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'to heal' (trans) and 'to sing' -- similar sounding in your language?
Thread poster: Valters Feists

Valters Feists  Identity Verified
Latvia
Local time: 08:18
English to Latvian
+ ...
Jul 30, 2003

In which languages these two verbs (or their roots) are similar?

In my native language, Latvian, they pair nicely:


'to sing' = dziedât
'to heal' = dziedinât


(E.g., a healer heals an ill person; time will heal a lover's broken heart...)

Possibly, are the words 'song' and 'health' also similar in a language?

You can reply anytime; this is an ongoing research.


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Juan Jacob  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 00:18
French to Spanish
+ ...
Well, not in spanish, nor french. Jul 31, 2003

Spanish:
To heal = curar.
To sing = cantar.
French:
To heal = guérir.
To sing = chanter.

But that's nice, in your languaje !

See you.


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Raffaella Cornacchini  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:18
English to Italian
+ ...
an answer for you from Italy Jul 31, 2003

Valters Feists wrote:

In which languages these two verbs (or their roots) are similar?

In my native language, Latvian, they pair nicely:


'to sing' = dziedât
'to heal' = dziedinât


(E.g., a healer heals an ill person; time will heal a lover's broken heart...)

Possibly, are the words 'song' and 'health' also similar in a language?

You can reply anytime; this is an ongoing research.


In Italian you can get a similarity:

sanare - suonare

Although to heal is mainly translated as "guarire" (intr.) or "far guarire" (tr.), you can also say "sanare" (slightly more archaic but perfectly intellegible).
Suonare means to play (an instrument), but definitely there is an assonance between the two verbs.
Wishing you success with your research.
raffa1


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jmadsen  Identity Verified
Local time: 07:18
Not in Danish, either Jul 31, 2003

To heal = læge, hele, helbrede, kurere
To sing = synge, kvæde

Health = sundhed, helbred, helse
Song = sang, vise, kvad

But an interesting theory and very relevant for Latvian at least. I guess your theory is that shamans have used singing when healing patients.

I see two obvious reasons for the two words not being similar in any language: 1) Either they're not related, and 2) The relation has been clouded by new words or loanwords.


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mgjekel
Local time: 07:18
Dutch
+ ...
Sorry, no similarities in Dutch either! (to heal=genezen & to sing =zingen) Jul 31, 2003

Valters Feists wrote:

In which languages these two verbs (or their roots) are similar?

In my native language, Latvian, they pair nicely:


'to sing' = dziedât
'to heal' = dziedinât


(E.g., a healer heals an ill person; time will heal a lover's broken heart...)

Possibly, are the words 'song' and 'health' also similar in a language?

You can reply anytime; this is an ongoing research.


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Spencer Allman
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:18
Finnish to English
Connection in English Jul 31, 2003

I found a connection in English

lullaby - song to send a child to sleep

to lull - to soothe

to soothe - to make pain less acute

and so..

to heal

I agree there must be link between the idea of song and the idea of cure

I am going to Latvia in August - anything I should know?

best
Spencer


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Aida Alvarez  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 22:18
English to Spanish
Also sanar for to heal Jul 31, 2003

In Spanish we also have sanar for to heal.

so it could be: to heal-sanar
to sing-cantar

Just another option.


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Atenea Acevedo  Identity Verified
Local time: 00:18
English to Spanish
+ ...
curar y sanar Aug 1, 2003

Aida Alvarez wrote:

In Spanish we also have sanar for to heal.

so it could be: to heal-sanar
to sing-cantar

Just another option.


Aída is right, "curar" means to cure or heal someone and "sanar" means to get better or heal. However, sanar and cantar don't share a common root.


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Mario Marcolin  Identity Verified
Sweden
Local time: 07:18
Member (2003)
English to Swedish
+ ...
To sing is to feel good? Aug 5, 2003

Dear Valters,

Can it be that dziedinât(dzied-in-ât?)is a verb *derived* from dziedât(dzied-ât),
e.g. a causative =>
'to heal' (CAUSE 'to sing'),
I know that in Lithuanian the suffix -in- sometimes has this meaning.

It's a nice thought anyway: that by making someone sing, you heal them.

Mario

Valters Feists wrote:

In which languages these two verbs (or their roots) are similar?

In my native language, Latvian, they pair nicely:


'to sing' = dziedât
'to heal' = dziedinât


(E.g., a healer heals an ill person; time will heal a lover's broken heart...)

Possibly, are the words 'song' and 'health' also similar in a language?

You can reply anytime; this is an ongoing research.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:18
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
"Sing" and "drink" in Russian Aug 5, 2003

In Russian, the verb to sing is "ïåòü" and the verb to drink is "ïèòü" (Set View>Encoding>Cyrillic Windows to read this).
They are both irregular verbs and easy for a non-native-speaker to confuse. I thought at first that the song "Ïîé, ñîëîâóøêà, ïîé!" (Sing, Nightingale, Sing!) was "Drink, Nightingale, Drink!"


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