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Off topic: Unintentional neologisms
Thread poster: Tony M

Tony M  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 11:00
Member
French to English
+ ...
Jul 25, 2005

Well, I'm quite surprised not to have found a thread on this topic, but perhaps I'm the only one who makes so many typing errors! I know that Dusty is notorious on KudoZ for thinking faster than he can type...

Anyway, I often find that the typos I make actually make a new rod, sometimes funny. One of my classics was when I complained in a letter to a friend that since coming to live in the country, I was continually being woken too early by the 'dawn rochus' [raucous]

Just today, when answering a question, I invented 'consnortium' --- definition: a group of people who get together to buy coke.

Even the Word spell-checker has a sense of humour; when it came across a term I'd used 'all-gay team', it blithely and without blushing suggested that I'd actually meant to say 'all-American team'

And of course one of my more lucrative activities is 'poof-reading' --- MUCH more interesting than tea-leaves or palms. Mind you, the difficulty for me is that I'm rather poorly-placed for doing anything OTHER than 'poof-reading'.

I think I take after my sister; we always said she was very wily on the linguistic front.


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Kirill Semenov  Identity Verified
Ukraine
Local time: 12:00
Member (2004)
English to Russian
+ ...
Nice topic :) Jul 25, 2005

Hello Dusty,

We have a topic close to this one in Russian forum, under the title "Freudian typos". Indeed, most of the typos we see in kudoZ questions and answers, are really funny, so the good old Freud would be excited when reading them.


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Kevin Kelly  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:00
Member (2005)
Russian to English
+ ...
Copyright that word! Jul 25, 2005

Dusty, "consnortium" is one of the best I've ever heard in that category. I'm sure its use will spread like wildfire. You should see to it that it is always attributed to you.

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writeaway  Identity Verified

Local time: 11:00
Partial member (2003)
French to English
+ ...
Untied States of America Jul 25, 2005

is one I have to be very careful of-spell check sees no prob with this.
:-[


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Andy Watkinson
Spain
Local time: 11:00
Member
Catalan to English
+ ...
Or...... Jul 25, 2005

writeaway wrote:

is one I have to be very careful of-spell check sees no prob with this.
:-[



.....the fact that the current ratio (of something) in Catalonia has been determined by analysts can easily be "spell-checkered" into:

"Annalists have detriment the currant ratio in Catatonia."


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Tony M  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 11:00
Member
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks for the examples... Jul 25, 2005

Great examples, gals and guys! I'm still laughing. Yes, Kirill, as you say, some of mine seem to be more Freudian than I like --- as when I suggested applying for an 'overdaft'. A delightful one that Word let slip through (though fortunately only in private correspondecne!) was the time I said I thought I ought to "go down in the anals of history" --- I won't even tell you what my correspondent's reply was!

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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:00
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
The Voice of the Dragon Jul 25, 2005

My voice recognition software (Dragon Naturally Speaking), when I dictated: Purpose of the Agreement: Tourist activities, wrote it as: Terrorist activities. Good job I proofread it!

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Kathinka van de Griendt  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:00
German to English
+ ...
Love it! Jul 26, 2005

Thanks for sharing. My very own special favourite is "she was in a tit fight", when it should have been "a tight fit".

Kathinka


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avsie  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:00
English to French
+ ...
LOL! Jul 26, 2005

Kathinka Lavelle wrote:

Thanks for sharing. My very own special favourite is "she was in a tit fight", when it should have been "a tight fit".

Kathinka


This one made my day! Thanks for the giggles!


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Buzzy
Local time: 11:00
French to English
more "fraudian" slips Jul 26, 2005

As if we needed more proof that you cannot rely on your spellchecker (especially as I'm a rubbish typist and my keyboard is so old a lot of the keys no longer show the letters on them):
In legal translations, I often seem to include references to the "Pubic Prosecutor" (especially relevant for sex abuse cases?).
In more financial texts, my favourite so far has been "fun-raising". If only!
Dusty, you are in goof company... oops there I go again (and for real too!!)


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Tony M  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 11:00
Member
French to English
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TOPIC STARTER
Great giggles, gals and guys! Jul 27, 2005

Keep them coming!

I'm still chuckling over tit-fight (I know some people like that...)

Just yesterday, I came out with "pout a brave face on it", which certainly has a Freudian ring to it!


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Edward Vreeburg  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 11:00
Member (2008)
English to Dutch
+ ...
OK one more: dead people Jul 27, 2005

instead of deaf people...
Why do they put the D and the F right next to each other???

I regularly do work for an Association for the Deaf)
Nowadays I always do a Search Replace All at the end of each job, just in case...


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Tony M  Identity Verified
France
Local time: 11:00
Member
French to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
A plea for political correctness... Jul 27, 2005

Thanks, Ed! LOL!

Perhaps in that case you should drop the rather frowned-upon 'deaf' and go for something more politically-correct -- that way they could be simply 'vitality-impaired'!


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Andy Watkinson
Spain
Local time: 11:00
Member
Catalan to English
+ ...
Or...... Jul 27, 2005

Dusty wrote:

Thanks, Ed! LOL!

Perhaps in that case you should drop the rather frowned-upon 'deaf' and go for something more politically-correct -- that way they could be simply 'vitality-impaired'!



...."biologically-challenged"


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ViktoriaG  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 05:00
English to French
+ ...
One more... Aug 6, 2006

This was not caused by anything - well, if you can call a writer a "thing", then it was.

I encountered this in a military text I was translating. It should have read "Base Public Affairs Officer" - however, since soldiers also probably have sex once in a while, this guy improvised and became a "Base Pubic Affairs Officer". Maybe on top of karaoke and pool tables, they now also have dating services?


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