Any alternatives to registering as 'aut贸nomo' in Spain?
Thread poster: Simon Bruni

Simon Bruni  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:07
Member (2009)
Spanish to English
Dec 19, 2005

Dear Translators in Spain,

I am currently living in Spain, and managing to make a living as a translator.

I think it would be nearly impossible for me to subsist, however, if I had to pay the EUR 230 per month needed to register as 'aut贸nomo'. At the moment I am lucky enough to be able to invoice through a company that pays my social security (I probably couldn't work as a translator if it wasn't for this), but this is a contingency and eventually I will have to find another solution.

As I am relatively near the beginning of my career (5 months as freelance after a couple of years in-house in the UK) my earning capacity is fairly low, and I really need to avoid the extra 'aut贸nomo' costs if at all possible., at least until I am more established.

What do new translators normally do before they have built up a large client base? Do we bite the bullet and pay (what seems to me), this extortionate rate?

Any ideas or advice is greatly appreciated.

Oh, and Feliz Navidad!


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Andrea Torre  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:07
Member (2004)
French to Spanish
+ ...
Hola Simon Dec 19, 2005

Yo me encontr茅 en la misma situaci贸n que t煤 hace unos cuatro a帽os, cuando por fin decid铆 dejar mi trabajo en plantilla y meterme de lleno como aut贸noma. Pues bueno, creo recordar que si no facturas una "X" cantidad al a帽o no est谩s obligado a darte de alta en la SS. Cr茅eme que me cost贸 enterarme de ese detalle porque no te lo dicen de buenas a primeras o, sencillamente, no lo saben. Por lo menos esa fue mi experiencia.
No recuerdo la cantidad ni si sigue funcionando de esa manera pero bueno, a lo mejor te ayuda saber que existe esta posibilidad.

Te deseo mucha suerte.
Andrea


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Angela Arnone  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:07
Member (2004)
Italian to English
+ ...
Please don't post in Spanish here! Dec 19, 2005

This is an English forum .....
Thank you
Moderator

Andrea Torre wrote:

Yo me encontr茅 en la misma situaci贸n que t煤 hace unos cuatro a帽os, cuando por fin decid铆 dejar mi trabajo en plantilla y meterme de lleno como aut贸noma. Pues bueno, creo recordar que si no facturas una "X" cantidad al a帽o no est谩s obligado a darte de alta en la SS. Cr茅eme que me cost贸 enterarme de ese detalle porque no te lo dicen de buenas a primeras o, sencillamente, no lo saben. Por lo menos esa fue mi experiencia.
No recuerdo la cantidad ni si sigue funcionando de esa manera pero bueno, a lo mejor te ayuda saber que existe esta posibilidad.

Te deseo mucha suerte.
Andrea


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Anjo Sterringa  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:07
Member (2003)
English to Dutch
+ ...
We bite the bullet and pay Dec 19, 2005

And believe me, it's not that much compared to what you have to pay as an 'autonomo' in other countries. Taxation in Spain is quite reasonable..... Good luck! Anjo

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Kit Cree  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:07
Member (2003)
French to English
+ ...
IRPF reductions? Dec 20, 2005

Hi Simon,
I'm afraid I agree with Anjo and to be honest looking at your language combinations and specialities I would have thought that you would be making enough to cover your social security. I know it's hard when you first start out, we've all been there but the work is out there and it's a question of working really hard until you're earning what you want to.
However, i think that now for your first year as an 'autonomo' you only pay 7% IRPF. Go to the Hacienda in your town and ask about it.
Good luck and don't give up!
Kit


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 21:07
Spanish to English
+ ...
careful with the IRPF reduction Dec 20, 2005

I have been following some discussion on an e-mail list in the last couple days about deducting only 7% for IRPF. Apparently this can be done for the first 3 years you work as a freelancer; however, it may not be such a great idea, because it's not a reduction in the tax itself, but a reduction in what is being withheld for that tax. You run the risk that it may all catch up with you when it's time to do your yearly Declaraci贸n de la Renta--i.e., you may have to shell out a lump sum then to make up for not having enough deducted throughout the year.

As far as the original question is concerned: I'm another one who "bit the bullet," as you say. I've seen a lot of discussion about what Andrea brought up, but it seems that everyone who tries to find out "officially" gets a different story. You might want to try asking at your local office--and if they tell you it's possible, make sure to get it in writing.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Cintia Pecellin  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:07
Member (2003)
English to Spanish
Why 230鈧 a month? Dec 20, 2005

I'm a Spanish translator as well, have been legally working (as we all should) for several years now, and I only pay 175鈧 a month for social security.
Personally, I don't think anyone should have a choice of whether or not to become an 'aut贸nomo', that's the law, and the rest of us are indeed covering our social security fees and paying our taxes, thus having to offer higher rates to our clients... Although you mention you're working for a company, right?
Sometimes, not meant personally (!!), some translators mention they manage to make a living without following these legal steps... well, I'm not going to congratulate anyone on those practises.



[Edited at 2005-12-20 10:29]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Timothy Barton
Local time: 20:07
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Until your earning 600鈧 a month, don't register SS Dec 20, 2005

Although there is a bit of a legal void, there is jurisprudence to back you up if you earn below 600鈧 and don't pay SS. Another option is to register for one month once every three months or so, and bill everything during that month.

It is true about the IRPF reduction, but it doesn't really make much difference. When you make your term declaration you have less to deduct from the 20% you have to pay, so you just end up paying more later on. ie, whether you pick 7% or 15% IRPF, at the end of the term you'll have paid 20%.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pilar T. Bayle  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:07
English to Spanish
+ ...
Many translators don't know... Dec 20, 2005


Sometimes, not meant personally (!!), some translators mention they manage to make a living without following these legal steps... well, I'm not going to congratulate anyone on those practises.


That Hacienda and SS will be hooked up sometime and they will be able to pinpoint your earnings as well as the date when you decided to sign up for the SS. If the dates do not coincide, they will make you pay for whatever months you were not registered in the SS. The other thing is that SS covers your downtime for sickness and your medical expenses. If you get sick, your downtime will not be covered, but your medical expenses will be, hence you are just going to the piggy bank for money, and unfortunately, pigs are short-lived.

The other thing many people don't know is that banks rattle off on your earnings. So unless you are planning on getting the traditional under-the-table payment, it is not a good idea to try to beat Hacienda/SS. In the end, believe or not, they are the smart guys.

The real choice NEW registrated people in the SS have is to request a lower payment for being new. And that works, is legal and carries no foreseeable penalties.

P.
www.pbayle.com/blogs

[Edited at 2005-12-20 11:25]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
John Simpson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:07
Member (2004)
French to English
+ ...
Are you under 31 (or 32)? Dec 20, 2005

If you are under 31 or 32, you have to pay approximately 鈧150 per month for your social security. This goes up to 鈧200 on your 31st or 32nd birthday. At least, this is what I am paying here in Madrid.

Have you thought about giving English conversation classes to tide you over?

Suerte,

John


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Simon Bruni  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:07
Member (2009)
Spanish to English
TOPIC STARTER
thanks to all contributers Jan 9, 2006

Hello to everyone. I just wanted to thank you all for your advice in my forum post, it was greatly appreciated and will be put to good use. A happy new year to everyone

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Scheherezade Suria Lopez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 21:07
English to Spanish
+ ...
registering is better... Jan 14, 2006

I agree with John. I started this "adventure" registering only for one month but believe me, having to declare everything at the same time was a pain in the... I had to pay 1000 euros for 2 bills... out of the blue!! Besides, it can be thought improper if you keep telling your customers you will send your bills later on.

Moreover, if you are doing it via an agency, the cost of registering and then cancelling is not worth it. In my experience, that was about 100 more for their expenses.

On the whole I think it's better to register, if you can. I'm currently paying 150, like John said. I'm under 30 and this is my first year, so it's not that bad.

隆Good luck and happy 2006 to you, too!

Scheherezade


Direct link Reply with quote
 
jsf2111
English
New to Spain with lots of questions Jan 23, 2009

Hello all,
In advance, thanks for the help. So, I have just arrived to Spain and work as a freelance English teacher/tutor. I have worked here before giving conversation classes and getting paid in cash/being illegal (i know, i know, I'm a bad guy)...
Anyway, now I just returned and have found a job working as a teacher in a school. The head professor asked if I was autonomo, which requires that I pay my own SS. Obvious. However, I have not yet registered for anything (I am from the US) - do I have to register as autonomo? Will this school ever even know if I am doing this, or do they just pass me the check and then forget about it? If she just gives me a check every week (I am not making that much, by the way) can't I just deposit it to my bank account and continue living illegally (especially if I am only planning on being here under 6 months...)? Or, could I sign the check over to a Spanish friend and have he or she deposit it for me and give me the cash, thus the banks wouldn't be able to tell the government what a bad guy I am being?
I know that many do not approve of working illegally, and I understand it completely. However, as for right now I am not earning nearly enough to be giving close to 200Euros of it away every month. Also, as it is a temporary arrangement (my girlfriend graduates in June, then we will probably go someplace else) is it worth registering, or will this company that pays me ever even know if I am illegal?
Thank you for helping me overcome my ignorance!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 21:07
Spanish to English
+ ...
proof will probably be requested Jan 23, 2009

jsf2111 wrote:

Will this school ever even know if I am doing this, or do they just pass me the check and then forget about it?


The school will most likely ask you for proof of your registration as an "aut贸nomo" and also for proof of your latest Social Security payment. That's what I was asked for some years ago when I was doing the same thing you're planning to do, teaching English (my classes were at a company) through a school. I can't imagine they would just take your word for it, since they can have serious problems if they hire illegal workers. Also, if they take you on as an "aut贸nomo", you will probably have to give them an invoice every month for your services, in which case you'll need a tax I.D. number (N.I.E. in your case).


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Any alternatives to registering as 'aut贸nomo' in Spain?

Advanced search







SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums