Mobile menu

Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
It's all cheese - a "real" English phrase?
Thread poster: Rebecca Holmes

Rebecca Holmes
United States
Local time: 12:08
German to English
May 27, 2004

My text (about a cheese factory), starts off with the "Käsemeister" muttering "Das ist doch alles Käse!" as he waits for his unsatisfactory measuring device to yield results on the pH value of the raw milk.

Just for the fun of it I popped "it's all cheese" into Google and came up with 97 hits for this phrase. Many of them look quite appropriate for the second meaning of the German phrase here (something along the lines of "it's all nonsense").

It strikes me as too much of a direct translation, however. Is "It's all cheese" a "real" English phrase and does it have the double cheese/nonsense meaning I am looking for?

Objective opinons from those who haven't spent the past half hour thinking about phrases with "cheese" in them would be much appreciated!


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Ken Cox  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:08
German to English
+ ...
not in my experience (NA) May 27, 2004

I can't recall ever hearing anyone say 'it's all cheese'.

However, it's true that 'cheesy' is commonly used to mean 'poor/low-quality' (a cheesy hotel/motel, etc.), so it's conceivable that you could say 'it's all cheese' to mean 'it's all rubbish'.

I can't speak for the UK idiom.

Further thoughts: 'cheesy' means cheap or shabby, and it's generally applied to objects (including somewhat abstract objects, such as a movie, play or book). It isn't used in the same way as 'Das ist doch alles Käse' to say that something is nonsense; it relates to the quality of something, not its veracity (which is a roundabout way of saying I find it unlikely that 'It's all cheese' to mean 'it's all nonsense' would arise from 'cheesy').

[Edited at 2004-05-27 14:01]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Carley Hydusik  Identity Verified
Local time: 12:08
Russian to English
+ ...
Agree with Kenneth May 27, 2004

Hi Rebecca,

I would agree with Kenneth... I don't think you can say that. I was thinking about how you COULD wind cheese into this, though, and depending on the register... I recall that some speakers of British English say that they are "cheesed off" to mean "exasperated". That might fit into your sentence if it's not too colloquial. I can't think of any American cheese images other than cheesy, which doesn't fit.

Good luck!
Carley


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Ken Cox  Identity Verified
Local time: 18:08
German to English
+ ...
Carley's suggestion is good May 27, 2004

'Cheesed off' is a very common expression in the UK and Canada, and probably understood in the US as well. It would certainly fit your situation. 'Exasperated' is a good translation; it's definitely stronger than 'annoyed'. You can tone it down a bit with 'mildly cheesed off' (for many people, being cheesed off is somewhere between being annoyed and being infuriated, and 'really cheesed off' is about the same as 'infuriated').

[Edited at 2004-05-27 14:10]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Aisha Maniar  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:08
Member (2003)
Arabic to English
+ ...
Not in the UK either.... May 27, 2004

at least not in my experience (in SE England). I've never heard anyone use the expression.
However, further to Carley's post, there are other phrases used (here at least)...like "cheesed off" (although it's a bit negative -feeling fed up, annoyed, etc.), "the big cheese", etc.
Aisha


Direct link Reply with quote
 
RobinB  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 18:08
German to English
Load of cheese May 27, 2004

Rebecca,

There *is* an English expression "a load of cheese", meaning a load of you-know-what, but I fear that it either may be very dated or regional.

Robin


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:08
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Hard cheese May 27, 2004

Another expression in UK English is "Hard cheese!" meaning "Tough luck!". It's hard cheese on the Käsemeister if his cheese isn't turning out right. But I've never heard "It's all cheese".

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Paul Lambert  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 09:08
French to English
+ ...
Cheese cheese cjheese May 27, 2004

'Cheesy' is used by a lot of people to describe something tacky and cheap, like a 'cheesy game-show host' or 'cheesy music' (usually 'throw-away' pop music or 'one-off' novelty songs).

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 19:08
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
What about May 27, 2004

if you let the Käsemeister state: I say cheese all the day!
Quite another meaning but better than nothing.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
xxxsarahl
Local time: 09:08
English to French
+ ...
baloney! May 27, 2004

would probably a close "food" equivalent.
you should probably ask in the kudoz section, see what people can come up with.
Otherwise agree with Kenneth.
Sarah


Direct link Reply with quote
 
John Bowden  Identity Verified
Local time: 17:08
German to English
I think most of the google examples are using "cheese" to mean "cheesy"... May 27, 2004

"The music's all cheese" etc.
But this seems to be a very restricted use - it's certainly not a "normal" or widely-used phrase, and wouldn't be understood in the same way as the German expression.

You might be better off getting the Käsemeister to say something different if you can - maybe using Jack's "hard cheese" suggestion - "It'll be hard cheese if this doesn't turn out right" or something...


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Henk Peelen  Identity Verified
Netherlands
Local time: 18:08
Member (2002)
German to Dutch
+ ...
'cheese anyway' May 27, 2004

Could the cheese master perhaps refer to the product instead of to the measuring device? So, he puts the whole thing into perspective "whatever the pH, it's cheese anyway", to take it easy at the very moment and to look for a better measuring device.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Michele Johnson  Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 18:08
German to English
+ ...
The Big Cheese? May 27, 2004

Rebecca, I would definitely post this as a kudoz question. I personally would prefer some variation on Aisha's "the big cheese" suggestion. "Cheesed off" sounds a bit harsh to my ears for the double entendre you're looking for. For your purposes, I imagine a picture in which the Käsemeister takes up the entire image, waiting impatiently for his results, and a title like "Waiting for the big cheese..."

Direct link Reply with quote
 
Marcus Malabad  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 18:08
Member (2002)
German to English
+ ...
post as KudoZ May 28, 2004

Rebecca,

For discussions of this sort, please post a KudoZ question in the future.

Marcus


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Rebecca Holmes
United States
Local time: 12:08
German to English
TOPIC STARTER
Sorry May 28, 2004

Marcus Malabad wrote:

Rebecca,

For discussions of this sort, please post a KudoZ question in the future.

Marcus






Hi Marcus,
Sorry, was actually hoping someone would simply confirm this as a real English phrase! Thanks to everyone for the input and suggestions, however.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

It's all cheese - a "real" English phrase?

Advanced search






Protemos translation business management system
Create your account in minutes, and start working! 3-month trial for agencies, and free for freelancers!

The system lets you keep client/vendor database, with contacts and rates, manage projects and assign jobs to vendors, issue invoices, track payments, store and manage project files, generate business reports on turnover profit per client/manager etc.

More info »
SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs