Mobile menu

getting payed
Thread poster: juholding
juholding  Identity Verified
Norway
Local time: 19:48
French to Norwegian
+ ...
Feb 9, 2008

hello,
I am relatively new to working through the Internet.
My question is to those of you who are experienced in this area.
when taking a job for a foreign translator company, how can I be sure that they will pay me for the job?
And, also what do I do if they don't pay?

Thank you for your answer(s)

Regards,
Unni


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Capicuan Girl
English to Spanish
Hi... Feb 9, 2008

... up to my own experience, it is up to you deciding whether a client is worth giving the try or not. I'd say, stick for big companies whenever possible. On the other hand, think that even in your own country you can be really far from your client. In this case, the only difference between this client and a foreign one is language and legislation. But as I said before, if you are going to be unpaid anyway, it doesn't matter wherever your client is. The proceed will be slow, and you will be angry and upset anyway.

[Edited at 2008-02-09 11:34]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Attila Piróth  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 19:48
Member
English to Hungarian
+ ...
BlueBoard + PO Feb 9, 2008

juholding wrote:

hello,
I am relatively new to working through the Internet.
My question is to those of you who are experienced in this area.
when taking a job for a foreign translator company, how can I be sure that they will pay me for the job?
And, also what do I do if they don't pay?

Thank you for your answer(s)

Regards,
Unni


Hi Unni,
You will find a lot of useful information if you search the forums. You will find a great checklist in Ralf Lemster's article: http://www.proz.com/translation-articles/articles/84/1/Managing-Business-Risk
As a minimum, check the Blue Board; you will find translators' feedback for thousands of translation agencies. Also, make sure to get a purchase order before starting the job, with the contact data of the outsourcer and the details of the job.
And you will find an extremely funny nonetheless instructive read here: http://www.proz.com/topic/88535
Kind regards,
Attila


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Oleg Rudavin  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 20:48
Member (2003)
English to Ukrainian
+ ...
Check Blue Board first Feb 9, 2008

juholding wrote:when taking a job for a foreign translator company, how can I be sure that they will pay me for the job?


Check Blue Board. That's basically the first place where you will find outsourcers listed, amd often rated based on the thranslators' willingness to work with particular outsourcers in the future.

There are other resources available on the Web.

ANd generally, if you are cautious enough, the non-payment is negligible. For myself, it's less than 0.1% for 6 years of freelance.

what do I do if they don't pay?


The best way to avoid such situations is to prevent them. Something is broken cannot always be repaired; same with non-payment. So check the client's credibility, use your good judgement and don't accept any jobs if you smell a rat

Cheers,
Oleg


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 19:48
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
You can't be 100% sure Feb 10, 2008

juholding wrote:
When taking a job for a foreign translator company, how can I be sure that they will pay me for the job?


There is no way to be 100% sure. Even if you're dealing with a local client, you can't be 100% sure, unless you demand payment in advance. Trust is part of business. You have to trust the client to pay you, and the client has to trust that you'll do the job good and on time.

There are remedies for those who breach contracts, and the remedies are slightly easier with a local client, but ultimately the best way to prevent getting burnt is to ensure that you and the client trust each other.

Remember, even locally it may require too many resources to get your money out of an unrepentant client. So don't shirk from dealing with international clients because they are "more difficult to get to" -- that's false logic, believe me.

Trust your gut. Find out if the client has verifiable contact details. If the job is small, take a chance. If the job is big, be more careful the first time round.

And, also what do I do if they don't pay?


Then you're in for a long process (but this applies to local clients too). I'm sure there are threads in the archives about what to do when clients don't pay. Do a forum search, and when you find useful answers, post their URLs here, won't you?


[Edited at 2008-02-10 06:57]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:48
English to German
+ ...
How about something encouraging for a change Feb 10, 2008

Hi Unni,

Welcome to the tribe!

After approximately three weeks working through the internet you will figure out that our planet is a darn' tiny place. A client all of the sudden is not thousands of miles, but only a phone call or an email away. You will get used to it and it's fascinating.

That clients on different continents are less likely to pay you because you are far away is absurd. That's our job - bridging continents. You will love it.

Here is from a colleague with clients in 11 different countries on 4 different continents and none of them has ever been late with payments during all those years.

How this is possible? The colleagues are right. If you are offered a project, check the identity first. And take full advantage of proz.com. Priceless.

Best of luck!

My very best regards,

Nicole


Direct link Reply with quote
 
juholding  Identity Verified
Norway
Local time: 19:48
French to Norwegian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you! Feb 10, 2008

Thank You!
These are all very good and useful tips!
My shoulders are not so knotted anymore;)
Extra thanks for the check-list!
Unni


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

getting payed

Advanced search


Translation news





memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »
WordFinder
The words you want Anywhere, Anytime

WordFinder is the market's fastest and easiest way of finding the right word, term, translation or synonym in one or more dictionaries. In our assortment you can choose among more than 120 dictionaries in 15 languages from leading publishers.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs