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Accessing e-mail while travelling
Thread poster: Armorel Young

Armorel Young  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:54
Member (2004)
German to English
Sep 11, 2004

On my desktop computer at home I've recently gone over to broadband using an ntl cable modem. If I get a laptop (as I'm planning to do) how will I use the laptop to access the internet when I'm travelling? - because I won't any longer have a dial-up subscription that I can use from more or less anywhere.

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IrinaGM  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:54
English to Georgian
+ ...
Buy a laptop with a wireless card/access Sep 11, 2004

I too take my laptop while I travel on business. I don't know about UK but there are a lot of wireless hot spots in the United States, in airports, hotels and coffee shops. Sometimes you have to pay, sometimes they're free. I also carry a cable with me because a lot of airports and hotels offer cable access as well. So definitely buy a laptop with a wireless card or built-in wireless access.

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Armorel Young  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:54
Member (2004)
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
What's baffling me is ... Sep 11, 2004

through what service provider do I connect to the internet when I'm out and about? Because at home I use my broadband modem - but I don't pick that up and take it with my laptop, do I? - and I don't have a subscription to another service provider that I can use away from home. Or is there something I have completely misunderstood somewhere?

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nettranslatorde
Member
Russian to German
+ ...
Use an Internet-by-call provider Sep 11, 2004

Hi Amorel,

How about using an Internet-by-call provider? I have a modem card in my Laptop and can use any telephone socket to connect to the Internet using ther service of one of the Internet by call providers. There are several providers which are extremely cheap....just an option....good luck anyway.

Kerstin

[Edited at 2004-09-11 20:58]


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xxxsarahl
Local time: 22:54
English to French
+ ...
Your ISP should have the answer Sep 11, 2004

Your laptop has a built-in modem.
As for the details of connecting through your ISP when you're on the road, it all depends on the type of connection you have access to. You should ask your ISP, they must have some kind of ready solution, as most laptop owners are in this same situation.
Sarah


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IrinaGM  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 01:54
English to Georgian
+ ...
If yor laptop has a wireless card, it will automatically pick up available services in the area Sep 12, 2004

if your laptop has a wireless card, it will automatically pick up available services in the area you're in. Sometimes these services are free and sometimes there is charge. You can choose from daily charge to weekly, to monthly depending on how long you're going to stay in that area. Hope that helps.

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Tom Bishop
Local time: 05:54
French to English
+ ...
Mobile email solutions Sep 12, 2004

There are a number of options available to you; the most appropriate will depend upon a number of factors, including your destination location(s) and your intended means of connecting to the Internet (mobile dial-up or landline, mobile GPRS, perhaps Wi-Fi if available).

I assume that you wish to use your standard email client (such as Outlook) rather than webmail.

Many UK ISPs provide a dial-up number that can be accessed from abroad; it is worth checking whether NTL do this. If using mobile dial-up within Europe, you will find that most UK mobile operators have a flat rate for calls within Europe, so it costs the same to call back to the UK as to dial a local number in the foreign country. You may, however, find that using GPRS is more cost-effective. You should be able to obtain the required settings for GPRS from the manual for your mobile and from your ISP. In order to send email so that it appears to come from your normal email address, it is best to set up a separate email account within your email client, using your normal email address (From and Reply to) and POP3 server, but specifying the SMTP server of your mobile operator.

If using a landline principally from one or two countries, it is worthwhile setting up a free Internet account with ISPs in those countries, enabling you to connect for the cost of a local call (but bear in mind that hotels may apply a surcharge). You might require adaptors to plug in to foreign telephone sockets. It is possible to access a POP3 mailbox from any connection, not only through the relevant ISP. In order to send email so that it appears to come from your normal email address, it is best to set up a separate email account within your email client, using your normal email address (From and Reply to) and POP3 server, but specifying the SMTP server of the ISP whose connection you are using.

Alternatively, there are companies that provide a local connection facility on a worldwide basis. This is probably not worthwhile if connecting via a UK mobile, but could be worth considering if travelling widely and using landlines for connection.


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Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 06:54
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
how I do it... Sep 13, 2004

Hi Amorel!

Here's how I do it:

- at home I have four computers running on a small network.
- I have a 4-port router plugged in to the DSL modem
- I have a WLAN access point plugged in to the router, and my 2 desktops go straight into the router
- my two laptops have Internet access via the WLAN access point (they have WLAN cards).
- My e-mail runs on Outlook, I have my own domain for my e-mail address

So when I have to travel, I just pick up my main laptop, and head for the wilds. My parents also have a wireless network at their house in the UK, and when I'm there all I have to do is just switch on my laptop and bingo! I'm on line.

The same thing also works in Internet cafes with WLAN facilities, and some airport lounges, train stations, etc. That means that you are accessing the Internet via THEIR provider, not your own.

Sometimes you have to pay a fee for the WLAN access at these "hotspots", sometimes you don't.

When my brother was driving around the US recently he kept passing through hotspots - so when he was in one he had Internet access.

That is also another reason to make sure that you have a safe WLAN network. Otherwise your neighbors could be using your WLAN to access the Internet (at your expense!).

Kind regards,

Alison


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