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Off topic: liungisitc rscheearch
Thread poster: Chris Hopley

Chris Hopley  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 17:10
German to English
+ ...
Sep 15, 2003

Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.

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Katherine Zei  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 11:10
Italian to English
+ ...
how bizarre Sep 15, 2003

Chris Hopley wrote:

Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht frist and lsat ltteer is at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.


That was cool. It doesn't excuse sloppy spelling though!!
Tnaksh, adn hvea a gdoo dya.
Ktya


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Narasimhan Raghavan  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:40
English to Tamil
+ ...
I suheddr to tihnik waht mess it wuold be Sep 15, 2003

Eevn tpynig scuh msesaegs birngs a haedcahe to me!

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xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 17:10
French to English
+ ...
truth is stranger than fiction Sep 15, 2003

Has to be some truth in what they say becuase even dumb old me understood without the slightest difficulty!

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schmurr  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:10
Italian to German
+ ...
I too realized the "Whole Word method" is right Sep 15, 2003

and the "Single letter method" is wrong when I learnt Russian: I was able to read known words fluently, but as soon as I stumbled on an unknown one, I had to decipher letter by letter very slowly.

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xxxLinguaText
English to Chinese
+ ...
Yeah, that's new practice Sep 15, 2003

Happy to read and find.

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Henk Peelen  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 17:10
Member (2002)
German to Dutch
+ ...
? Sep 15, 2003

Are you srue you d'ndit fgreot to say tihs cnutos olny for one, two and terhe lteetr wdros?

[Edited at 2003-09-15 14:16]


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Kirill Semenov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 18:10
Member (2004)
English to Russian
+ ...
Since Russian it is ;-) Sep 15, 2003

Martin Schmurr wrote:
and the "Single letter method" is wrong when I learnt Russian: I was able to read known words fluently, but as soon as I stumbled on an unknown one, I had to decipher letter by letter very slowly.


This is how Russian works: changing any letter's position, you get another word and new meaning, heh.

[Edited at 2003-09-15 13:34]


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Silvina Beatriz Codina  Identity Verified
Argentina
Local time: 13:10
Member (2002)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Maybe Sep 15, 2003

This reminds me of these studies about how many days a human being can endure without eating, drinking or sleeping, or living in a cave without light. They usually find humans can do it for longer than most people expect, but it is very uncomfortable living.

So, in principle it may be right, but I think most of us would prefer letters to stay put.

[Edited at 2003-09-15 17:31]


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Claudia Alvis  Identity Verified
Peru
Local time: 11:10
Partial member
Spanish
+ ...
Here's an interesting experiment Sep 15, 2003

I found this on the internet. It's got to do with it.

Claudia

HOW SMART ARE YOU?

Read this sentence:

FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE-
SULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTIF-
IC STUDY COMBINED WITH THE
EXPERIENCE OF YEARS.

Now count aloud the F's in that sentence. Count them ONLY ONCE.

Do not go back and count them again.


===

Scroll down for the answer

















===

There are six F's in the sentence.

One of the average intelligence finds three of them.

If you spotted four, you're above average. If you got five, you can turn up your nose at most anybody.

If you caught six, you are a genius!

There is no catch. Most people forget the OFs. The human brain tends to see them as "Vs" instead of "Fs."



Here is the same text, but we highlighted the F's for your review!

FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE-
SULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTIF-
IC STUDY COMBINED WITH THE
EXPERIENCE OF YEARS.


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Narasimhan Raghavan  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:40
English to Tamil
+ ...
How about another expriment? Sep 16, 2003

A man took a cat and trained it to jump on command. Then he removed its one leg and commanded it. It jumped. Then he removed the second leg and commanded. It jumped. On removing the third leg too it jumped. But on removing the fourth leg it stayed put. The experimenter drew this conclusion: If you remove all its legs, a cat becomes deaf!

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Attila Piróth  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 17:10
Member
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Amusing Sep 16, 2003

Caliaa wrote:

Now count aloud the F's in that sentence.


There is no catch. Most people forget the OFs. The human brain tends to see them as "Vs" instead of "Fs."



Well, if you count the f's when reading the sentence ALOUD, there are only three of them.

OF is pronounced as [@v], and not [@f] or [of] - where @ stands for the sound schwa.

However, it is really amusing.

Attila


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Romuald Pawlikowski  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:10
Member (2004)
English to Polish
+ ...
OF pronunciation Sep 16, 2003

Attila Piroth wrote:

Well, if you count the f's when reading the sentence ALOUD, there are only three of them.

OF is pronounced as [@v], and not [@f] or [of] - where @ stands for the sound schwa.

However, it is really amusing.

Attila


Well, it is not really that OF is always pronounced [@v], try for example 'of course'.



Romuald


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Attila Piróth  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 17:10
Member
English to Hungarian
+ ...
Assimilation Sep 16, 2003

I suppose this line is getting a bit too far afield from the original posting.


Romuald Pawlikowski wrote:

Well, it is not really that OF is always pronounced [@v], try for example 'of course'.



Romuald


You are right, of couse, of course [@f "kO:s || "kO:rs] is a very good example of assimilation. A simple one, as the sounds v and f are very similar (voiced and voiceless labiodanetal fricative).

Assimilation is very common, and is not indicated separately in dictionaries.
Who would go as far as to say that
ten should be transcribed as [tem],
as in "ten men [ten "men]?

In the original text,


FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE-
SULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTIF-
IC STUDY COMBINED WITH THE
EXPERIENCE OF YEARS.


of in OF YEARS is clearly pronounced as [@v], however, in OF SCIENTIFIC it sounds more like [@f]! So, I should have counted 4 instead of 3!

Attila


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vladex  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:10
Polish
+ ...
what's the problem? Sep 17, 2003

Attila Piroth wrote:

IIn the original text,

of in OF YEARS is clearly pronounced as [@v], however, in OF SCIENTIFIC it sounds more like [@f]! So, I should have counted 4 instead of 3!

Attila


But I don't get the point. You were to count letters "f" not sounds [f]. If a word like 'Philadelphia' occured in the text, would you count two "f"s more?
(BTW, I don't even try to start discussion whether [f] palatalized by [i] is a different sound or phoneme )


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