Getting established in Oz
Thread poster: Alex Boladeras
Alex Boladeras  Identity Verified
Indonesia
Local time: 02:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
Aug 9, 2006

Dear Prozians

What do you think is the demand for translators of English into Spanish in Oz? I am a fairly well-established (as "well-established" as one can be in this profession) freelancer wishing to emigrate to Australia (or rather, whether the Australian immigration authorities would allow me to). I am fairly confident I would be able to preserve my current client base despite of the time difference but still...

I would really appreciate any thoughts that you may have.

Cheers,
Alex


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Patricia Colombera
Local time: 15:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
good luck Aug 9, 2006

Alex,
I won't answer your question because I have no clue about the market in Oz. However, I wish you good luck. I love Australia (specially Brisbane) and it's my dream to live there for a while since I'm an English-Spanish translator too.
Anyway, I'm sure you can keep your clients in spite of the time difference, it's just a matter of organization and meeting dealines.
Break a leg.
Patricia


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Jande  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 04:55
Danish to English
+ ...
I am confident you'll be able to preserve your client base. Aug 9, 2006

A friend of mine teaches Spanish privately and lives off it. It was her who put me onto translating and teaching Danish in the first place. There are many people here who want to learn Spanish, not only adults, but children as well.

The translating clients I have are usually fine with the time difference. In my experience the most problems you will have are with the source language based companies who are not used to working with source lanaguage to English translators in such different time zones.

It can become a week long excercise in those cases to get a confirmation, because they send one email and wait for a responce, which is the next day and then send another and so on. Otherwise most companies understand and send you files and confirmations at the same time so you can start on the job. Some companies prefer it because they can get their translation in the morning on the due date rather than in the evening.

Plus there are translation companies here who require Spanish to English translations, so you may end up with more clients even though you may lose other source language based clients.

Good Luck


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Marisa Schiavi  Identity Verified
Local time: 02:55
Member
Spanish to English
+ ...
Not trying to discourage you, but.... Aug 10, 2006

Hi Alex!

I don't want to discourage you but I arrived in Australia almost three years ago now and it took me a little while to start working as a translator here. Now I'm doing very well and I have lots of work, but most of my clients are from abroad... It would be great if you can maintain those contacts you've mentioned, but the truth is that the demand within Australia for translation into LOTE languages (as they call them here - languages other than English) is not huge. I live in Western Australia, Perth, which makes it even more isolated, if you go to Sydney or Melbourne you might be better off, it is a great place to live in but I would suggest talking to your clients and see what they think before you make your final decision. Of course there are other things you could do apart from translation, I know there is a huge demand for interpreters but you would have to pass a NAATI test for that.
You can contact me directly if you would like to hear more about translation in Australia or at least about my own experience here.

Best of luck!
Marisa


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Alex Boladeras  Identity Verified
Indonesia
Local time: 02:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks everyone... a few more questions... Aug 10, 2006

Thansk everyone for your useful thoughts! I am now a bit more reassured. It's certainly useful to know that I should be able to preseve my client base and that I could live off teaching Spanish if things go wrong.



I have been advised by a migration consultant that the only possibility available to me is via the Skilled Independent Regional (SIR) programme. This is because I "just"score 115 under the normal SKilled Independent Migration scheme, the pass mark being 120. Even under the SIR my options are limited to Sout Australia (Adelaide and environs). Apparently SA is the only state that does not make it a requirement that your nominated occupation be in the relevant state's SIR list.

Now, can I ask you how did you emigrate? I mean, did you pass the points test?

Cheers!!)

Alex


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