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Off topic: What about \"English soup\"?
Thread poster: Raffaella Cornacchini
Raffaella Cornacchini  Identity Verified
Local time: 14:55
English to Italian
+ ...
Mar 26, 2003

A small contribution from Italy, where trifle - the dessert - is called \"zuppa inglese\", i.e. English soup.

While it could actually have been borrowed from English cuisine by a smart cook, I still wonder why it\'s defined \"soup\". Maybe because you need a spoon to eat it?

raffa1


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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:55
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
An English joke? Mar 26, 2003

Quote:


On 2003-03-26 06:32, raffa1 wrote:

A small contribution from Italy, where trifle - the dessert - is called \"zuppa inglese\", i.e. English soup.

While it could actually have been borrowed from English cuisine by a smart cook, I still wonder why it\'s defined \"soup\". Maybe because you need a spoon to eat it?

raffa1



I like it (your contribution I mean, well - English soup too....).

You remind me of an Italian friend who told the story (with genuine affection!) that in her home city, whenever a joke seemed as if it must mean something, but no one could see what, people would finally look at each other gravely and say, \"Ah yes, it must be an English joke\".





[ This Message was edited by: giulik on 2003-03-27 09:55]

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Gillian Scheibelein  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:55
Member (2003)
German to English
+ ...
Englishman = monkey wrench? Mar 26, 2003

In German a monkey wrench (coach wrench) is called an Engländer (Englishman). I wonder why? Jack-of-all-trades perhaps?

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Steffen Walter  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 14:55
Member (2002)
English to German
+ ...
And also Franzose (Frenchman), Gillian... Mar 28, 2003

...as proven here, for example:



http://www.outback-guide.de/ozinfo/Dict/tools_dict.htm

http://www.profilm.de/insel/mieten/arbwewi.html

http://www.elasto-form.com/deutsch/laserline_Messer.html

http://germanien.ch/Italienisch/ic2.htm



Couldn\'t figure out what the difference between Engländer and Franzose is, if any



Steffen


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OlafK
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:55
English to German
+ ...
It contains custard Mar 29, 2003

Zuppa inglese contains custard proper egg custard (which is called crème anglaise in French) and can be quite liquid.

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DGK T-I  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:55
Member (2003)
Georgian to English
+ ...
A super soup Mar 29, 2003

Umm, sometimes my trifle is quite liquid, but only because I haven\'t made the custard or jelly set properly! I\'m with Raffa that zuppa inglese as we know it is curiously solid to be a soup. Could it be one of those strange and wonderful illogicalities of language with an origin lost in the mists of time? Unless, in pre-refridgeration days the zuppa inglese was served in hot Italian weather conditions which made it run away......



What about Mince pies that contain mince meat with no meat in it, or Sweet Meats that are a sweet containing no meat, and Sweet Breads that are a special kind of meat...

[ This Message was edited by: giulik on 2003-03-30 10:29]


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Katherine Zei  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 07:55
Italian to English
+ ...
Monkey wrench=chiave inglese Apr 1, 2003

That\'s funny about the Englishman--the same word is called an \"English key\" in Italian.



Go figure.





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Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:55
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
A recipe to give you the willies Apr 6, 2003

The following letter was published in the \'Sunday Telegraph\' today under the above heading:



I was intrigued to see the recipe for Spanish garlic chicken (Food & Drink, Magazine, March 30), or, as it was dubiously called, \"Polla al Ajillo\". Whereas \"pollo\" is indeed the word for \"chicken\", \"polla\" is usually a pejorative term for a penis. If I found a \"polla\" on my plate, I would pack it in ice and rush it to the nearest hospital to be reunited with its owner.

Still, I suppose it gives meat and two veg a new twist.

Hannah Malone, Tunbridge Wells, Kent.





My own Spanish-English dictionary (Langenscheidt) says that \"polla\" means \"pullet\", i.e. a chicken, particularly a hen, less than one year old.

So is Ms. Malone right? Perhaps a Spanish speaker would like to comment.

[ This Message was edited by: jdoughty on 2003-04-06 13:29]


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Claudia Iglesias  Identity Verified
Chile
Local time: 08:55
Member (2002)
Spanish to French
+ ...
pollo / polla Apr 6, 2003

Quote:


[...]

Hannah Malone, Tunbridge Wells, Kent.





My own Spanish-English dictionary (Langenscheidt) says that \"polla\" means \"pullet\", i.e. a chicken, particularly a hen, less than one year old.

So is Ms. Malone right? Perhaps a Spanish speaker would like to comment.



[ This Message was edited by: jdoughty on 2003-04-06 13:29]





Hi Jack

Ms. Malone is right, but not for all the Spanish speaking countries



\"polla\" is one of the names given to the penis in some countries of South America (for instance in Chile), but in Spain it has no connotation, and you can even find the \"polla gol\" a sort of loto game.

Here you\'d speak about

pollo / gallina / pollito / gallo

the generic word would be \"ave\".

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xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 14:55
Spanish to English
+ ...
Ms. Malone is right Apr 6, 2003

I beg to differ with you, Claudia. In Spain \"polla\" is also used to mean penis.



From the Diccionario de la Real Academia Española:



polla. (De pollo1).

1. f. Gallina nueva, medianamente crecida, que no pone huevos o que hace poco tiempo que ha empezado a ponerlos.

2. f. En algunos juegos de naipes, puesta (ǁ cantidad que pone el que pierde para disputarla en la mano siguiente).

3. f. malson. pene.



So, Jack, your dictionary gives the translation for the first meaning, while Ms. Malone is referring to the third. I personally have never heard \"polla\" used to refer to anything other than the third here in Madrid, but maybe that\'s because my supermarket only sells your basic \"pollos\" and nothing fancier.


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