off-putting.

Best of luck to you!!

Vera


Izabella Goubnitskaia wrote:

eva75 wrote:

I am in the middle of preparing a job application and the position that I'm applying for (financial translator) requires several years experience in finance, which I don't have. All in all, I have one year's professional experience that is not directly related to finance, but business-related nonetheless.

However, I do meet all the other criteria. Do you think I have a chance of being selected for interview (I know this depends on the competition, of course) or am I just wasting my time?

Thank you in advance for your advice.



Eva, sorry but you are most likely wasting your time. Being a financial translator and having several years of experience in this specific area are basic requirements for the job and you do not meet them. I know this from my own job hunting experience - the "let's give it a try" approach will not work and you will not have this interview.

Good job hunting!

Bella


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Tina Vonhof  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 07:33
Member (2006)
Dutch to English
+ ...
Go for it! Aug 9, 2005

I am in total agreement with Vera. It is likely that none of the applicants will meet all the criteria and in fact you may meet more of them than anyone else. Emphasize your assets, including the fact that you are a quick learner (with examples if you have them) and that you have lots of resources (knowledgeable colleagues, dictionaries and glossaries, etc.) to fall back on. A positive attitude can be your best asset. Go for it!

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RobinB  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 15:33
German to English
Agree with Izabella Aug 9, 2005

I presume that this is a staff job you're applying for.

As somebody who employs (and thus necessarily) recruits financial translators, my view is that if the company wants experienced financial translators, then your chances are pretty slim.

Of course there is a desperate supply/demand imbalance here (there are very few financial translators, and even fewer who can actually translate), but my feeling is that if the company is willing to recruit beginners, they'll say so.

By all means continue with your application, as I assume you won't be disappointed if you're not hired, and you'll possibly gain a better insight into what employers are looking for.

If you're actually interested in financial translation, I'd suggest gaining some additional qualifications to help you on your way (in which case contact me privately), as well as attending relevant translation and client industry training and education events.

Vera wrote:
"it is only a matter of a few months before you will master whatever skill it is that they require. I am not talking about applying for a job that specifies an engineering degree when you don't have one; but you have business translation experience, and more than likely could learn the financial terms by spending a few months reading a lot of related material, past translations, studying any glossaries the company might have, etc."

Not so. It takes a good five years to turn a beginner into a competent financial translator, provided of course that they have the natural translation talent to begin with, plus the ability to take on board a vast amount of subject area knowledge in both languages. It's certainly the equivalent of doing a degree. But unfortunately far too many translators think that finance is a soft option (compared with e.g. natural sciences), which is probably the primary reason why more often than not, financial translations are simply wrong.

Robin

[Edited at 2005-08-09 19:29]


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Dusica Cook  Identity Verified
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Local time: 15:33
English to Bosnian
+ ...
i would apply Aug 9, 2005

i have often found myself in a position to want to apply for a position, but was discouraged because i would not have one of 10 requirements. the same number of times i saw that people would employ someone else, who had less requirements than me, but would a) lie, b) apply anyhow, c) have luck!

so... i ended up short for a couple of jobs which i would have completed better than the people who got them!

apply, there is nothing to lose! anyhow, you will be given the test before they actually interview you (at least, there should be an eliminatory test for this kind of positions), and you will have your chance there!

even if you do not have many years of required experience, but if you are a dedicated and a hard working person, you will overcome that problem in less than 6 months... you will learn, make your own glossaries of terminology used, research...

do not fear! just apply! best of luck!


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Paul Lambert  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:33
French to English
+ ...
Go for it! Aug 9, 2005

Like the others have said, you have absolutely nothing to lose! I have just accepted an offer of a Project Management job I didn't think I'd get when I sent off my CV - I liked the company and sent my CV through on the off chance I might get an interview. Now, a month later I'm planning my move to Madrid and have the job of a lifetime! You have nothing to lose - and, if you don't get it, then just put it down to experience and keep trying!!!

Good luck!!

Paul


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Johan Jongman  Identity Verified
Ireland
Local time: 15:33
English to Dutch
+ ...
Why not just apply... Aug 9, 2005

... and see what happens? I wouldn't get my hopes up too high but you never know.

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elzosim  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:33
English to Greek
+ ...
Go for it! Aug 9, 2005

But do not get disappointed in case they don't call you for interview.

Eleftheria


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xxx@caduceus
United States
Local time: 07:33
English to German
+ ...
Let the hiring company be the judge Aug 9, 2005

I agree with Vera on this one and suggest you go for it.

If the hiring company does not find your experience to be suitable enough, they will let you know. And even then, it may be disappointing at first, but you haven't really lost anything.

But if you don't at least try things like this, you may give away the chance to rise to new heights, gain experience, or discover a specific talent/interest that you may otherwise never knew you had.

I have applied for jobs that I did not necessarily "pre-qualify" for entirely and ended up getting them anyway, mainly because of other qualities, which the employer thought outweighed the lack of expertise in other fields.

If you feel confident in yourself that you may be a good fit for this company, then trust your instinct and don't let other people hold you back.

You'd be amazed at how things may work out in the end!


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French Foodie  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:33
French to English
+ ...
Congratulations Paul Aug 10, 2005

On landing your dream job! That's always so encouraging to hear.

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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 15:33
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
If you think you're suited for the job, then you should apply Aug 10, 2005

eva75 wrote:
However, I do meet all the other criteria. Do you think I have a chance of being selected for interview (I know this depends on the competition, of course) or am I just wasting my time?


Applying for a job is rarely a waste of your own time, although it may be a slight waste of the employer's time, especially if they get loads of unqualified applications. However, that's the risk the employer takes by inviting applications

If for some reason you want to limit the number of applications you make, then you should try to figure out what is the *primary requirement* of the job. If this is a financial job, and they require 10 years' financial experience, then it'll make no difference if you satisfy *all* other requirements 100% if you don't have at least 8 years' financial experience.


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Paul Lambert  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 06:33
French to English
+ ...
Thanks Mara!!! Aug 10, 2005

Mara Bertelsen wrote:

On landing your dream job! That's always so encouraging to hear.


Thanks for the congratulations Mara! I went into the translation world to work as a Project Manager, but saw it as a long uphill struggle before I'd get there - never believed I'd get a PM job living in Spain by the age of 26!!!!

So yes - to anyone else out there who is unsure about job applications - just send through your CV anyways - you have nothing to lose and EVERYTHING to gain!!!!

Paul


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