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Requirements for interpreters in France
Thread poster: Sophie Fronty
Sophie Fronty
Local time: 08:07
Spanish to French
+ ...
Dec 18, 2007

Is it possible to be an interpreter without a specific diploma in it ? (like it is used to be for translators)

Thank you for your anwer,

Sophie


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EmmanuelleAnne  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 08:07
English to French
+ ...
Yes and No Dec 20, 2007

Sophie Fronty wrote:

Is it possible to be an interpreter without a specific diploma in it ? (like it is used to be for translators)

Thank you for your anwer,

Sophie


Yes and No. I have a diploma in Conference Intepreting but most of my colleagues here (who are in their 50's, I just turned 30) don't. Still, they are excellent interpreters and I learnt (and keep learning!) a lot from them when I started working. To be honest, most of my colleagues here don't really believe in "diplomas". Now, other agencies may prefer someone with a diploma but I can tell you, it does not always do the trick! Experience is what really matters. However, without a diploma I don't think I would have had the confidence to start working as an interpreter. Moreover when my colleagues started in the business, there were very few available courses in Conference Interpreting. Therefore I think we are now more likely to encounter interpreters with official degrees. The degree gives you a background and confidence but it is pretty much like driving: after passing your driving licence, you almost can't drive, you just have the basis! It's through your driving experience that you will become a "driver". I'd say it's pretty much the same with interpreting! I hope I am being clear because I always find it a bit confusing answering that question! Have a lovely day and Happy Xmas!

[Edited at 2007-12-20 10:28]


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Williamson  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:07
Flemish to English
+ ...
Basic training Dec 20, 2007

If you do not want to go flat on your face, it is better to try to get accepted into a good interpreter training. In France there is ESIT and its catholic and more expensive counterpart ISIT. In Strassbourg, you have the institut Marc Bloch. In Belgium, you have three schools with French as target-language.
Learning by doing: yes, but with a basic training. Better to graduate in a 10 months programme and learn by doing/get paid for it asap. After all there is the 250 days/500 days rule to be considered as a real pro at the E.U. At the E.U., a major (freelance) employer of interpreters (see scic-website) all interpreter training is considered equal, whether you come from ESIT or ISTI-Brussels, you have to pass their accreditation tests.

[Edited at 2007-12-20 16:54]


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