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Thread poster: Odette Grille

Odette Grille  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 17:13
English to French
+ ...
Aug 19, 2003

Circumlocution, which we rarely and shamefully use as proz. is well illustrated in the story (after the French intro.)
outil de traduction auquel le traducteur proz. se résigne parfois honteusement, la périphrase me fait penser à cette histoire qui me semble l'illustrer parfaitement :

Last year authorities in Montana discovered that a hermit had been living in an old Forest Service cabin, and they were concerned about his well being. They decided to send up a team of experts from different fields to analyze his living arrangements, and to make sure that he was okay.

First they decided on a Psychologist, to make sure that the man was mentally handling his isolation. Next, they decided on an Engineer, to make sure that the cabin is still structurally sound and safe. Finally, they decided on a Theological professor from the university, to make sure that the man's spiritual needs were being fulfilled.

The team made it's way up the treacherous terrain in three days, but they were truly exhausted. Finally, on the evening of the third day, they spotted the cabin. From the outside, it appeared all was well. The area around the cabin was clean, the ground almost appearing as though it had been swept often. There was smoke coming from the stove pipe chimney, and the door was slightly ajar. Cautiously, they walked inside.

Inside the cabin everything appeared neat and tidy. The only thing that stood out, and this immediately caught the attention of all three men, was that the stove was suspended 18 inches off of the floor by about a hundred wires attached to the ceiling. The pattern of the wires was very intricate, cutting this way and that, and it appeared to be a very sturdy arrangement.

At first, all three men did not know what to make of the arrangement. Finally with a loud, "Oh yes!" the Psychologist spoke. "This very clearly explains this man's desire to return to the womb. He has arranged the stove so that he can crawl underneath to, once again, feel the warmth of the womb."

"Nonsense!" exclaimed the Engineer. "This serves a very clear and definite thermodynamic purpose. He has lifted the stove so as to reduce the zone which the heat has to permeate, allowing the cold air to remain within the cabin, locking the heat in place. This man is a genius."

The Theological Professor stayed quiet a moment longer, but then he too spoke. "I hate to disappoint you both, but I believe you are both wrong. The placement of fire on raised altars has always been a significant emblem of the existence of faith and religion in cultures of the past and present. It would clearly be that this man has created an altar for whatever faith he has clung onto or, worse yet, created."

At this, the three men argued until there was a loud knock at the door, and the three men turned to see that the hermit had returned to his home. Immediately the three men approached him and demanded to know the significance of the placement of the stove.

The hermit stared at the three men long enough to hush them up, and then he spoke.

"Simple...had to fix stove pipe...plenty of wire...not enough stove pipe!"



Hey ! I wrote as proz (not .com) (it appears as proz.com ; should then be followed with members or smthg...) Who changed it ? The machine ?



[Edited at 2003-08-22 22:50]

[Edited at 2003-08-22 22:51]


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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:13
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
Thanks for making me laugh for so much Aug 21, 2003

odette Grille-Burgo wrote:
Circumlocution, which we rarely....

The hermit stared at the three men long enough to hush them up, and then he spoke.....


and for giving me something to remember when I can't see the woods for the trees
Giuli


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Odette Grille  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 17:13
English to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
How do you pronounce your name ? (Yes I can read phonetic signs) Aug 22, 2003

Giuli[giving me something/quote] I'm always happy when someone laughs.

[Edited at 2003-08-22 22:55]


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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:13
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
It is........ Aug 27, 2003

Odette Grille-Burgo wrote:

How do you pronounce your name ?
Giuli[giving me something/quote] I'm always happy when someone laughs.

[Edited at 2003-08-22 22:55]


Hello Odette,

How kind to ask
It's pronounced quite like English Canadian:
"K-vreev-eesh-veel-ee"

Fortunately it doesn't contain any of the unusual, difficult (for non Georgian non-babies) Georgian sounds, which I'm not sure whether or not (even) the international phonetic alphabet covers.
UK English speakers are sometimes a bit intimidated by Georgian spelling (transliterated into English, that is) because there are often lots of consonants close together (very useful for Scrabble?), but really I think it just means that where English words use a vowel and a consonant to "spell" a sound, Georgian "thinks" it's logical to have one letter to represent a sound (which is transliterated directly to it's one equivalent latin/english letter) - so the Georgian idea of Eng."Cup" might be "Cp" (in Georgian letters) , because that is how "C" and "P" are pronounced, in a way.....
Apart from some of the sounds being a bit tricky for non-Georgians, the good news is that there are 33 letters in the alphabet - and one sound for each letter, with no capitals, so it's all very logical at least.......:-)

Best wishes
Giuli

[Edited at 2003-08-27 10:15]

[Edited at 2003-08-27 10:21]


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Odette Grille  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 17:13
English to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Non-baby's answer Aug 27, 2003

[
It\'s pronounced quite like English Canadian:
\"K-vreev-eesh-veel-ee\"

Quite simple indeed !

non Georgian non-babies
It took me a while to understand the joke, here. I was wondering what non-babies were...

Good day to you
Aude


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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:13
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
Ah well, non Georgian babies probably make some Georgian sounds quite well, and then lose the habit Aug 27, 2003

odette Grille-Burgo wrote:

[
It's pronounced quite like English Canadian:
"K-vreev-eesh-veel-ee"

Quite simple indeed !

non Georgian non-babies
It took me a while to understand the joke, here. I was wondering what non-babies were...

Good day to you
Aude


especially if they start speaking English (Welsh and Gaelic babies perhaps keep more of them going ?)


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