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Off topic: Globish, a new language?
Thread poster: Anne Patteet
Anne Patteet  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:03
English to French
+ ...
Dec 11, 2006

Has anyone read this yet? Or heard about it?

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/print/0,,329651304-102280,00.html

I would like to know what you think...
In my opinion, maybe it's exaggerated, but it isn't completely false either.

Thank you,

Anne


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Stanislaw Czech, MCIL  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:03
Member (2006)
English to Polish
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Interesting article Dec 11, 2006

If someone has a problem with opening the above link here is another: http://tinyurl.com/y4mhue

I think that the article is certainly exaggerated but to some extend this phenomenon exists. Of course there are various levels of Globishness. But here in London it's something I meet with in my everyday life. With so many immigrants around people just start using simplified versions of English (at various levels of simplifications) but certainly lack of correct grammar or an extensive vocabulary does not prevent people from communicating. Moreover I am convinced that it's relatively easy to communicate in English even despite mistakes. Almost certainly a Japanese learning English and Polish for the same length of time would be able to communicate much easier in English - or Globish if you prefer this name (I’ve chosen a Japanese here as this language is entirely different from both Polish and English, for example or someone already speaking Slovak learning Polish would be much easier than English).

However one thing should be stressed - Globish is not something organised - it's entirely spontaneous.

Btw have you heard about Zlango???


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texjax DDS PhD  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:03
Member (2006)
English to Italian
+ ...
Globish... Dec 11, 2006

English>
Globish uses a simplified pronunciation guide spelling which merges many of the vowels of English speech. People speaking this spelling dialect could be understood by other English speakers but their pronunciation would be considered a little off.

Globish>
Globish yuzaz a simplifaid pranansiashan gaid speling wich marjaz meny av tha vaeulz av Inglish spich. Pipal spiking dhis speling dialect cud bi andarstud bai adhar Inglish spikarz bat der pranansiashan wud bi cansidard a litl auf.

...and a link
http://members.fortunecity.com/rapidrytr/Spell/globish.html





[Edited at 2006-12-11 02:47]


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Anne Patteet  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:03
English to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks Dec 11, 2006

for the links, texjax and Stanislaw.

I agree with you Stanislaw, many people communicate in a basic English "very well" (that's a funny thing to say), as the idioms are the difficult part. But to make of it a whole new language?

And, no, I didn't know about Zlango... The thing is, I am not too much into SMS, but it's interesting to see what's happening. Thanks!

[Edited at 2006-12-11 04:02]


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esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:03
Member (2006)
English to Russian
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That Globish is bunk Dec 11, 2006

It's no real language, so, it's no future. If you need a real international language, the answer is Esperanto.

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IwonaASzymaniak  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:03
Member
English to Polish
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I don't think so... Dec 11, 2006

esperantisto wrote:

It's no real language, so, it's no future. If you need a real international language, the answer is Esperanto.


Esperanto has been and will remain the choice for just a few zealous lovers while Globish might have a future because so many people learn English and try to communicate in English with other non-English speakers. It is becoming a lingua franca of our times and is devoloping fast with the input from so many different cultures.
Mass communication is also a sort of simplied communication code. If Globish can help us communicate more effectively why not?

Iwona


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Stanislaw Czech, MCIL  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:03
Member (2006)
English to Polish
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It will function but Dec 11, 2006

I agree that Esperanto doesn't have any significant future (what is a bit sad in a way, as life would be so much more simple should we all be able to comunicate using it, and this poor Zamenhof made a huge efford in crating it)

When it comes to Globish - I am sure that people will keep using it but I don't think that anyone is going to learn it on purpose as a language in it's own right.

Than of course I may be wrong


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Marcin Wierzbicki  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:03
English to Polish
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well, it is the future, to some extent :) Dec 11, 2006

I don't think that anyone is going to learn it on purpose as a language in it's own right.


Noone needs to. You learn English, but you start communicating in it before you get the handle of using all these idioms and stuff - and then you see you understand and you are understood - so you stay at the 'Globish-level' of English.

But on the other hand - it is really difficult, if not impossible, to speak English with people of other nationalities (I'm Polish). What counts in such conversations is getting the message through - not speaking the Queen's English.


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esperantisto  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:03
Member (2006)
English to Russian
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Does anything hinder? Dec 11, 2006

Stanislaw Czech wrote:
I agree that Esperanto doesn't have any significant future


Esperanto has already a significant present: it's got approx. 2 million speakers around the world. For a just-over-100-years-old language, it's quite significant.

life would be so much more simple should we all be able to comunicate using it


What hinders? Learning Esperanto is a matter of a couple of months, or a couple of days, or just half an hour — it depends on your linguistic background.

As for that Globish, who's gonna use it? Anglo-Saxons? Of course, not! They speak real English, why they'd bother to learn any simplified? Others? But for what? To communicate with Anglo-Saxons, you'll still need normal English.

A general point: the XXth century has seen lots of similar projects. The last one I remember is so called Europanto, it created some fuss a couple of years ago. And just silently died. I do believe that all those half-baked pieces of nonsense are doomed, none of them will ever reach a fraction of Esperanto's scope. And Esperanto will live forever.


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Dr. Jason Faulkner  Identity Verified
Local time: 22:03
Member (2006)
Spanish to English
Bono Astente! Dec 12, 2006


A general point: the XXth century has seen lots of similar projects. The last one I remember is so called Europanto, it created some fuss a couple of years ago. And just silently died.


I thought they had it down to a science on Channel 9 News (from an old BBC Show called "The Fast Show"). I could of sworn I understood them when they said Hethethethe hethethethe chris waddle. Scorchio!

Then again, I was very, very drunk.

BoutroZ BoutroZ-Ghali!

Jason


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xxxPuicz  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:03
Swedish to English
Get down to Basic(s) Dec 13, 2006

You’ve got to smile sometimes. What is this Globish stuff but good old Basic English (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_English)
Mike


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Ben Gaia MA
New Zealand
Local time: 17:03
French to English
txtng Dec 25, 2006

I thnk txt splng wl take ovr th way English is splt.

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Anne Patteet  Identity Verified
Local time: 23:03
English to French
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
I had never seen that spelling Dec 26, 2006

Ben, I had never seen that kind of spelling (unless written by children), I find it difficult to read because you have to guess too much. However it is interesting to see that some people are thinking of it as the next spelling. Who knows?

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Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
Local time: 05:03
Member (2003)
Danish to English
+ ...
I can't wait! Jan 3, 2007

As a native speaker of UK English I'm just hoping everyone will go over to Globish soon. Or Esperanto - I plan to make a real effort when I retire. I can almost understand it now, so all I need is the time...

Then we Brits can have have our language back

Just when I translate a really expressive, colourful piece of text into something I imagine is a humble tribute to Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth (now THAT's a name for a poet!!) - not to mention John Wycliffe, Thomas Cranmer, Winston Churchill and all the others... somebody wants it levelled out into the sort of language 'everyone' can understand.

In fact it's a good question when, if ever, such a thing as 'pure English' ever existed. It doesn't really exist now - just check out the Microsoft Spell checker! Then that doesn't even begin on Scots, Geordie, Yorkshire, Scouse, Cockney, Somerset, Devonshire and all the other dialects

Some nations love to complain about how English is 'ruining' or 'corrupting' their languages.

Actually, we're just repaying old debts (debits) from Latin, Norse, Danish, French and all the other languages round the world that 'invaded' our language at one time or another.

Maybe that's what makes it so suitable as a global language...

Happy translating, folks!



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