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Off topic: An example of bureaucracy gone mad
Thread poster: Lesley Clarke

Lesley Clarke  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 17:08
Spanish to English
Jun 14, 2004

As with Rowan, I have to share this. I've just finished the translation of a degree certificate that, on was accompanied by a notarial certificate stating that the signatures of the people who signed the degree certificate are authentic. Fine.
But then this is followed by a certificate from a member of the state government to confirm that the notary's signature is his and he is a notary. Not content with this there is another certificate testifying to the validity of that person's signature and legitimacy. And yet another for the last person.

Is this a record? And what if the last person was lying?


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Harry Bornemann  Identity Verified
Mexico
English to German
+ ...
safe, safer, impossible Jun 14, 2004

Maybe you should offer your client to get certificates for your translation, the proofreader, etc., etc., etc..



[Edited at 2004-06-14 15:34]


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Marianela Melleda  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 20:08
English to Spanish
+ ...
Not so odd Jun 14, 2004

As far as I know, this is the way in which a degree obtained in one country can be validated in another country, (besides of course all the checking of the subjects studied, etc.). If this is the case, the degree probably had the stamp of the Ministry of Foregin Affairs, as final witness.

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Narasimhan Raghavan  Identity Verified
Local time: 04:38
English to Tamil
+ ...
There is a method to the bureaucracy's madness Jun 14, 2004

Nowadays the pensioners in India get their pensions credited to their bank accounts and all the pensioner has to regularly do is to produce a life certificate once a year to the effect that he is still alive. But in the olden days a pensioner had to go to the treasury to get his pension every month and had to provide the life certificate every time.
This pensioner had to go out of station for a certain month, say January. He went to the treasury in the month of February, produced the life certificate and requested the pension for January as well as February. Whereupon the clerk wanted him to produce life certificate for January as well. In other words, it is not enough to show that you are alive now. You should also prove that you were alive the previous month!
Regards,
N.Raghavan

[Edited at 2004-06-14 21:39]


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Lesley Clarke  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 17:08
Spanish to English
TOPIC STARTER
that's great Narasimhan Jun 14, 2004

I always enjoy your contributions and this is no exception. And Harry I think your idea is a good one. I must admit as a translator the more bureaucracy like that the better.
Lesley


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translatol
Local time: 00:08
Spanish to English
+ ...
The stamp Jun 14, 2004

Marianela Melleda wrote:

As far as I know, this is the way in which a degree obtained in one country can be validated in another country, (besides of course all the checking of the subjects studied, etc.). If this is the case, the degree probably had the stamp of the Ministry of Foregin Affairs, as final witness.

Ah yes, the stamp. Not only must there be a signature, there must be a stamp.


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Yongmei Liu  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:08
English to Chinese
+ ...
Something called "apostille" might be involved Jun 15, 2004

It's a form of state certification in the U.S., done by the office of the Secretary of State of each state. I am not sure what it is called at the federal level.

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Jaakko
Local time: 02:08
English to Finnish
+ ...
US Army Dec 10, 2004

I was living in the US and had a student visa. The US Army wanted me to register and I sent them copies of the papers proving that I am foreign born and my visa was only for a limited time. They send me the same registration papers again. I sent them the same papers again... and thought that this was going to last as long as I'd stay there but fortunately someone made the decision to give up...

Jaakko


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Berni Armstrong  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:08
Member
English
+ ...
"Apostilles" : epistles requiring the patience of an apostle! Dec 23, 2004

When I was attempting to convalidate my degrees in Spain (never achieved thanks to too many bureaucratic barriers) I had to go to a Notary Public in London, before going on to the Home Office for the "Apostille of the Hague". That day Boris Becker had just lost at Wimbledon (shows you how long ago this was ), but had still gone home with a tidy sum. The notary signed my papers with a flourish and I was charged sixty pounds. "My Goodness," I quipped, "...sixty Pounds for two signatures. Second for second you must get paid better than Boris Becker!" The notary looked down at me over his half moon spectacles and, smiling, replied "Yes, but I always win!"

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