Mobile menu

Junior Translator in UK: Mission Impossible?
Thread poster: Antonio Asensio Pérez
Antonio Asensio Pérez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 11:36
English to Spanish
+ ...
Feb 23, 2006

Hi all,

first of all I'd like to thank you for those good tips given thorough these fora. You've been helping me a lot.

Here goes my question:

How difficult can be to get a junior translator job in a translation agency/company in UK?

I'm off to London by April.

I got a translation degree (almost, yet missing a single subject to pass in June) and some experience as a translator. Will this one-subject-to-pass syndrome be a real obstacle?

Now I'm snail-designing my website, resume, CV....following carefully your advices

Thanks in advance

Eng/Fr > Spa (Castillian)
Specialities: Legal, Marketing, EU


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxIreneN
United States
Local time: 05:36
English to Russian
+ ...
Never say never! Feb 24, 2006

Think big!

Antonio, cling to these two mottos regardless and you'll get there. When I was living in the USSR I have dreamt about seeing any one Western European country once before I die:-).
Now the world is at my feet:-), all "visaless" and I live in my own house. Trust me, it's much harder to get from USSR to the United States and build a career than to move from Spain to London today:-)

"mission impossible" mood is a road to nowhere. Strike it out of your dictionary, I command you, junior:-):-):-):-)

Just don't expect everything to happen tomorrow:-)

Best of the luck,
Irene


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Antonio Asensio Pérez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 11:36
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Spasheeba Irene Feb 24, 2006

I am aware of the long road out of home...I had Russian teachers whose working capacity and demanding levels made me think of how hard could it be to jump to the West...

I know my position is priviligiated being Spanish in comparision with, let's say, Bielorussian or even Czech... As a good slavophile I am fully awared of that fact. And sometimes ashamed.

Thanks again for the moral support.

My aim is to be trained properly after my translation degree. Since my english sucks and is latin-thinking-embbeded I decided to do the UK.

I have read whatever is possible to read out of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting without becoming a member. Excelent reports and statistics but a couple of years old.

What I really am looking forward is to obtain data about my language combination in UK:

are they in "shortage" of Castillian translators?

perhaps do they need more Latin American Spanish?

are there any major differences between the UK market and the one of the continent?

Is London Castillian translator-saturated?

Thanks again to you all.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Angela Arnone  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:36
Member (2004)
Italian to English
+ ...
You mean your English leaves somewhat to be desired? Feb 24, 2006

Don't put that in your CV!

I think you'll find that London is saturated by every language under the sun, but don't let that put you off, although personally I'd seek a British location that is slightly less exhausting. But then again I'm pretty old and I was attracted to the bright lights of The Smoke myself, many moons ago. It was a worthwhile experience as far as it went and made me appreciate where I had to go afterwards.
Bonne chance
Angela

PS - I'm not sure why you don't just get that final exam out of the way and then set off?


Antonio Asensio Pérez wrote:
.... Since my english sucks and is latin-thinking-embbeded I decided to do the UK.


[Edited at 2006-02-24 10:38]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Antonio Asensio Pérez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 11:36
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Non natives always leave somewhat to be desired Feb 24, 2006

Thanks for sharing your experience, Angela.

As I said above, non natives always leave somewhat to be desired...even "bilinguals"...if they really exist. Specially when it comes to "output" rather than to "input"...that's why I just work into my mother tongue. I don't want to be as many translators I've seen around claiming to be "bilinguals": most of them dropping rates up to 0.3 Eur cents....I think that, at least among colleagues, being humble should be a pro.

According to my last subject to pass, I got to wait 3 months till I get rid of it....why not to cross the channel in the meanwhile and learn over the terrain? By the way, London is just the "gates". I know it as a tourist and, yes, quite a furious place. I wouldn't mind to get a wonderful in-house job in a calm middle-sized town in Oxfordshire....who would?

However, I'd like to adquire in-house translator skills in an English speaking country and OZ seems to be too far away.

Any tip?

Something like :

"Knowing by heart Samuelsson-Brown's translation handling process wouldn't help you without an official degree."

or

"Your TM command is worthless right now since as a junior translator you'll simply proof-read, so make sure your proof marks are the standard ones"


Eager to learn of you all.


P.D. Don't worry, Angela, I'll not write that on my CV.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Angela Arnone  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:36
Member (2004)
Italian to English
+ ...
So wise for one so young! Feb 24, 2006

Try SDL in the UK - they may help you out with a temporary inhouse position.
Angela

Antonio Asensio Pérez wrote:
...that's why I just work into my mother tongue.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Antonio Asensio Pérez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 11:36
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Grazie tante, Angela Feb 24, 2006

Thanks for the advice, Angela.

The more I read the more I realize I don't have any idea of how this business/art works.

Time to time.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Rebecca Lowery  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:36
French to English
Some jobsites in the UK for you to try Feb 24, 2006

In-house translator jobs in the UK are often listed on on-line job sites. They are usually updated daily so it's a good idea to keep checking.
The most popular sites are as follows: www.reed.co.uk
www.gojobsite.co.uk

I've just had a look at the Reed site and think there may be an in-house position in Berkshire you may be interested in. That's just outside of London and the competition may not be as fierce!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
markj
German to English
+ ...
A tip from me Feb 24, 2006

Hi Antonio

I think you're best bet would to send your CV now to employment agencies in London that specialise in language jobs, so that you have some contacts before you get there. If you'd like me to send you a list of them, just send me an e-mail.

Good luck!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Antonio Asensio Pérez  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 11:36
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you all Feb 25, 2006

just being following the tips.

Gracias


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Junior Translator in UK: Mission Impossible?

Advanced search


Translation news





Protemos translation business management system
Create your account in minutes, and start working! 3-month trial for agencies, and free for freelancers!

The system lets you keep client/vendor database, with contacts and rates, manage projects and assign jobs to vendors, issue invoices, track payments, store and manage project files, generate business reports on turnover profit per client/manager etc.

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs