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Can you become #1 in Google within months?
Thread poster: Selçuk Budak

Selçuk Budak  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:29
English to Turkish
+ ...
Apr 7, 2005

Yes, but until someone finds you out and reports to google!

Recently, while studying online the dynamics of search engines I discovered a site that ranked very high both in PR (6) and SERP positions for almost all language pairs in google with most relevant keywords such as "english turkish translation," or "english spanish translation," etc.
The site was an empy site with hundreds of empty pages consisting of only a title and a self-link that in turn consisted of only keywords.
It was a story of a true success in terms of SEO (search engine optimization).
When google is searched for the most relevant keywords ("english yourlanguage translation"), it yielded the following SERP positions:

English Turkish Translation = 2
English Chinese Translation = 8
English Japanese Translation = 9
English Spanish Translation = 17
English French Translation = 19

It was even ranking better than proz!
And if not intervened, I am certain that it would be among the top 10 for other language pairs as well.
I discovered an identical site, and reported both to google.

Also, I wrote a short article and submitted it to a couple of publishers.
Luckily, one of them published my article.
And Google was really quick to respond.
Now, the site in question has a page rank of 0. Google dropped it from all search keywords.
When you search, for example, "english spanish translation" + sitename (internetpublicpolicy), the only link points to my short article about this issue!

You may find my short article interesting if you plan to build a private website and want to know how you can become #1 in google within months if you dare to do it!

Article can be found here:
http://www.storebuilder.co.uk/contentid-256.html

Selçuk Budak
www.turktrans.net


[Edited at 2005-04-07 08:56]


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 17:29
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
You can also do it honestly Apr 8, 2005

Selçuk Budak wrote:
The site was an empy site with hundreds of empty pages consisting of only a title and a self-link that in turn consisted of only keywords. ... It was a story of a true success in terms of SEO (search engine optimization).


You can also get it right if you do it honestly, but then you need to target keywords that are not as popular.

Here's my story: I had a web site at afrikaans-english.com and managed to get it to #1 in Google within three months for my chosen keywords. Granted, the keywords were non-popular and included "afrikaans", which is not a common language. Then my domain was hijacked and I had to register a new domain (the worst nightmare of anyone who's gotten a high position in Google). My new domain, leuce.com/translate, was again #1 in Google within about five months.

I don't use underhanded methods like doorway pages, keyword spamming etc. I simply follow the rules of good SEO:

1. Make your site content rich.
2. Make your site search engine friendly (no frames, good logical structure, text-based links, etc).
3. Plan, plan, plan... and then implement. Don't design a whole site and then think of SEO as an afterthought.
4. Submit to search engines *manually*.
5. Get listed in DMOZ (preferably more than one listing).
6. Exchange links.
7. etc.

I can recommend apromotionguide.com for some very good free advice (I'm not affiliated to that site).

I also hereby invite all translators to submit their links to DMOZ. I'm the volunteer editor for the Translation tree, but please note that I *do not* guarantee a listing and I always judge a submitted site by DMOZ listing rules. It's always worth a try, and a DMOZ listing will boost your ranking in Google.

==

Miracles also happen. Another site of mine, murray.za.net, got listed in Google within 2 weeks, got indexes by Google within another 2 weeks, got listed in Yahoo and MSN within another 2 weeks, and got listed (with return-traffic) in several subject-specific lists and search engines. All it takes is hard work and a lot of luck.


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Lesley Clayton
France
Local time: 17:29
French to English
+ ...
How can someone hijack a domain name? Apr 8, 2005

Samuel Murray wrote:

Then my domain was hijacked and I had to register a new domain (the worst nightmare of anyone who's gotten a high position in Google).



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Selçuk Budak  Identity Verified
Local time: 19:29
English to Turkish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Hijacking Apr 8, 2005

Hijacking is easy and really may ruin the good reputation of target sites.

The simplest way is to "steal content," i.e., to copy the content of target site into one's own. And there is no way to prevent this. Even you devise code to prevent it (through .htaccess, save protection, no-right click, etc.), the people would copy your site simply by typing from the keyboard.

Another simple way is to issue a 302 redirect which Google and other engines treat as spam. This type of hijacking is deliberately aims at stealing and ruining the reputation of target site. Even, google considers the spammer (302 redirecter) as the true owner of the target site. How ridiculous!

These and other methods are discussed at various forums some of which can be found below:

http://www.pandia.com/sw-2004/40-hijack.html
http://www.webmasterworld.com/forum30/28329.htm

------
By the way, if you do not consider migrating (moving) your site to another service provider, LOCK your domain. This would save you much headache.



[Edited at 2005-04-08 14:10]


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 17:29
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
How to hijack a domain Apr 10, 2005

Lesley Clayton wrote:

Samuel Murray wrote:

Then my domain was hijacked and I had to register a new domain (the worst nightmare of anyone who's gotten a high position in Google).



How can someone hijack a domain name?



This generally refers to when a domain name's registration expires and the current owner is not quick enough to reregister it, and someone else registers it.

In my case, my original host registered the domain in THEIR name instead of mine, and when THEY went out of business, I lost the domain name because I was unable to prove to the registrar that the domain does in fact belong to me. I was very upset when I discovered that the original host registered the domain in their name instead of mine... this is not how it should be done.

Usually your registrar will notify you a couple of months or weeks in advance if you domain registration is about to expire, and you can renew your registration before it expires. Some registrars also permit you to register for more than one year at a time (although I'm not sure what the situation will be if the registrar goes out of business). My current registrar automatically reregisters my domains when they are due by deducting the amount from my credit card each year.

Domain hijacking companies hijack domains because those domains have high search engine rankings even though the web sites may have changed. My original domain, afrikaans-english.com, had #1 position in Google for its chosen keywords, and so it was put up for sale for quite a high price (one which I would not pay). Of course, in due time Google recrawled the hijacked domain and upon discovering that it no longer contained the original content, it dropped the domain from its high ranking. Conseqently, the hijacker also released the domain and now the domain is again up for sale for the normal price of US 10.00 per annum.


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Tsu Dho Nimh
Local time: 09:29
English
Google is easy to influence with good HTML and content May 5, 2005

Google long ago learned how to neutralize the "link farms" that were a cooperative effort to skew the ratings. I have heard that Google has revised the Page Rank calculation a bit so the content-free, self-referential sites that Selçuk found are not rewarded. Their fatal flaw is that the interlocking pages are all at the same IP address, or close-by addresses, forming a tight knot of links instead of the wide mesh of links that a genuinely popular site would have. This is easy to test for and neutralize or even penalize.

See the starting premises for the Google search engine:
http://www-db.stanford.edu/~backrub/google.html

"[Google] makes heavy use of the structure present in hypertext." "Google makes heavy use of hypertextual information consisting of link structure and link (anchor) text. Google also uses proximity and font information." "Google considers each hit to be one of several different types (title, anchor, URL, plain text large font, plain text small font, ...), each of which has its own type-weight." "Every hitlist includes position, font, and capitalization information."

Empirically, I have found that all it takes is a site that follows good writing principles, and with a simple HTML structure, using the H1, H2, etc. headings that contain words related to the site's purpose. For example, "About Us" is not as good a heading as "Our Experience in English to Turkish Translation". Make sure the text is tightly focused on the topic, concisely written, repeats the key search terms, and do not have multiple topics on a page. Put the important words as close to the beginning of the HTML code as possible. Elaborate layouts lose position to simple ones almost all the time, because the document structure is not as clear.

If you want to attract links legitimately and improve your page rank, use "bait pages" - pages of interesting or useful information about something related to your business, about the location where you do business, etc. For a translator, a few pages on how to hire translators, writing for translation, travel in the area you are familiar with or translate for, maybe some useful phrases in the language ... even recipes for your native cuisine, or some good translations of your native literature.


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Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 17:29
Member (2006)
English to Afrikaans
+ ...
Bait pages = value added content May 5, 2005

Tsu Dho Nimh wrote:
If you want to attract links legitimately and improve your page rank, use "bait pages" - pages of interesting or useful information about something related to your business, about the location where you do business, etc.


The word "bait page" sounds a bit negative or sneaky. But I agree with the principle. If you add related pages, your relatedness rating will increase, and your linkability with increase, which in turn can only benefit your page ranking.

Example 1: I did a Jerome's Day article on the local translation business, and put it on my web site. This article is more likely to be linked to by business directories who normally require payment for a listing, or by academic institutions who have strict policies about linking to commercial sites.

Example 2: For a foreign language library, I created a freelance translator and language tutor page for the language in question. This page is linked back from each translator's page. The library does not offer translation services, but the translator page opens linking possibilities with related fields.

Example 3: I know of an interpreter who has travel tips on his site. Not just a few lines, but regularly updated and truly interesting tips and trivia about his city. He posts the latest tips to the Usenet in forums which are normally closed to commercial messages, and these posts are not unpopular.

If you work in an exotic language, you could even create a links list for your language in which you list fellow-translators, interpreters, language teachers and other touristy information. It might seem silly to mention (or: advertise) your competition, but in search engine optimisation terms it makes perfect sense.


[Edited at 2005-05-06 07:44]


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