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Thread poster: Krzysztof Milewski
DPSI in Scotland

Krzysztof Milewski  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:11
English to Polish
+ ...
Jul 15, 2008

Hi

I wanted to ask you about two things regarding the DPSI in Scotland. Firstly, is the Scottish Law option of the diploma accepted in England? And secondly, which of the two preparatory courses in Glasgow is better - the one at Cardonald College or the one provided by Global Language Services? I would appreciate any advise on these matters.

Thanks

Krzysztof


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Joanna Gałecka  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 16:11
English to Polish
+ ...
Certain opinions Jul 15, 2008

Hello. I don't have the Diploma myself, but I have heard from several fellow interpreters that the only good thing about the course is that you get direct access to materials. Otherwise, it's a waste of time. Some of them work for Global but I can't be sure which course they referred to.

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Miriam300
Local time: 15:11
English to Polish
+ ...
DPSI exam Aug 29, 2008

I would agree with Joanna. I just finished the DPSI course, and must admit that it is very disorganised, and pretty useless. There is no actual teaching going on except to practice you interpreting and translation skills in class.However the teachers cannot really give you feedback on your work, or what the examiners might be looking for.The class is generally in chaos a lot of the time. The exam however is pretty hard, and very stressful, and can lead you to absolutely hate the job of interpreting.

However, I would agree that the materials are somewhat useful. There are no real options or alternatives to getting this qualification except the one that is offered. With distance learning, I would comment that getting pass papers might be useful, but practice practice and practice is the most important thing for passing this exam.Distance learning might not give you this, unless you buddy up with another person. And another thing, the IOL charge you a lot of money just to sit this exam.

I hope this helps you decide for yourself what you want to do.


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Krzysztof Milewski  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:11
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you for both answers Sep 5, 2008

Joanna, the opinions I heard are pretty much the same. The materials are good, but otherwise the course is a waste of time. I just presume that your friends referred to Global Language Services' course, as you said they have been working for this agency. Mirka, can you specify which course have you done?

Regards

Krzysztof


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Miriam300
Local time: 15:11
English to Polish
+ ...
DPSI exam Sep 5, 2008


K.Milewski wrote . Mirka, can you specify which course have you done?



I did the DPSI course - Scottish Law in Glasgow. Don't know anything about the distance learning, but I would imagine that it is pretty difficult to prepare for the exam just through self study. practice is essential, both translating and interpereting.Also the distance course is not all that cheap.


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Krzysztof Milewski  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:11
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Books for study Oct 28, 2008

I am bringing this post back, because I have a few more questions to ask.

I just had my first proper class at Cardonald College. I can't say I was overawed by the amount of material we have done, but it's early days. I will let you know how the course develops.

What I wanted to ask is if anyone knows any good books which I could use during preparations for this exam? I would be grateful for any recommendations. As I am taking the Scottish Law option of the exam, I was also wondering if anyone knows of any source which focuses on the differences between Scottish and English Law. I have a feeling that it might be crucial for the exam.

Any feedback from people doing DPSI courses in Scotland and their impressions would also be very welcome.

Thanks in anticipation.

Krzysztof


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Joanna Gałecka  Identity Verified
Poland
Local time: 16:11
English to Polish
+ ...
DPSI exam Oct 30, 2008

Ah, Cardonald. You'll know Sheila Cameron then?

As for the English vs Scottish law, I think since you're taking the exam in Scot law, the materials provided refer only to the local version of law and you wouldn't be tested on any differences, but I am not entirely sure.

I mostly do medical interpreting but occasionally land a legal job and I usually prepare from materials available online. Sorry I can't be of more help.

And yes, I meant Global Language Services.


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Nagme Yazgin  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:11
English to Turkish
+ ...
Any books you can recommend? Sep 28, 2010

Hi there,

I'm starting this course soon and I was wondering if you could recommend any books that you found particularly useful.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.


Nagme Yazgin


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Krzysztof Milewski  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:11
English to Polish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Books Sep 29, 2010

Hi Nagme

As for books, I must admit that I relied mainly on my dictionaries and online sources. The exam is pretty much vocabulary based and it is good to equip yourself with a specialised monolingual and/or bilingual dictionary. I also built my own glossary of terms as I went along, which really helped. Don't know which option you've chosen, but for legal terms/info it is worth visiting the European Commission's website, HMCS website or the UK Statute Law Database. Also, the translation part of the exam proves to cause many problems to candidates, so it is worth trying to go through as many past papers as you can and have your translations proofread by a qualified translator. This might not be the case as far as you are concerned but it is my tip for less experienced candidates. The book worth investigating here is Mona Baker's "In Other Words: a Coursebook on Translation".

Best of luck!

Krzysztof


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bdmackenzie
Local time: 15:11
DPSI at stevenson Apr 17, 2012

Stevenson in edinburgh - the best option.

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Joao Andre Madeira  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:11
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Answer to some of the points raised Mar 6

Some interesting discussions here spanning over a few years!

I would like to add to some of the points which have been previously mentioned.

- First of all, may I say that I am the current course tutor/curriculum writer for the Global Language Services course. I saw there was some negative feedback regarding this course, but it related to the period before I took over the redesign of the curriculum and course structure around 5 years ago. I would like to think Global's course is, by far, the best one available in Scotland and as a tutor, I have far more professional experience to share than anyone else I know in Scotland at present.

- The exam is NOT difficult, but it IS challenging. This means that any barely competent interpreter with the right contextual knowledge will be able to pass it. If you are prepared, it shouldn't be difficult.

- This is a professional qualification, which means you have to sit a practical examination. You are assessed not on how good you are, but on how you perform on the day. This is an important distinction to make and, for that reason, most courses available will have a very strong practical focus. The curriculum for the course from Global Language Services is at present divided into three areas: Practical Skills, Legal Theory and Knowledge and Interpreting/Translation Practice. Logically, most time is spent on the latter to reinforce the first two through practical work.

- In terms of equivalence, The DPSI is aimed at the Public Services in the UK and the specific areas of the relevant specialisation. So, in other words, the English Law option is not recognised in Scotland, The Northern Irish is not recognised in England and so on. HOWEVER, the nature of public service interpreting provision in the UK means that is not entirely the case. For example: In Scotland provision is made through contracted agencies. In England, mostly through the NRPSI. In order to enter your name on the register you have to have the DPSI in any option or other approved qualifications. That means the DPSI will get you more visibility than many other freelancers working in your area, irrespective of your language. In addition, let's imagine a Polish English Law DPSI holder moves to Stranraer in Scotland. If there is a job at Stranraer Sheriff Court, will the current contracted agency ignore that person and send an interpreter from Glasgow? I don't think so. Having said that, it depends on each person's individual circumstances, background, experience, language and region.

And, at the end of the day, remember this is a people's business.


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