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DPSI - How many of you got it without attending a course
Thread poster: Londonlinguist
Londonlinguist
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
Nov 13, 2008

Hi everyone,
I am currently preparing for the DPSI (Law Option) in Spanish. I plan to sit the examination next June (2009). I enrolled on a preparation course which was subsequently cancelled. In the meantime I couldn't find an alternative (for the days I am available) and now I am worried that I do not stand a chance, especially since the tutor from the cancelled course told me in no uncertain terms that candidates not enrolled on a preparatory course find themselves in a difficult position on the day of the exam.
I know that this tutor has a marketing strategy and clearly wants me and others to enrol on the new course they are offering, but it got me wondering if I really do have any chance of passing this exam at the first attempt. I have read all the articles/posts here on Proz and indeed on other similar websites but haven't found any concrete answers to my query.
How many of you sat the DPSI exam after self-study? I know it is considered to be at first-degree level (according to IOL website) but I feel ready in terms of the quality of my Spanish (1st degree, Masters, Teacher Training with Spanish, a year spent living and working in a Spanish-speaking country).
I am studying parallel texts (Spanish-English law), Legal Glossaries in both languages, and I am going to acquire some past papers. Any other tips re: how to prepare would be most grateful.
Thanks to all who reply.


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Kati Bumbera  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 06:51
Hungarian to English
+ ...
practice matters more but... Nov 13, 2008

The exam is not easy so if you have no prior interpreting experience I'd definitely recommend attending a course. I think I know who the tutor is, I attended his course last year. Not everyone liked his style but the general consensus in my class was that he is a very good teacher. I was quite happy with it all. I passed the exam too.

However, I found that the most important thing in preparing for the exam was not the course itself but practice. The tutor gave as lots and lots of homework (mainly translation) and encouraged us to practice outside the class (with each other or with tapes, podcasts etc.) as often as we could. At the end of the day you don't learn interpreting by sitting in a classroom, you learn by doing it and getting better at it gradually. So whether or not you enrol in a course make sure you practice a lot. If you can manage this and obtain past papers, glossaries etc. you might save on the course fees.

If you want to know more feel free to drop me an email (kati.bumbera@gmail.com) and I'll help if I can.


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Londonlinguist
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for your reply... Nov 16, 2008

Is there anybody else out there? I would be especially interested in those who have done the DPSI in my language pair (Spanish/English) although my question applies to all those who have studied for and subsequently taken the DPSI examination.
I do practise by listening to speeches in Spanish on the tv and interpreting what I have heard, and that is going well.
Any other tips or comments are welcome.
Have a good Sunday!


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Alexandra Goldburt
Local time: 21:51
English to Russian
+ ...
I'm not in UK, but... Nov 17, 2008

...I'm a big believer in self-study (for anything). Well, I'm a homeschooling mom - what else would you expect?

Maybe you need to enlighten those of us who do not live in UK what DPSI is all about. This way, colleagues from all over the world can help you with advice, as we can relate to is through our experiences with the exams we have to take were we live.

I'm currently self-preparing for California Court Interpreting exam. I'm using ACEBO materials for it. Not sure ACEBO is what you need, but check them out and decide for yourself: www.acebo.com.

You can also check this thread on the forum: http://www.proz.com/topic/78329?pg=e

And I totally agree with bumbuiser:

At the end of the day you don't learn interpreting by sitting in a classroom, you learn by doing it and getting better at it gradually. So whether or not you enroll in a course make sure you practice a lot.


So, study with lots of self-discipline and determination, practice a lot, and I'm sure you'll be fine.

Good luck!


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Londonlinguist
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Sure... Nov 17, 2008

Thanks Alexandra for your input - it is really helpful.
The DPSI is the Diploma in Public Service Interpreting. It is a qualification offered by the Chartered Institute of Linguists here in the UK and is set at (approximately) first degree level in terms of difficulty. The qualification is one of the only professional Interpreting exams (of course there are Master's degrees) offered here that I know of, and it is intended to serve as a benchmark of professionalism and quality when interpreting for the Public Services - Health, Law, Local Government.
I have chosen to sit the Law option paper as this is my area of interest and the language combination I have selected is Spanish/English. There are courses offered here that seek to prepare you in some way for the exam but because of other commitments I am unable to attend one and hence my question.
I have started to listen to podcasts and I am interpreting the content. Similarly I have compiled an extensive legal glossary and am in the process of purchasing past papers from the Institute of Linguists so that I can get an idea of the general approach.
Once again I am grateful to you for your help and will look into the Acebo materials. I too advocate self-study and in a sense I am quite looking forward to the challenge ahead!


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Alexandra Goldburt
Local time: 21:51
English to Russian
+ ...
Thanks for info, very interesting Nov 17, 2008

I've been wanting to ask a question about how interpreters obtain credentials in other countries. Thanks to you, now I know about UK!

You might want to check this website, either out of curiosity, just to see what is the process for your colleagues in California, or maybe even find a useful tip or two: http://www.prometric.com/California/CACourtIntPrep.htm

If I can be of any help, feel free to drop me an e-mail.


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Londonlinguist
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Further details re: DPSI Nov 17, 2008

Alexandra,

If you wish to know more about the DPSI I have attached a link below from the Institute of Linguists website:

http://www.iol.org.uk/qualifications/exams_dpsi.asp

Of course there are MA programmes in the UK in Interpreting, but there are not that many. From my research I have gathered that there are indeed considerably more Translation programmes (and there are not that many of them either!)
There is also a specialised EMCI (European Master's in Conference Interpreting) which I would have liked to study but again I simply don't have the time to commit to the course.
Maybe one of our colleagues can shed some light on the EMCI programme so that you have a clearer understanding of the requirements. In the meantime I will have a look at the website you suggested. It is always very interesting to see the types of certification offered across the globe!
And on that note I am off to finish my preparation for tomorrow's French lesson!


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hfp
United States
Local time: 01:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
The indefinite article (the) must be written, Alexandra. Nov 18, 2008

Alexandra Goldburt wrote:

Maybe you need to enlighten those of us who do not live in UK what DPSI is all about.

Alexandra Goldburt wrote:
Thanks to you, now I know about UK!


Alexandra, you are leaving out the definite article (the) when it is necessary. Before the United Kingdom, just like the United States, you must write it. Therefore, your sentences should be written like this:

Maybe you need to enlighten those of us who do not live in the UK on what the DPSI is all about.
Thanks to you, now I know about the UK!

Londonlinguist, in the United States the Federal Court Interpreter Certification Examination is the most similar exam I can think of. I just skimmed the webpage of the DPSI and I think you will have time to prepare yourself for it, assuming your Spanish is fast enough and completely comprehensible. Be optimistic.


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Alexandra Goldburt
Local time: 21:51
English to Russian
+ ...
Thank you for the correction, hfp. Nov 18, 2008

I'll certainly keep it in mind in the future!

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hfp
United States
Local time: 01:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
My mistake: the definite article Nov 19, 2008

"the" is the definite article in English and the indefinite article is "a" or "an". I hope I haven't confused you!

Londlinguist, I just came across The DPSI Written Markers' Reports 2008 on the Chartered Institute of Linguists website and they look really useful. Here's a link:
http://www.iol.org.uk/qualifications/DPSI/WrittenMarkersReportsWeb08.pdf

Once the pdf file is open, search for "Spanish" and you will see mistranslations and tips for words in Spanish and English. One example of a mistranslation is writing "I plead you" or "I beg you" in a formal context as a translation for "Les ruego". You can use this translation of mine, though. (I think ).

Les ruego que no fumen en la oficina.
Please do not smoke in the office.

And here's one last thing that caught my attention in the reports.

In English an incorrect translation for "denegar la petición" is "to deny the petition" whereas "to refuse the request" is a valid translation.

Anyway, you can see more of this sort of thing in the reports at that link.

[Edited at 2008-11-19 19:45 GMT]


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Aymeric de Poyen Bellisle  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 05:51
English to French
+ ...
Just so you know... Nov 20, 2008

hfp wrote:

"the" is the definite article in English and the indefinite article is "a" or "an". I hope I haven't confused you!

Knowing when to use "the" and when not to use it is a very tricky issue for non-native speakers, even the best, and it goes far beyond knowing the difference between 'the' and 'a', which is English 101 and I'm sure Alexandra knows it!


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hfp
United States
Local time: 01:51
Spanish to English
+ ...
excellent point Nov 21, 2008

Aymeric de Poyen Bellisle wrote:

hfp wrote:

"the" is the definite article in English and the indefinite article is "a" or "an". I hope I haven't confused you!

Knowing when to use "the" and when not to use it is a very tricky issue for non-native speakers, even the best, and it goes far beyond knowing the difference between 'the' and 'a', which is English 101 and I'm sure Alexandra knows it!


You have an impressive résumé, Aymeric, and you are right about the article. I imagine knowing when to use "the" is hard for a non-native speaker to comprehend, especially considering that I myself make mistakes in Spanish in this regard.


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Imlaufova
Czech to English
I don't think that THE before UK in forums really matters Nov 28, 2008

Why talk like a book in forums?
Of course sometimes THE is important even in forums, but surely not before UK and USA etc.


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Agnieszka Moczynska  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:51
English to Polish
+ ...
Practice with someone who speaks both languages Jan 29, 2009

Hi,

I passed the exam following a year long preparatory course (decided to go on a course despite having BA in English and 6 yrs experience as a translator at that time) but can give you some tips.

1. Get as many papers from previous years as you can. I think you can purchase them from IoL via their website.

2. Practice all parts of the exam: written translation (both ways), sight translation, consecutive and simultaneous.

3. Let me know where are you based

Good Luck

Agnieszka

PS: Please forget about comments on my "the" and "a" - I am not a native speaker and as such not allowed to write in English


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WeeNatalya
Azerbaijani to English
Questions regarding DPSI Aug 1, 2009

Hi
Could anyone help me plase with advise on DPSI
Im planning to take an exsam next year do u know if i have to sit one exsam each year just cant understand what is this 5 years thing is about
Do u know when shopuld i register for the next year one
Thank you
Russian English


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