How does "this is a good question" work?
Thread poster: cello

cello  Identity Verified
Local time: 16:53
Spanish to English
+ ...
Sep 22, 2005

I've just voted for a question to be a "good question", but I'm not sure if this has been registered and the "good question" button has disappeared.

When we vote for re-classification of questions as Pro/non pro there is (was?) a box that appears showing that others had voted, so my question is: should a similar thing happen with the "good question" option?

Also; I'd like to suggest to the others that have answered/commented on the question in question, http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1143427, that they vote for it to be considered "good" since there are a couple of comments from others that it is a "difficult" question. Where is it most appropriate to make this suggestion? (in a comment to the asker, or in the peer comments?)

Maybe I've missed something with all the changes that have happened over the summer.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

JaneTranslates  Identity Verified
Puerto Rico
Local time: 10:53
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Define "good question," please Sep 22, 2005

I'm going to be watching this forum, because I don't understand this feature at all. What constitutes a "good question"? Unlike some ProZers, I sympathize with the askers. What seems like a simple (or even "dumb") question to an experienced pro may represent a real struggle for someone at an earlier stage, or even a "glitch" or gap in an experienced translator's knowledge. (Or a temporary case of translator's block!) Answers that can "easily be found in a dictionary or the KudoZ glossaries" may still leave doubts in an asker's mind in a given context.

Why are we asked to label some questions as "good questions," thus tacitly designating the others as "bad questions"?

[Edited at 2005-09-22 16:10]

[Edited at 2005-09-22 16:11]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 08:53
French to English
+ ...
it's irrelevant Sep 23, 2005

I have not used that feature and I don't plan to.
Why would anyone care if it's a good question or not?

If a translator needs help doing a job, then it's a pertinent question, a necessary question, and that is good enough for me.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Nikki Graham  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:53
Member (2003)
Spanish to English
My sentiments exactly Sep 23, 2005

JaneTranslates wrote:

Why are we asked to label some questions as "good questions," thus tacitly designating the others as "bad questions"?


Why indeed? It makes no sense to me and I'm glad that I haven't seen it used very much.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jessica Klingberg  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 10:53
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
I agree Sep 23, 2005

Unless someone can convince me to the contrary, I think this feature is pointless since it is extremely subjective. A good question for one person may not be a good question for another person. Case in point, a couple of days ago I submitted a chemistry term to KudoZ for help. This turned out to be a basic chemistry term, as it turns out, but it was a very important (good?) question to me as I know very little of Chemistry and wanted to get my translation right!

Direct link Reply with quote
 

moken  Identity Verified
Local time: 15:53
English to Spanish
+ ...
Are creatures from outer space good or bad? Sep 24, 2005

Hi Cello,

Thanks for posting this forum. I have asked this same question on the "comprehensive kudoz update forum twice' but nobody has been able to respond.

Of course, considering an answer to be 'interesting' is a matter of opinion and tremedously subjective. However, I don't agree that this is tacitly qualifying others as bad. That's like saying colours don't exist, that there is only black or white.

Before condemning this as a good or bad feature, I think we should know what it's for. Once we know it's purspose, we might think it's not so bad after all and we could consider asking ProZ to change the wording if we don't like it.

To give an example of possible use:

It's impossible to follow Kudoz 24-7, so we all miss a large number of the questions posted. Very often, we have to spend long stretches of time without visiting Kudoz regularly due to our workload. Irrelevant of areas of expertise, translators could be interested in reviewing some of the 'most interesting' questions, as part of the learning process and even as a subject for debate.

So let's say for example, that Kudoz published a monthly ranking of 'most interesting questions' (by language pairs preferably). It might be interesting for some.

However, if this were the approach, the idea would have a serious defect: Only answerers can mark the check-box when for a broader scope of opinion on what's more or less interesting, you'd need input frm anyone visiting the question. Further, I don't see any indication that someone has marked the checkbox when it IS used (I've used the feature a couple of times to try it out).

Before condeming this feature to ostracism, let's hear what it's for. So...

Dear ProZ.com staff,

Whose idea was this? Perhaps this person could give us an explanation on a feature that has left KudoZ users wondering.

Thanks for your time,

Álvaro ))


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Henry Dotterer
Local time: 10:53
SITE FOUNDER
Please use it in a personal way, as a guide for your colleagues Sep 24, 2005

This experimental feature is not to be thought about too much. If you look at a question and think, "good question!", please click the button.

If several people think a question is a "good question!", other members might want to have a look. We highlight questions marked "good question" in the KudoZ lists.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

JaneTranslates  Identity Verified
Puerto Rico
Local time: 10:53
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Thank you, Henry! Sep 24, 2005

Álvaro Blanch wrote:

Before condemning this as a good or bad feature, I think we should know what it's for. Once we know its purpose, we might think it's not so bad after all and we could consider asking ProZ to change the wording if we don't like it.



I was hoping Henry, or someone from the ProZ staff, would read this forum and explain the reasoning behind and functioning of the feature. Thank you, Henry!

Álvaro, my friend, if you re-read the posts I don't think you'll find anyone--not me, at least!--"condemning" the feature. We were withholding judgment, waiting for an explanation. I can't imagine using the feature myself; what's "interesting" to me may not be to someone else. I like to scan the KudoZ list and click on whatever intrigues me. But if others want this feature, fine! It isn't doing me any harm as it sits there, unused and ignored!

I very much like your suggestion for a change of wording, though. "Interesting" is much better. I disagree with your rejection of the tacit comparison; if the boss at the agency singles out two or three translators and says, "Good work," and doesn't say it to me, I'm paranoid enough to wonder why! ;-D

*Later*: Ah, I see. My apologies, Álvaro. Comments from ProZers, including me, about being willing to admit a feature that others have requested, even if it doesn't suit our needs, were in a different forum, the one about "feature creep (bloatware)" http://www.proz.com/topic/37080. In my post on that forum I referred others to this forum as a possible example of a feature that could be eliminated, *unless someone could explain the rationale for its existence.*

So, my defensiveness was out of place, Álvaro, and I most humbly apologize!

[Edited at 2005-09-24 14:15]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
gad
United States
Local time: 10:53
Member
French to English
I agree and disagree Sep 25, 2005

JaneTranslates wrote:

I'm going to be watching this forum, because I don't understand this feature at all. What constitutes a "good question"? Unlike some ProZers, I sympathize with the askers. What seems like a simple (or even "dumb") question to an experienced pro may represent a real struggle for someone at an earlier stage, or even a "glitch" or gap in an experienced translator's knowledge. (Or a temporary case of translator's block!) Answers that can "easily be found in a dictionary or the KudoZ glossaries" may still leave doubts in an asker's mind in a given context.

Why are we asked to label some questions as "good questions," thus tacitly designating the others as "bad questions"?

[Edited at 2005-09-22 16:10]

[Edited at 2005-09-22 16:11]


I wholeheartedly agree with your first paragraph, but disagree with your second paragraph, in that I don't think that a POSTIIVE thing, labelling questions as "good questions", necessarily should be taken as a NEGATIVE thing - it doesn't necessarily mean the others are "bad questions". I thought it was kind of nice when someone labelled one of my questions as a "good question", but I haven't particularly felt that anyone had nerve NOT doing that for my other questions.

But regarding your first paragraph, I think one thing that needs to be specifically defined is Pro vs. Non-Pro. I would say that hardly any questions are actually Non-Pro, though some people THINK they are. Sometimes a term that you look up in a dictionary gives a definition that just can't be used in a certain context - and I have quite a translation library here, and also I make use of online tools, so by the time I post a KudoZ question, having someone label it as "Non-Pro" for whatever reason, is a little annoying, and seems rathe nervy as well. Particuarly if the person's answer (if they even GIVE one) may even end up being wrong. If it requires that much thought, in my mind it is no longer "Non-Pro". That kind of goes along with what you said in your first paragraph, so I hope you don't mind me mentioning it here.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
gad
United States
Local time: 10:53
Member
French to English
I kind of like this feature Sep 25, 2005

I think it's nice - it certainly should be taken ONLY in a positive way, and not in a negative way at all. I take it to mean that it's an intersting question, but that is not to say that the other questions are NOT interesting. It's just that certain questions are rather unique in their terminology. I don't get why anyone would have a problem with something that is GOOD.

JMO.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

JaneTranslates  Identity Verified
Puerto Rico
Local time: 10:53
Member (2005)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Toss out "pro v. nonpro" too! Sep 25, 2005

gad wrote:
But regarding your first paragraph, I think one thing that needs to be specifically defined is Pro vs. Non-Pro.


I agree fully! I may be wrong, but I don't think I've ever voted something "non-pro"; I certainly don't intend to do so in the future, for the very reasons you cite.

No question is hard if you know the answer; any question is hard if you don't.

Maybe I'm just touchier than other people, but I really don't see a need to make subjective hierarchical designations regarding the questions people submit. Pro, non-pro; "good question," "something other than a 'good question'"--what's the difference? Somebody needs help; answer their question if you know the answer, don't if you don't. If you don't think the question is worthy of your attention, skip it. We have ample opportunity in our answers, our agree/neutral/disagree option, and the response to a/n/d, to make any comments we want to make.
(Also "ask asker a question" which many of us have used as a chance to comment more fully.)

If anything, we could keep the "good question" button but change the wording to "interesting question," as Álvaro suggested and as gad's post used it.

All of this, of course, is JMO; I can go along with whatever the majority wants. Anyway, translators tend to be pretty independent-minded people, don't we? Or does anyone expect us all to agree on anything???!!! ;-D


Direct link Reply with quote
 
gad
United States
Local time: 10:53
Member
French to English
Good idea, JaneTranslates Sep 26, 2005

JaneTranslates wrote:

I may be wrong, but I don't think I've ever voted something "non-pro"; I certainly don't intend to do so in the future, for the very reasons you cite.

No question is hard if you know the answer; any question is hard if you don't.

Maybe I'm just touchier than other people, but I really don't see a need to make subjective hierarchical designations regarding the questions people submit. Pro, non-pro; "good question," "something other than a 'good question'"--what's the difference? Somebody needs help; answer their question if you know the answer, don't if you don't. If you don't think the question is worthy of your attention, skip it. We have ample opportunity in our answers, our agree/neutral/disagree option, and the response to a/n/d, to make any comments we want to make.
(Also "ask asker a question" which many of us have used as a chance to comment more fully.)

If anything, we could keep the "good question" button but change the wording to "interesting question," as Álvaro suggested and as gad's post used it.


I think that is probably a good idea, to just get rid of it. I hadn't thought of that before as I was just asking for clarification on when it should be used, but I would be all for getting rid of it.


Direct link Reply with quote
 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

How does "this is a good question" work?

Advanced search






Protemos translation business management system
Create your account in minutes, and start working! 3-month trial for agencies, and free for freelancers!

The system lets you keep client/vendor database, with contacts and rates, manage projects and assign jobs to vendors, issue invoices, track payments, store and manage project files, generate business reports on turnover profit per client/manager etc.

More info »
CafeTran Espresso
You've never met a CAT tool this clever!

Translate faster & easier, using a sophisticated CAT tool built by a translator / developer. Accept jobs from clients who use SDL Trados, MemoQ, Wordfast & major CAT tools. Download and start using CafeTran Espresso -- for free

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs