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French (Belgium vs. France)
Thread poster: NMT

NMT  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 02:59
English
+ ...
Oct 30, 2007

Is French for Belgium different from French for France? If so, how? I.e. vocabulary, grammar? Are the differences significant or miniscule?

Thanks


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xxxmediamatrix
Local time: 02:59
Spanish to English
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For starters: Oct 30, 2007

http://www.proz.com/topic/68234

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Christiane Allen  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:59
Member (2007)
English to French
No difference Oct 30, 2007

As a former resident in Belgium I have found that there is no significant differences between written French in Belgium and in France. That is definitely not the case with French Canadian!

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Frédéric Combes  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 08:59
Member (2006)
English to Dutch
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Yes, there are differences ... Oct 30, 2007

Hello there,

Actually ... yes, there are. Numbers for instance. Belgians (like me) translate the word "ninety" by "nonante" while French use the word "quatre-vingt-dix". There are a couple of other vocabulary examples which are slipping my mind right now, but there's definitely some minor difference between French from France and French from Belgium when it comes to vocabulary.

About the grammar issue, I don't think there isn't any difference between the two French languages, although I'm not 100% sure of that.

I hope this short explanation was a bit useful.

Kind regards,

Frédéric.


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 01:59
French to Spanish
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Some differences. Oct 30, 2007

Not in grammar, as far as I remember (I'm from Belgium, studied there and in France).

Numbers, of course. Nonante, etc.

Some vocabulary:
Brol (binz) >> a mess.
Crolles (boucles de cheveux) >> hair bucles.
Clinche (poignée) >> lock.
Vidange (bouteilles vides) >> oil change!

(Don't forget Belgium has heavy influence from The Netherlands and Germany).

Pronounciation:

We (belgians) say: Brussel. French say: BruXel.
We say: AnverS. French say: Anver.
(We feel very offended about that!)

We pronounce the French "u" as "ou", not right.
We say: "Et pouis", instead of "Et puis". "Les patates sont couites", instead of "cuites".

And, well, not FRENCH fries, in fact: belgians fries! (Very offensive too!)
And "waffles" are from Belgium.
And mister Sax, and George Simenon, and Jacques Brel, and Johnny Haliday, and some others... little country, they say, but with a huge history!


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Anne Patteet  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:59
English to French
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a few more Nov 1, 2007

floor mop=serpillère (BE)=torchon (FR)
kitchen/dish towel= essuie de cuisine (BE)=torchon (FR)
kitchen/dish cloth= lavette (BE)=torchon (FR)
bath towel=essuie (BE)=servillette (FR)
napkin=servillette (BE)=servillette (FR)
t-shirt=t-shirt (BE)= maillot (de corps) (FR)
restrooms=la toilette (BE)=les toilettes (FR)
torrential rain=drache (BE)(fam.)=douche (FR)(fam.)
breakfast=déjeuner (BE)=petit-déjeuner (FR)
lunch=dîner (BE)=déjeuner (FR)
dinner=souper (BE)=dîner (FR)

I would say that the French "U" becoming "OU" doesn't happen everywhere in Belgium...


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Jenny Forbes  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:59
Member (2006)
French to English
+ ...
Magritte ... Nov 1, 2007

Juan Jacob wrote:

Not in grammar, as far as I remember (I'm from Belgium, studied there and in France).

Numbers, of course. Nonante, etc.

Some vocabulary:
Brol (binz) >> a mess.
Crolles (boucles de cheveux) >> hair bucles.
Clinche (poignée) >> lock.
Vidange (bouteilles vides) >> oil change!

(Don't forget Belgium has heavy influence from The Netherlands and Germany).

Pronounciation:

We (belgians) say: Brussel. French say: BruXel.
We say: AnverS. French say: Anver.
(We feel very offended about that!)

We pronounce the French "u" as "ou", not right.
We say: "Et pouis", instead of "Et puis". "Les patates sont couites", instead of "cuites".

And, well, not FRENCH fries, in fact: belgians fries! (Very offensive too!)
And "waffles" are from Belgium.
And mister Sax, and George Simenon, and Jacques Brel, and Johnny Haliday, and some others... little country, they say, but with a huge history!


Don't forget Magritte - and all those wonderful Flemish masters - Rubens, for one - or don't they count as Belgian, dating from before Belgium was so named?
... and, apart from Tintin, the most famous fictional Belgian of all, perhaps, Hercule Poirot - the creation of an Englishwoman.
Regards,
Jenny.


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