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Adverbs: 'correctly-spelled' or 'correctly spelled' ?
Thread poster: Alexandru Pojoga

Alexandru Pojoga
Romania
Local time: 14:30
Japanese to English
+ ...
Feb 6, 2004

Hi,

I used to believe there should be no hyphen after an adverb, but someone told me you can choose either way.

Which one is it?


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Henry Hinds  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:30
English to Spanish
+ ...
No hyphen Feb 6, 2004

I would not use the hyphen.

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António Ribeiro  Identity Verified
Local time: 21:30
English to Portuguese
+ ...
No hyphen Feb 6, 2004

Henry Hinds wrote:

I would not use the hyphen.


Definitively, NO hyphen.


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Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:30
Dutch to English
+ ...
Adverbs and adjectives Feb 6, 2004

I just found this rule which is quite interesting:

http://www.neu.edu/styleguide/11_0.html

Do not use a hyphen to link an adverb that ends in -ly with the word it modifies; the -ly itself signifies a linkage.

Ell Scholars are highly motivated students.

But do use a hyphen to link an adjective that ends in -ly with the word it modifies.

She is a matronly-looking woman.

To determine whether an -ly word is an adverb or an adjective, omit the second part of the compound. If the phrase no longer makes sense, then the -ly word is an adverb (and needs no hyphen); if it still makes sense, the -ly word is an adjective (and needs a hyphen).


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All depends context Feb 6, 2004

I don't think this matter be discussed without exact context shown in the sentence which this phrase is used. In my (humble) opinion however, "correctly-spelled" sounds like a modifyer for a noun that comes immediately after -- in other words it can be adjective as many hyphnated words tend to be. Then, the "correctly spelled" seems to be finalizing some idea that is expressed immediately before (or prior to) the expression "correctly spelled".

[Edited at 2004-02-06 06:05]


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All depends context Feb 6, 2004

I don't think this matter be discussed without exact context shown in the sentence which this phrase is used. In my (humble) opinion however, "correctly-spelled" sounds like a modifyer for a noun that comes immediately after. On the other hand "correctly spelled" seems to be finalizing some idea that is expressed immediately before (or prior to) the expression (correctly spelled).

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Monika Coulson  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:30
Member (2001)
English to Albanian
+ ...
A very useful rule Marijke Feb 6, 2004

Thank you Marijke,
I won't forget this one now.
Monika

Marijke Singer wrote:

I just found this rule which is quite interesting:

http://www.neu.edu/styleguide/11_0.html

Do not use a hyphen to link an adverb that ends in -ly with the word it modifies; the -ly itself signifies a linkage.

Ell Scholars are highly motivated students.

But do use a hyphen to link an adjective that ends in -ly with the word it modifies.

She is a matronly-looking woman.

To determine whether an -ly word is an adverb or an adjective, omit the second part of the compound. If the phrase no longer makes sense, then the -ly word is an adverb (and needs no hyphen); if it still makes sense, the -ly word is an adjective (and needs a hyphen).





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Parrot  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 13:30
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Right Feb 6, 2004

"This word is correctly spelled" (adverb describing participle [verb] acting as noun complement in syntax).

"Enter only correctly-spelled words into the glossary" (compounded adjective).


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Alexandru Pojoga
Romania
Local time: 14:30
Japanese to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
How then to reconcile these two: Feb 6, 2004

From Marijke's post:


"omit the second part of the compound. If the phrase no longer makes sense, then the -ly word is an adverb (and needs no hyphen)"


and

Parrot wrote:

"Enter only correctly-spelled words into the glossary" (compounded adjective).


If "spelled" is omitted in the above quote, the phrase no longer makes sense. And "correctly" is by all means an adverb anyway.

Thoughts?


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Marijke Singer  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:30
Dutch to English
+ ...
More on adverbs Feb 6, 2004

Another gem of a rule:

http://www.spawar.navy.mil/sti/publications/pubs/td/1064/td1064f.html

2. Adverbs

Use a hyphen in compound adjectives consisting of an adverb plus a present or past participle.

ever-rising flood
well-kept facility

Do not use a hyphen in compound adjectives consisting of an adverb ending in ly.

highly stable craft
entirely new method
carefully made pattern

Do not use a hyphen in a three-word compound adjective when the first two elements are adverbs.
not too distant future
usually well preserved specimen


And another:
http://www.mcmaster.ca/ua/opr/styleguide/spelling.html

Hyphens are unnecessary in compound modifiers containing a -ly adverb, even when these fall before the noun. The -ly adverb's function as a part of speech is to modify other adverbs, adjectives and nouns.

She gave us clearly defined terms.
They are a happily married couple.
They will establish a broadly based research center.

I am convinced!


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Alexandru Pojoga
Romania
Local time: 14:30
Japanese to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks all for the input! Feb 7, 2004

In summary, the rule is, never use a hyphen after an adverb.

There are adjectives that look like adverbs -- cowardly, wizardly -- those are o.k. to "hyphenize."

Thanks Marijke for the excellent links!


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Katherine Zei  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 06:30
Italian to English
+ ...
An English grammatical bugbear Feb 11, 2004

Alexandru Pojoga wrote:

In summary, the rule is, never use a hyphen after an adverb.

There are adjectives that look like adverbs -- cowardly, wizardly -- those are o.k. to "hyphenize."

Thanks Marijke for the excellent links!


...and here is one more!

http://www.editfast.com/english/grammar/adjectives_adverbs/adjectives_adverbs_rules_7.htm

Hyphenated compound adjectives are used only before nouns. When they come after nouns, they are not hyphenated (not "hyphenize", please! "To hyphenate" is a real verb in English).


www.editfast.com is fantastic!!! I highly reccomend it.


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Alexandru Pojoga
Romania
Local time: 14:30
Japanese to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Thanks! Feb 11, 2004

Katherine Zei wrote:
(not "hyphenize", please! "To hyphenate" is a real verb in English).


That's why I used the quotes


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jebeen
Local time: 07:30
English to Bengali
+ ...
Adverbs: 'correctly-spelled or correctly spelled'? Feb 16, 2004

Both are correct. They have different meanings. The examples below may help to understand:
a) It is a correctly-spelled word. (Adjective).
b) It is correctly spelled. (Adverb).


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