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Any Westminster graduates? (former Polytechnic of Central London )
Thread poster: NataliaElo

NataliaElo  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:11
Member (2004)
English to Russian
+ ...
Sep 22, 2004

I would be very grateful to those who could tell me about the Postgraduate Diploma course in Conference Interpreting Techniques at the University of Westminster.

Is it worth doing? Does it improve career opportunities? Could one indeed become a simultaneous interpreter after the course? Whom they accept as a student?

Any information is welcomed!

Regards
Natalia


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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:11
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
University of Westminster Sep 23, 2004

Hello Natalia,

I'm sure you've already checked the postgraduate interpreting section of Westminster's website, but just in case, they give some names, addresses and e-mail addresses for a course leader for (one of) the interpreting courses and for the postgraduate admissions officer, at: http://www.wmin.ac.uk/sshl/new/ddal/european_masters_in_conference_i%204.htm
I guess that would be a good way of asking what kind of students they accept.

I'm sorry I can't help with the other questions, not having studied there. There's an entry in the Translation Organizations database (Main Menu =- Community =- Translation Organizations) at: http://www.proz.com/translator_associations/323?country_code=&group_type=all in case there's any information there of any use, although as I said, I'm sure you've already seen Westminster's own website. (At least 5 members report having qualifications from Westminster, although they aren't necessarily postgraduate interp. qualifications)

Good luck
Giuli


[Edited at 2004-09-23 22:09]


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NataliaElo  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:11
Member (2004)
English to Russian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thank you! Sep 24, 2004

Dear Giuli,

Yes, you were right, I've read both the website and the prospectus so many times, that I nearly know them by heart. Still I have some questions. For example, in the prospectus (paper form) is stated as a requirement: applicants should have two or three passive languages. They do not say, what languages in particular they mean. On the website, however, I found information that basically these should be English and French in addition to the mother tongue of the applicant.

Well, my French is so lousy, that I don't even dare to mention it anywhere. I can only understand simple written text.

I do have though at least two passive languages, Finnish and English, the former one being stronger that the latter one. But what is a market for Finnish, especially taking account of the fact I live nowadays in Berlin.

I'm working hard to learn German of course, but it will take a long time before I will be able to interpret. So I don't know what should I do now: urgently start to brush up my French (which is not so easy and cost money, time and nerves) or just try to apply there next spring with what I have now?

(At least 5 members report having qualifications from Westminster, although they aren't necessarily postgraduate interp. qualifications)
Thank you! This is very valuable piece of information.

Best regards
Natalia


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Paola Dentifrigi  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 09:11
Member (2003)
English to Italian
+ ...
It's though, but great! Sep 26, 2004

Hi, I graduated in May. It's not a piece of cake
and of course you cannot expect to start working immediately as a conference interpreter. But I guess without one of these courses you cannot interpret in conferences (e.g. simultaneous interpreting).
As far as concern your combination, you should just write to the course leader. Usually there must be at least 3 As, in your case three people with Russian A, but I guess there are exceptions too, as my friend was the only Polish A last year.
Since you have Finnish as well, why don't you check the Master offered in Turku?
Sorry for writing in a haste, but I'm in Poland in an Internet cafe.

Cheers
Paola


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NataliaElo  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 09:11
Member (2004)
English to Russian
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
My mother tongue is Russian Sep 26, 2004

Dear Paola,

Thank you for your reply! I couldn't imagine to meet here so recent graduate.

Since you have Finnish as well, why don't you check the Master offered in Turku?


I talked to the course leader Johanna don't-remember-her-surname already back in 2000 at the closing event of the project, where I studied (for Russian interpreters). That's what she said: "If your mother tongue is not one of the official languages of the EU, we will not even invite you for the entry tests."


Sorry for writing in a haste, but I'm in Poland in an Internet cafe.

Have a nice time there!


Natalia


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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:11
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
Westminster Interpreting Oct 1, 2004

Natalia Elo wrote:

Dear Paola,

Thank you for your reply! I couldn't imagine to meet here so recent graduate.

Since you have Finnish as well, why don't you check the Master offered in Turku?


I talked to the course leader Johanna don't-remember-her-surname already back in 2000 at the closing event of the project, where I studied (for Russian interpreters). That's what she said: "If your mother tongue is not one of the official languages of the EU, we will not even invite you for the entry tests."


Sorry for writing in a haste, but I'm in Poland in an Internet cafe.

Have a nice time there!


Natalia



The list of languages that CIT courses theoretically cater for is given at: http://www.wmin.ac.uk/sshl/new/ddal/CTI%20Language%20Combinations.htm

but my information is that this is a list dependant on the demand from year to year - there have to be enough people on the course in a year, for a language, for that language to be offered.
Apparently native Russian isn't being offered as an option this year for the diploma/MA conference interp. - whether it would be offered in future years would be according to demand. The same with Finnish, although it would be available less often, because demand for students to be on the course is much less frequent. From that point of view the Turku course seems an option.

Apparently if you went on the course in a future year, with native/'A' Russian, and Finnish wasn't available, then (in your case, out the languages that you mention) either English would have to be offered as a 'B' (the 'bilingual' option) or a second passive/'C' language would need to be offered (eg: French or German).

Enguiries to course leader Ingebjorg Smallwood (contact details in http://www.prospects.ac.uk/servlets/vcsc.VcscServlet?idno=969&mode=Browse&surveyt=LT&method=View_Main )

[Edited at 2004-10-05 23:57]


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EdithK  Identity Verified
Switzerland
Local time: 09:11
Member
Gaelic to German
+ ...
Hi Oct 11, 2004

I'm one of these but many moons ago. It's worth it.

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