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Using the formal 'you' while interpreting
Thread poster: Sara Senft

Sara Senft  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:03
Spanish to English
+ ...
Nov 14, 2008

When I interpret, I use the formal case of 'you.' I'm better off using this case, right?

Personally, I don't like using 'tu' (you, informal in Spanish) when interpreting. That seems too much like devaluing or disrespect.


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Heidi C  Identity Verified
Local time: 13:03
English to Spanish
+ ...
Usted Nov 14, 2008

You should always use "usted", unless asked to use "tú".

And usually, they will address you in the formal, as "usted", so it would be awful to use the informal form while you are being adressed formally...

You are in a formal situation and should use formal address...


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thescarid
Local time: 19:03
French to English
+ ...
But be sure of the audience Nov 14, 2008

When you are translating you should also be aware of the relationships of the persons you are translating for. It is true you are in a professional situation, but it is worth considering the position of those for whom you are interpreting. Cheers

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Wil Hardman  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:03
Spanish to English
+ ...
I was taught to use usted. Nov 14, 2008

When I did a business interpreting course during my diploma they always taught me to use the formal- but when learning to speak Spanish beforehand I had always used the informal. This caused me a lot of problems - I was always switching back to informal without realising it. I worked on this and when it came to exam I was going really well until, right at the end, I slipped up and used 'tu'! They marked me down really severly for it giving me just 50% (the lowest pass grade), which I thought was unfair because IMO the ability to communicate is the most important thing. However, my teachers attached a lot of importance to it.

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Sara Senft  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:03
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I thought so Nov 14, 2008

That's what I thought. Thank you for the confirmation.


Heidi C wrote:

You should always use "usted", unless asked to use "tú".

And usually, they will address you in the formal, as "usted", so it would be awful to use the informal form while you are being adressed formally...

You are in a formal situation and should use formal address...


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Javier Wasserzug  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:03
English to Spanish
+ ...
many situations Nov 14, 2008

Just to add a little colour to the topic:

In Argentina, some people could get offended if you use “USTED”.

Mostly with women, they could consider you are treating them as old since in Argentina, “usted” is only used in extremely formal cases (a judge, the president) or, with older people.


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xxxwonita
China
Local time: 14:03
Usted puede Nov 14, 2008

siempre "say you to me".

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